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Pollinators in the Press

Current Articles                    (Article Archives ⇒)

Articles about NSERC-CANPOLIN researchers and the Network, as well as pollinators and pollination, that appear in the news will be posted here! Click on the title of the news item to find out more. The stories will open in a new tab or window depending on your specific browser and settings.

CANPOLIN in the News                         Pollinators in the News

 


CANPOLIN in the News
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  • CANPOLIN 2010
  • CANPOLIN 2009
  • CANPOLIN 2008

Les Shipp, Peter Kevan and NSERC-CANPOLIN: Predators and pollinators - Among Harrow projects is global warming’s potential impact on biocontrols, and the latest buzz (link)

NSERC-CANPOLIN: Pollinators and Plants - Theirs is a partnership that humans must protect, Portico Magazine, Summer 2010 (link)

Stephen Humphrey: Toronto Writer Suits Up as Apiarist U of G’s pollination research group invites a poet into their hive, At Guelph, May 2010 issue

Laurence Packer: The unbearable plight of beeness When a bug we rely on for so much is in trouble, so are we, Montreal Gazette, May 15, 2010 - a review of his new book "Keeping the Bees: Why all Bees are at Risk and What we can do to Save Them"

Ernesto Guzman: News @ Noon, discussing the issue of honeybee colony collapse disorder (link)

Ernesto Guzman: Discovery Channel's Daily Planet (video link)

Peter Kevan: "Using Pollination Research", The Grower, April 2010 (PDF)

Ernesto Guzman: "Prof Solves Bee Loss Mystery," University of Guelph News, March 3, 2010 (link)

Ernesto Guzman: "Finally, a suspect in bee decline", The Toronto Star, January 24, 2010. (link)

CANPOLIN: Some researchers from the Network appeared on CBC's The Nature of Things, January 7th, 2010. (link): To Bee or Not to Bee

CBC to bee or not to bee

CANPOLIN Peter Kevan: Guelph Portico Magazine, "Kevan gets Royal Society honours, heads national research network" January 2010 (PDF)

CANPOLIN UofG: At the University of Guelph, experts in bees and numbers are working together on studies of hive design, pollination webs and disease transmission, December 9, 2009. (link)

CANPOLIN Steve Pernal and Rob Currie: Buzzkill: Dire Outlook for Honeybees and the Consumers Who Depend on Them, AOL Environment News, November 20, 2009. (link)

CANPOLIN: New Research Network to Shed Light on Pollinator Decline, Hive Lights November, 2009. (PDF)

CANPOLIN: Bees play big role in food, article courtesy The Western Producer, October 8, 2009 (PDF)

Jeremy Kerr: Science puts malaria fight on the map, The Star, September 13, 2009 (link)

CANPOLIN: Where have all the bees gone? Septemeber 2009 The New Internationalist Magazine Issue 425. (link)

CANPOLIN: Official NSERC announcement of the Network. (link)

CANPOLIN: U of G Hub for Two $5-Million Research Networks. (link)(At Guelph article: PDF)

Peter Kevan: one of two University of Guelph professors who have been elected to the Royal Society of Canada, considered Canada's senior academic honour. (link)(At Guelph article: PDF)

CANPOLIN: June 2009 New Research Network to Shed Light on Pollinator Decline, Entomological Society of Canada Bulletin, Volume 41 (2): 93-94. (PDF)

Laurence Packer and Gaham Forbes: We can't live without life support, The Daily Gleaner, June 30, 2009. (link)

Laurence Packer: Why biodiversity matters, Telegraph-Journal, June 20, 2009. (link)

Cory Sheffield: CBC Radio Maritime Noon with Costas Halavrezos, June 12, 2009. (Link - C. Sheffield interview) (8.78MB)

Peter Kevan: CBC Radio Maritime Noon with Laura Chapin, June 13, 2009. (link - P. Kevan interview) (6.39MB)

Elizabeth Elle: Bees' disappearance has biologists buzzing, interview with CTV British Columbia, May 16, 2009. (link)

Laurence Packer: Our bumblebees on the brink, NOW magazine. (link)

Peter Kevan conducted an interview with RCI Radio's The Link - the interview is at 26 minutes in part 2 from March 31st (be sure to select the second part of the program at the top of the page, 2009-03-31).

