Anthony V. Incognito
Supervisor: Dr. Philip J. Millar

Program: MSc Candidate, Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph

Academic Background: HBSc, University of Toronto

Awards:
. Queen Elizabeth II Graduate Scholarship - Doctoral, University of Guelph (2016)
. CIHR Canadian Graduate Scholarship - Masters, University of Guelph (2015)
. Gordon Cressy Student Leadership Award, University of Toronto (2014)
. Scholars Program In-Course Scholarship, University of Toronto (2013)
. Physical and Health Education Alumni Scholarship, University of Toronto (2012)
. R. Tait McKenzie Society Inductee, University of Toronto (2011)

Research Interests:
My research interests are focused on understanding the role of the sympathetic nervous system in human cardiovascular regulation. Our lab is able to directly assess sympathetic outflow directed to skeletal muscle using single and multi-unit microneurography, in addition to measures of blood flow, blood pressure, and vascular and cardiac dynamics. We study how these measures change and interact in response to specific cardiovascular afferent reflexes (e.g. muscle metaboreflex, cardiopulmonary baroreflex reflex), as well as integrated cardiovascular perturbations (e.g. exercise, dietary supplementation) to better understanding the integrated control of the circulation.

Thesis Topic:
Effects of ischemic preconditioning on neural and hemodynamic responses to muscle metaboreflex activation.

Publications:
1. Incognito AV et al. The effects ischemic preconditioning on human exercise performance. Sports Med. 2016;46(4):531-44.
2. Sharif H, Millar PJ, Incognito AV, Ditor DS. Non-invasive electrocardiographic assessments of cardiac autonomic modulation in individuals with spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord. 2016;54(3):166-71.
3. Incognito AV et al. Effects of ischemic preconditioning on neural and hemodynamic responses to muscle metaboreflex activation. FASEB J. 2016. (Abstract)
4. Incognito AV et al. Exploring the relationship between cardiovascular stress reactivity and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity among young healthy men. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2015;40(9 Suppl 1):S29. (Abstract)
5. Nguyen CH, Incognito AV et al. Sympathetic drive post-aerobic and isometric exercise is reflected in changes in heart rate, not blood pressure. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2015;40(9 Suppl 1):S46. (Abstract)
6. Incognito AV et al. Transient blood pressure response to isometric handgrip exercise in young males. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 2013;38(10):1044. (Abstract)

Conferences Attended:
. Experimental Biology 2016, San Diego, CA
. Ontario Exercise Physiology 2016, Barrie, ON
. The Saltin International Graduate Course in Clinical & Exercise Physiology 2015, Toronto, ON
. Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology Annual General Meeting 2015, Hamilton, ON
. Bodies of Knowledge Graduate Student Conference 2015, Toronto, ON
. Bertha Rosenstadt National Undergraduate Research Conference in Kinesiology and Physical Education 2014, Toronto, ON
. Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology Annual General Meeting 2013, Toronto, ON
. Bertha Rosenstadt National Undergraduate Research Conference in Kinesiology and Physical Education 2013, Toronto, ON

Mini Biography:
I completed by undergraduate education in Kinesiology at the University of Toronto that was sparked by my experiences in competitive hockey. My undergraduate research in blood pressure regulation cultivated my interests in understanding the role of the autonomic nervous system in cardiovascular control, which led me to my current research studies. Apart from being a student at the University of Guelph, I am a graduate student representative on the Human Research Ethics Board, as well as the President of Exercise is Medicine Canada. I am also continually engaged in teaching, working as a teaching assistant, guest speaking at community health seminars, undergraduate tutoring, and participating in teaching education workshops. My career goals are to run a research program and a medical practice, as well as becoming an adjuct professor for medical students in my senior years.