Rod Gentry

Department of Mathematics and Statistics
and the Biophysics Interdepartmental Group B.I.G.
University of Guelph
Guelph, Ontario Canada N1G 2W1

Office: MACN 542 Telephone Area 519 824-4120 EXT: 3573
Fax: Area 519 837-0221
E-MAIL rgentry@uoguelph.ca

Teaching schedule

Fall semester 01:

Math*1080 Elements of Calculus    Tu-Th  8:30-10:00, Th 2:30-3:20

MATH*4510 Environmental Transport Modeling  MWF 12:30-1:20

 

Winter Semester 02

Math*2080   Elements of Calculus II  MWF 8:30-9:30 AXEL 200

Office hours:  I am normally in the office every day.

Drop by or give a call or e-mail (except MATH1080 students, who should first access the Math Learning Center for help or should see me personally.)


   
#Courses #Personal #Research Interests #Publications #Graduate Students   Summer Students Post-Docs.

Research Group  Summer 2001 

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Above, Left to right: Rod Gentry, Nichol Watt, Sharene Bungay, Michael Butler

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Links to Courses that I have recently taught.

Course MATH*1080    Course MATH*4510   Course MATH*6051   Course MATH*2170

Personal Information

Degrees: B.A., M.A. Western Washington State, Ph.D. University of California, Davis

Visiting appointments at other institutions:


Research Interests


Mathematical Modeling:

My principal research is part of a collaborative project that is focused on elucidating the mechanisms and kinetics of the Tissue Factor pathway leading to blood coagulation. This modeling entails close collaboration with medical researchers, and involves the development and analysis of both differential equation models and stochastic computer simulation models of the underlying physic-chemical processes. Our current work is focusing on two problems. One is to establish the kinetic role of rotational diffusion of membrane bound substrates that diffuse transitionally to an enzyme on the membrane. The other is to understand the kinetics of a flow reactor, this is an experimental analog of a blood vessel, consisting of a cylinder with enzymes attached to its surface through which a fluid carrying the substrate flows. In such systems, both connective and diffusional processes are involved in carrying the substrate to the enzyme attached on the tube wall. The mathematical analysis of this problem is difficult because of the boundary conditions. To explore the kinetics of such reactors for different enzyme density on the tube surface and for different substrate concentrations entering the system we are utilizing a simulation model that incorporates fluid flow, diffusion, and enzymatic kinetics.


Research associates include:

 



Recent Publications and Presentations.

BOOKS



Graduate Students

Sharene Bungay
  • BSc MSc Memorial University NFL
  • PhD Thesis topic: Modeling the Thrombolytic System in Follicular Fluid
  • Personal Web Page: http://www.math.mun.ca/~sharene/ 
  • E-mail: sbungay@uoguelph.ca
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Michael Butler, MSc Student Fall 1999 Tentative Thesis Topic: Kinetics of the Fibrinolytic System

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Lisa Barrucco Stansfield
MSc Project: "Influence of Rotational Diffusion on Surface Reactions in Coagulation: Simulation Studies" (1997)
Currently: Programmer Analyst with The Royal Bank, Toronto
E-Mail to lisa@iridani.com
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Andy Johnston
Optimizing Insulin Delivery in an Artificial Beta-cell Environment., MSc 1995
Currently: employed with Northern Digital, Waterloo Ontario
E-Mail to andy@ndigital.com


Jill Degroote
Mathematical Modeling of HIV Transmission., MSc 1994
Currently:  Enjoying Life.
Was a PhD student Dept. Biostatistics, Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary but has moved to Pensylvania and is raising two children. 


Dana Rusu
Nonlinear kinetics models of reactions catalyzed by enzymes attached to the interior surface of a tubular flow reactor. MSc 1994
Currently: Teacher training
 
Cindy-Ann Ritchie
Two Approaches to modelling daily temperature data using time series analysis., MSc 1995

Currently: employed with GLAXO, Toronto Ontario.

 

Liqiang Ye
MSc 1986  A study of an automated manufacturing process: modeling and simulation of an automotive assembly line.
 
PhD. Thesis: Computer simulation studies of lipid surface reactions in blood coagulation., PhD 1990 (Biophysics)
        Post-Doctoral Fellow. 1991-4
Currently: Principal, Guangzhou International School, Longdong, Tianhe Distric, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China 51052. gzhuamei@public1.guangzhou.gd.cn

 



Summer Students

Nicole Watt   Summer 2001
  •   Office  MACNAUGHTON 539
  • Web page:  http://www.uoguelph.ca/~nwatt
  • Working on simulations of diffusion through regions with elliptical obstacles.
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/Post-Doctoral Fellows

Liqiang Ye   1992-4

Andrew Kuharsky   1998-9


Last updated 03/13/2002