Laurence Packer and York University: Rogers, Theresa. "The Bee Keeper." Lab Business Spring 2009: 18-22. (link)

Peter Kevan: Savage, C. December, 2008. The Plight of the Bumblebee. Canadian Geographic. (PDF)

 


 

Pollinators in the News
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Lawmakers caucus around beleaguered bees

June 30, 2010
Modesto Bee
awmakers are rallying behind the beleaguered honeybee by creating a congressional caucus to promote research and focus attention on the troubling collapse of bee colonies. The caucus comes as farmers, scientists and industry officials scramble for answers to the mystery behind the significant colony loss over the past four years. In some cases, beekeepers have lost 40 percent or more of their colonies, potentially endangering the pollination of many fruits, nuts and vegetables.

 

University receives £1.1m to fund pollinator research

June 30, 2010
Press Zoom
The University of Reading has been awarded £1.1m to help identify the main threats to bees and other insect pollinators and how to reverse a decline in their numbers. Dr Simon G. Potts, Principal Research Fellow in the School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, will be working with colleagues at other institutions across the country on the Insect Pollinators Initiative.

 

The latest buzz on native bees

June 30, 2010
El Defensor Chieftain
This summer, Erv (Nichols) and I are volunteering a few hours at Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, a familiar place that still holds surprises. Recently I've been amazed by some small critters usually taken for granted — bees. Every two weeks, we monitor insect traps for Karen Wetherill, a UNM scientist studying long-term trends in native bee abundance and diversity at both Sevilleta and Bosque del Apache national wildlife refuges. She is particularly interested in how native bees are affected by the removal of invasive salt cedars, documenting bees' numbers and diversity as native vegetation is re-established. Good news — they seem to be increasing!

 

Pheasants Forever hunting for honeybee habitat

June 30, 2010
Review Messenger
Pheasants Forever is in the pollinator habitat business. Pheasants and quail share a common need for habitat featuring a diverse forb (flowering plant) component with pollinating insects like honey bees, butterflies, beetles, and bats. As part of National Pollinator Week, Pheasants Forever has been hosting habitat tours in Nebraska.

 

New congressional caucus focuses on plight of honeybees

June 28, 2010
Bellingham Herald
Lawmakers are rallying behind the beleaguered honeybee by creating a congressional caucus to promote research and focus attention on the troubling collapse of bee colonies. The caucus comes as farmers, scientists and industry officials scramble for answers to the mystery behind the significant colony loss over the past four years. In some cases, beekeepers have lost 40 percent or more of their colonies, potentially endangering the pollination of many fruits, nuts and vegetables.

 

Answers To Mystery Of Bee Decline Sought In Nine UK Projects From The Insect Pollinators Initiative

June 28, 2010
Before It's News
Projects worth a total of up to £10M ($15 million) from the Insect Pollinators Initiative were announced June 22nd 2010, during National Insect Week. These projects will explore the causes and consequences of threats to insect pollinators and ask questions about the decline of honeybees and other pollinating insects over recent years. The aim is to inform the development of mitigation strategies that will ensure that the pollination of agricultural and horticultural crops is protected and biodiversity in natural ecosystems is maintained.

 

They're more than just birds and bees: Meet the pollinators

June 27, 2010
Daily Herald
In your garden lurk life forms carrying out a covert mission with far-reaching implications for the planet. Some work under cover of night, some at dawn and dusk, some in broad daylight. They are efficient, determined, and single-minded in their pursuits.

 

Bee shelters can help to pollinate home garden

June 27, 2010
Columbia Tribune
Bees need us, and we need them. In your yard, plant a succession of spring, summer and fall flowering plants so bees have a continual source of nectar. In return, they help pollinate plants in our home vegetable gardens and farm fields. To further help bees, you can create simple houses for the orchard mason bee.

 

Flowers of the Night

June 27, 2010
Xomba
At first glance, it would seem that night-blooming flowers are missing the point. After all, who can enjoy them in the late darkness of the night? Are they one of nature’s bloopers? Night-blooming plants are actually right on target for the job they have been given. Their natural pollinators are nocturnal creatures. However, flowers that bloom at nighttime can be equally enjoyed by the millions of people now working evening or night shifts.

