Characterization of Starch, Bioactive and Anti-Nutritional Compounds of Saskatchewan Grown Pulses Prepared with Various Cooking Conditions

Date and Time

Location

Food Science lecture room 128

Details

DEFENCE ANNOUNCEMENT
Final Examination for the Degree of MSc Food Science - YIHAN LIU

Examining Committee
Dr. Yoshi Mine, Chair
Dr. Massimo Marcone, Advisor
Dr. Sanaa Ragaee, Co-Advisor
Dr. Michael Rogers, Department Member

TITLE: Characterization of Starch, Bioactive and Anti-Nutritional Compounds of Saskatchewan Grown Pulses Prepared with Various Cooking Conditions 

ABSTRACT: Pulses are a rich source of several nutrients such as protein, starch, dietary fiber, minerals and vitamins, as well as bioactive compounds. Cooking under different conditions, i.e. using different cooking methods and various solutions could considerably affect the nutritional quality of pulses. The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of different cooking methods (induction, pressure, microwave and slow cooking) and cooking solutions (water, salt, sugar and citric acid) on nutritional quality, phenolic compounds and anti-nutrients in selected pulses (faba bean, lentil and pea) grown in Saskatchewan, Canada. All pulses were soaked for 24h prior to cooking by any method except for the induction cooking of lentil. For faba bean slow cooking (for 9 h at 80°C after 2 min blanching) in 1.0% sugar solution had the most pronounced effect in reducing starch digestibility, flatulence oligosaccharides and trypsin inhibitor compared to all cooking conditions. But the most retention of total phenolic compounds (TPC) and antioxidant capacity were obtained after induction or microwave cooking regardless of the cooking solution. For lentil, among all cooking methods parboiling (1 min) followed by holding (10 min) period, resulted in significant reduction in starch digestibility, oligosaccharides and trypsin inhibitor. While the highest concentration of TPC and antioxidant capacity of lintel were reserved after microwaving for 2.5min in water. For pea among all cooking conditions, slow cooking in water is the recommended method to significantly reduce starch digestibility and lower the concentration of flatulence oligosaccharides and trypsin inhibitor. While induction cooking gave the high TPC and antioxidant of cooked pea. The results demonstrated that cooking conditions (cooking methods and cooking solutions) could significantly affect the nutritional quality of the cooked pulses to different extents.

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