C. Meghan McMurtry

Area: 
Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Email: 
cmcmurtr@uoguelph.ca
Phone: 
519-824-4120 x52499
Fax: 
519-837-8629
Office/Building: 
MacKinnon Extension
Office Hours: 

By appointment only please.
 

Room: 
4004

Accepting Graduate Students: 
Yes
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: 
Yes

Meghan McMurtry is an Associate Professor in the CPA-accredited Clinical Psychology program at the University of Guelph, director of the Pediatric Pain, Health, and Communication Lab. She is a Clinical and Health Psychologist with the Pediatric Chronic Pain Program at McMaster Children's Hospital, an Adjunct Research Professor in Paediatrics at Western University, and an Associate Scientist at the Children's Health Research Institute. Her research and clinical interests in child health psychology focus on acute and chronic pain, medical procedure-related fear, as well as communication and family influences in these contexts.

Her research has been funded by the the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Canadian Foundation for Innovation, Team for Research with Adolescents and Children in Palliation and Grief, and the Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation.

Pediatric Chronic Pain Program
McMaster Children's Hospital

Associate Scientist
Children's Health Research Institute 

Adjunct Independent Researcher
Department of Paediatrics
Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry
Western University

Pediatric psychology, pediatric procedural pain and fear, parent-child interactions, chronic pain, family influences on children's pain, evidence-based treatment of pediatric procedural pain and needle fear, and training in health.

Education

Meghan McMurtry completed her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at Dalhousie University in Halifax, NS and her psychology residency at Brown University in Providence, RI in 2010.

Research

Meghan's research in pediatric pain has focused on three related areas:

1) the behaviour of parents while their children are in pain, particularly the role of reassurance;
2) advocacy and policy work in the evidence-based treatment of pediatric procedural pain;
3) the role and measurement of child fear in the context of pain.

 

In the Pediatric Pain, Health, and Communication Lab, she will continue to study pain and fear in children as well as other pediatric health issues, and communication in medical contexts.

Meghan's Research Bio                                                                                                                       

My research broadly focuses on pain (both acute and chronic) and fear in children and adolescents including:

Adult-child interactions during children's medical procedures (e.g., venipunctures)
Measurement and intervention for child fear and pain during needle procedures
Family context and correlates of needle fear
Psychosocial factors in pediatric chronic pain
Pain-related training needs for health care professionals and other caregivers

The aim of my research is to reduce the amount of pain and fear that children experience. For example, children report needles to be one of their most feared and painful experiences: much of my work focuses on how we can help children in this context (e.g., How can we interact with children during needles in ways to help them cope?  How do we understand/measure what they are feeling?  What are important factors in fear of needles and how can we help?). Work within my Pediatric Pain, Health and Communication Lab emphasizes children's own perceptions of their health and their feelings in both acute and chronic pain contexts. A current collaboration with the Pediatric Gastroenterology Service at LHSC Children's seeks to understand what kinds of factors (e.g., optimism) may help children and adolescents function well in their daily lives in spite of experiencing pain. Other work focuses on understanding and addressing gaps in the pain training of caregivers caring for children who may be particularly at risk of experiencing pain (e.g., children with Cystic Fibrosis, children with cognitive impairments).

My goal is to conduct innovative, methodologically-rigorous research. My interests are sparked when I see connections or applications of research across areas and disciplines.  As I am always interested in hearing from potential collaborators, please feel free to email me. 

 

Selected Publications

Peer-Reviewed Publications (underlined names denote trainees under Dr. McMurtry's supervision)

42. Genik, L.M., Pomerleau, C., McMurtry, C.M., & Breau, L.M. (2017). Pain assessment and management strategies when caring for children with intellectual disabilities: Measuring caregiver knowledge. Pain Management, e-pub ahead of print March 7, 2017. doi: 10.2217/pmt-2016-0049

41. Genik, L.M., McMurtry, C.M., & Breau, L. (2017). Caring for children with cognitive impairments part 1: Experience with the population, pain-related beliefs, and care decisions. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 62, 197-208. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ridd.2017.01.020  

40. Genik, L.M., McMurtry, C.M., & Breau, L. (2017). Caring for children with cognitive impairments part 2: Detailed analyses of respite workers' reported assessment and care decisions. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 63, 1-10. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ridd.2017.01.021

39. Noel, M., McMurtry, C.M., Pavlova, M., & Taddio, A. (accepted Jan 28, 2017). Brief clinical report: A systematic review and meta-analysis of pain memory reframing interventions for children’s needle procedures. Pain Practice, e-pub ahead of print March 14, 2017.  doi: 10.1111/papr.12572  

38. McMurtry, C.M., Tomlinson, R.M., & Genik, L.M. (2017). Cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety and fear in pediatric pain contexts. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, 31(1), 41-56Invited  submission for special issue: “Implementing and adapting behavioral therapies for    anxiety across the lifespan”.

37. Tomlinson, R.M., Cousins, L.A., McMurtry, C.M., & Cohen, L.L. (2017). The power of pain self-efficacy: Applying a positive psychology framework to pediatric pain. Pediatric Pain Letter, 19(1), 9-13. http://childpain.org/ppl/issues/v19n1_2017/v19n1_tomlinson.pdf

36. Constantin, K., McMurtry, C.M., & Bailey, H.N. (2017). Parental cardiac response in the    context of pediatric acute pain: Current knowledge and future directions. Pain Management,  7(2), 81-87. doi:10.2217/pmt-2016-0033

35. Dalley, J., Creary, P., Durzi, T., & McMurtry, C.M. (2016). An Interactive teddy bear clinic tour: Teaching student veterinarians how to interact with young children. Journal of  Veterinary Medical Education, e-pub ahead of print. doi: 10.3138/jvme.1115-180R1.