 

New Pesticides Booklet: Bee Safe Bee Careful When using insecticides

CPA's new booklet available online (link)

 

Create a simple house for orchard mason bees

June 25, 2010
Seatle Times
In your yard, plant a succession of spring, summer and fall flowering plants so bees have a continual source of nectar. In return, they help pollinate plants in our home vegetable gardens and farm fields.

 

Rusty Patched, Western, Yellow Banded: Bumblebee 'Endangered Species'

June 24, 2010
Post Chronicle
The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, Defenders of Wildlife, Natural Resources Defense Council and Dr. Robbin Thorp have submitted a citizen petition to the U. S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) requesting the Secretary to take action to regulate the movement and health of commercial bumble bees.

 

UK launches £10m research project to stop insect decline

June 24, 2010
Green Fudge
Due to concerns over the rapid decline in the population of Britain’s insect pollinators in recent years, a research program was launched on Tuesday, allotting £10m (€12m) to the discovery of why bees and other insects are dying off. If all insect pollinators in the UK became extinct, it would cost the national economy £440m (€534m) per year. And although honeybees get most of the attention, they are just one of Britain’s many crucial pollinator insect species.

 

Why the great buzz about bees?

June 23, 2010
Telegraph UK
As I worked my way through the frames of my beehive this spring, it soon became clear that something was wrong. The bees had not eaten enough of the honey stores they had accumulated last summer and, while there were still a good number of them, they seemed a little aggressive and lacking in direction.

 

Species of Bees under Threat

June 23, 2010
Top News
The population of honeybees, bumblebees, hoverflies, moths, wasps and butterflies is in danger. There has been a 75% fall in the species of butterfly in the UK, three species of bumblebees are now died out and honeybees have been struggling for life, for the last few years.

 

Loss of bees could be 'a blow to UK economy'

June 22, 2010
BBC News
If bees and other pollinators were to disappear completely, the cost to the UK economy could be up to £440m per year, scientists have warned. This amounts to about 13% of the country's income from farming. In a bid to save the declining insects, up to £10m has been invested in nine projects that will explore threats to pollinators. The Insect Pollinators Initiative will look at different aspects of the insects' decline.

 

Lack of bees could cause 'wonky strawberries'

June 22, 2010
Telegraph UK
Bees are responsible for one in three mouthfuls of our food, thanks to pollination, researchers claim. But if there are no insects to cross fertilise certain plants, farmers may be unable to continue growing crops like apples and pumpkins.

 

Cities could help save declining insect populations

June 22, 2010
University of Bristol
The lure of urban habitats for bees, flies, beetles and butterflies is to be investigated by researchers hoping to find a solution to the declining numbers of insect pollinators, without which, the UK could face severe agricultural setbacks.

 

Royal Holloway academics secure £3m grants to address decline of bees:

June 22, 2010
Royal Holloway, University of London
Academics from the School of Biological Sciences at Royal Holloway, University of London have been awarded two separate grants of up to £3million to explore the causes and consequences of threats to insect pollinators and to ask questions about the decline of bees. The first project, ‘The impact and mitigation of emergent disease on major UK insect pollinators’, is being carried out by Dr Mark Brown and Professor Vincent Jansen from Royal Holloway in partnership with Dr Robert Paxton from Queen’s University Belfast and Dr Juliet Osborne from Rothamsted Research.

 

Widespread impact of insect decline

June 22, 2010
Public Service UK
A £10 million scheme, The Insect Pollinators Initiative, has been launched to fund projects investigating the decline of bees, butterflies and other pollinating insects in recent years.

 

Loss of bees could be 'a blow to UK economy'

June 22, 2010
BBC News
If bees and other pollinators were to disappear completely, the cost to the UK economy could be up to £440m per year, scientists have warned. This amounts to about 13% of the country's income from farming.

 

UF/IFAS study takes good look at largely unknown native pollinators

June 21, 2010
University of Florida
Ask a regular Joe on the street what he knows about bees, and he’ll no doubt believe you to be talking about the kind brought to the U.S. long ago from Europe for honey-making purposes.

