Ivelisse Robles

Ph.D. Candidate
Email: 
irobles@uoguelph.ca
Phone number: 
(613) 790-4556
Office: 
ANNU 218
Summary: 

Ph.D. Candidate with Dr. Trevor DeVries.

Profile

Ivelisse was born in New Jersey, United States and raised in the beautiful island of Puerto Rico.  At a very young age, she became fascinated by animals, how they behaved and their well-being. This concern for animal’s well-being led her to believe she wanted to be a Veterinarian. She studied at the University of Puerto Rico-Arecibo for a year and then she moved back to the United States as she had planned for years, to continue her studies. She completed her BSc. in Animal Science at the University of Delaware (2009).  At her junior year, she realized she wanted to work with animals but not as a veterinarian. During her senior year, she went to a winter study abroad in Australia with a focus on agricultural education and livestock production, did an artificial insemination course at Precision Diagnostics during the spring as well as a summer internship at the Brandywine Zoo in Delaware. Upon her graduation, she took a year off from college to explore her career options, as her interest for animal behavior and for teaching grew. In 2010, she began her MA in Curriculum and Instruction at the Angelo State University in Texas. In 2012 after her MA completion, she resigned to her 6 year job at AT&T as a retail sales consultant and she moved to Edinburgh to complete her MSc. in Applied Animal Behavior and Welfare at the University of Edinburgh. For her MSc. thesis research, Ivelisse went to the UBC Dairy Education/Agriculture and Agri-food Research Centre in Agassiz, BC. Her research focused on changes in activity and oestrus behavior in heifers between the first and later oestruses. Upon her Msc. graduation (2013), Ivelisse taught Science at a middle school in Puerto Rico for a semester and then moved to Canada in August to begin her PhD. in Animal Behavior and Welfare at the University of Guelph-Kemptville Campus with Dr. DeVries. Her PhD. focuses on the impact of cow housing comfort on behavior and udder health.