News related to Psychology

Sugar in the diet may increase risks of opioid addiction

Francesco LeriNew research from the University of Guelph's laboratory of behavioral neuroscience suggests a diet high in refined sugars could make children and adults more susceptible to opioid addiction and possible overdose. 

Research underway in Yukon to develop quick FASD screening

Photo of Kaitlyn McLachlanPsychology Professor, Kaitlyn McLachlan, is leading a new project in Yukon that will use EEG machines and video to record eye movements aiming to detect Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) sooner.  Earlier detection could help direct resources to peple with FASD much sooner. The goal is to develop "validated, fast, reliable and efficient screening technologies," that allow for quick evaluations.

Pioneering cannabinoid research at UoG with Psyc Professor, Dr. Linda Parker

Photo of Dr. Linda ParkerDr. Linda Parker is a psychology and neuroscience professor at the University of Guelph and has been studying the pharmacological properties of cannabinoids on brain behaviours for almost two decades. She is the current president of the CCIC and is the 2016 recipient of the ICRS Lifetime Achievement Award.

Psyc Professor, Dr. Barbara Morrongiello, on the importance of watching children swim this summer despite swimming lessons

Photo of Dr. Barbara MorrongielloDr. Barbara Morrongiello, a psychology professor at the University of Guelph who holds a Canada Research Chair in child and youth injury prevention, conducted a study with her colleagues looking at the safety of children while they swim. She concluded that parents often overestimate their childs ability to swim compared to the assessment of instructors.

Photo of a person filling a vaccination needle with a vial.

Public Deliberation Study Offers Potential for Higher Vaccination Rates

 

A new project by University of Guelph researchers looking at how to encourage public discussion of vaccination may also lead to higher vaccination rates, says the lead researcher.

The study will examine how best to engage people, including parents, in public deliberation about controversial topics, utilizing vaccination as a case model, said psychology professor Kieran O’Doherty. The study received a $100,000 grant from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research last summer.

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