 

Scottish university to study decline of honey bees

June 21, 2010
BBC News
Scientists at a Scottish university are to investigate the mystery of what is killing off honey and bumble bees. The new research by Dundee University will look into whether pesticides are harming the brains of the bees.

 

Bees in the Big Apple

June 17, 2010
Switchboard - Natural Resources Defense Council
Last week, NRDC’s New York office welcomed its newest residents -- three hives of honeybees. As I type, the bees are buzzing merrily on the roof above my head, gathering pollen and nectar from the nearby parks and rooftop gardens. New York City legalized beekeeping in April, and what better way to welcome this sweet beginning than by making a home for our pollinator friends on our very own rooftop?

 

Create simple houses for orchard mason bees

June 17, 2010
KansasCity.com
Bees need us and we need them. In your yard, plant a succession of spring, summer and fall flowering plants so bees have a continual source of nectar. In return, they help pollinate plants in our home vegetable gardens and farm fields.

 

Bridgemere Garden Centre plea to take part in Tree Bee Survey

June 17, 2010
Crewe Chronicle
Garden World is inviting people to take part in a survey all about a special type of bumblebee this month. The Nantwich garden centre is backing the Bumblebee Conservation Trust’s (BBCT) Tree Bee Survey as part of its Insect and Wildlife Week, which runs from until Sunday.

 

The world's most beneficial insect

June 17, 2010
South East Missourian
This large Carpenter bee (pictured above) rolled around inside a Purple poppy mallow flower with intensity as I watched it outside my office earlier this week. I thoroughly enjoyed watching him roll and turn and roll again, as he loosened the flower's pollen and bathed in it. The perception that stinging insects are instinctively aggressive at any time and place is wrong, and blinds us to the role they play in nature's balance.

 

What’s pollinating black cohosh?

June 16, 2010
Carrboro Citizen
Anne Lindsey – botanical researcher and teacher and co-author, with husband Ritchie Bell, of the second edition of Wild Flowers of North Carolina – has several of us asking that question these days about whatever flower we may be observing. Leading up to next week’s National Pollinator Week, Anne’s month-long series of N.C. Botanical Garden classes on pollination ecology is well timed.

 

New Species of Large Blue Butterfly Discovered

June 9, 2010
Science Daily
Chinese and German scientists have found a new butterfly species in the south of China. It is the first known species of the family of large blue butterflies found to live in mountain forests. The new species from northwestern Yunnan was discovered by Prof. Min Wang of the South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China and Dr. Josef Settele of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research -- UFZ, Halle, Germany.

 

Mining bee found in Stirling 'a first' for Scotland

June 8, 2010
BBC News
A type of bee has been recorded for the first time in Scotland, in the grounds of a university where the Bumblebee Conservation Trust (BBCT) is based. The tawny mining bee was found in the University of Stirling's campus by the trust's director Dr Ben Darvill.

 

Entomology graduate fellowship to honor apiarist Lorenzo L. Langstroth

June 7, 2010
PSU News
Penn State has received a $250,000 gift to endow a graduate fellowship in entomology in the College of Agricultural Sciences. At the request of the donor, who wishes to remain anonymous, the endowment will be named the Lorenzo L. Langstroth Graduate Fellowship in Entomology, in honor of the 19th century apiarist widely considered to be the "father of American beekeeping."

 

Pollen the topic at USU Extension workshop

June 7, 2010
Cache Valley Daily
Utah State University Cooperative Extension and the USDA-ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Laboratory co-sponsor “Discovering the World of Bees” Pollinator Workshop Friday, June 25, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Eccles Conference Center at USU.

 

Who Are We Sharing the Planet With? Millions Less Species Than Previously Thought, New Calculations Suggest

June 2, 2010
Science Daily
New calculations reveal that the number of species on Earth is likely to be in the order of several million rather than tens of millions. The findings, from a University of Melbourne-led study, are based on a new method of estimating tropical insect species -- the largest and one of the most difficult groups on the planet to study -- having significant implications for conservation efforts.

 

‘Bee Census’ as Scots Hives Face Disaster

June 1, 2010
Daily Press UK
MINISTERS have launched a “bee census” amid fears that an outbreak of deadly disease devastated hives over the winter. A dozen Government bee inspectors are examining the damage caused to hives and apiaries by the outbreak.

 

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