34. McMurtry, C.M., Taddio A., Noel M., Antony M.M., Chambers C.T., Asmundson G.J.G., Pillai Riddell R., Shah V., MacDonald N.E., Rogers J., Bucci L.M., Mousmanis P., Lang E., Halperin S., Bowles S., Halpert C., Ipp M., Rieder M.J., Robson K., Uleryk E., Votta Bleeker E., Dubey V., Hanrahan A., Lockett D., Scott J. (2016). Exposure-based interventions for the management of individuals with high levels of needle fear across the lifespan: A clinical practice guideline and call for further research. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/16506073.2016.1157204

33. Cousins, L.A., Tomlinson, R.M., Cohen, L.L., & McMurtry, C.M. (2016). The power of optimism: Applying a positive psychology framework to pediatric pain. Pediatric Pain  Letter, 18(1), 1-5.

32. Dalley, J.S., & McMurtry, C.M. (2016). Teddy and I Get a Check-Up: A pilot educational intervention teaching children coping strategies for managing procedural pain and fear. Pain  Research & Management. http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4383967

31. Genik, L.M., McMurtry, C.M., & Breau, L. (2015). Observer perceptions of pain in children with cognitive impairments: vignette development and validation. Pain Management, 5(6),  425-434.

30. Taddio, A., McMurtry, C.M., Shah, V., Pillai Riddell, R., Chambers, C.T., Noel M., & the HELPinKids&Adults Team (2015). Reducing pain during vaccine injections: Clinical practice guideline (summary). Canadian Medical Association Journal, 187(13), 975-982. DOI:10.1503 /cmaj.150391 http://www.cmaj.ca/content/187/13/975  

29. McMurtry, C.M., Noel, M., Taddio, A., Antony, M.M., Asmundson, G.J.G., Pillai Riddell, R., Chambers, C.T., Shah, V. & the HELPinKIDS Team (2015). Interventions for the  management of high levels of needle fear: systematic review of randomized controlled trials  and quasi-randomized controlled trials. Clinical Journal of Pain, 31(10S), 109-123.

28. Pillai Riddell, R., Taddio, A., McMurtry, C.M., Shah, V., Noel, M., Chambers, C.T., & HELPinKids&Adults Team (2015). Process interventions for vaccine injections:  systematic review of randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized controlled trials. Clinical Journal of Pain, 31(10S), 99-108.

27. Shah, V., Taddio, A., McMurtry, C.M., Halperin, S.A., Noel, M., Pillai Riddell, R., Chambers, C.T., & HELPinKids&Adults Team (2015). Pharmacological and combined interventions to reduce vaccine injection pain in children and adults: systematic review and meta-analysis. Clinical Journal of Pain, 31(10S), 38-63.

26. Pillai Riddell, R., Taddio, A., McMurtry, C.M., Chambers, C.T., Shah, V., Noel, M., & HELPinKids&Adults Team (2015). Psychological interventions for vaccine injections in  young children 0 to 3 Years: systematic review of randomized controlled trials and quasi- randomized controlled trials. Clinical Journal of Pain, 31(10S), 64-71.

25. Taddio, A., McMurtry, C.M., Shah, V., Yoon, E., Uleryk, E., Pillai Riddell, R., Lang, E., Chambers, C., Noel, M., MacDonald, N., & HELPinKids&Adults Team (2015). Methodology for knowledge synthesis of the management of vaccination pain and needle   fear. Clinical Journal of Pain, 31(10S), 12-19.

24. Taddio, A., Shah, V., McMurtry, C.M., MacDonald, N., Ipp, M., Pillai Riddell, R., Noel, M., Chambers, C.T. & HELPinKids&Adults Team (2015). Procedural and physical   interventions for vaccine injections: Systematic review of randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized controlled trials. Clinical Journal of Pain, 31(10S), 20-37.

23. McMurtry, C.M., Pillai Riddell, R., Taddio, A., Racine, N., Asmundson, G.J.G., Noel, M., Chambers, C.T., Shah, V. & the HELPinKids&Adults Team (2015). Far from “just a   poke”: common painful needle procedures and the development of needle fear. Clinical Journal of    Pain, 31(10S), 3-11.

22. Birnie, K.A., Chambers, C.T., Taddio, A., McMurtry, C.M., Noel, M., Pillai Riddell, R., Shah, V., & HELPinKids&Adults Team (2015). Psychological interventions for vaccine   injections in children and adolescents: systematic review of randomized and quasi-   randomized controlled trials. Clinical Journal of Pain, 31(10S), 72-89.

21. Noel, M., Taddio, A., McMurtry, C.M., Chambers, C.T., Pillai Riddell, R., Shah, V., & HELPinKids&Adults Team (2015). HELPinKids&Adults knowledge synthesis of      vaccination pain and high levels of needle fear: Limitations of the evidence and  recommendations for future research. Clinical Journal of Pain, 31(10S), 124-131.

20. Boerner, K.E., Birnie, K.A., Chambers, C.T., Taddio, A., McMurtry, C.M., Noel, M., Shah, V., Pillai Riddell, R., & HELPinKids&Adults Team (2015). Simple psychological interventions for reducing pain from common needle procedures in adults: systematic review    of randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials. Clinical Journal of Pain, 31(10S), 90-  98.

19. Taddio, A. & McMurtry, C.M. (2015). Evidence for clinicians: Psychological interventions for needle-related procedural pain and distress in children and adolescents. Paediatrics &  Child Health, 20(4), 195-196.

18. Chorney, J.M., McMurtry, C.M., Chambers, C.T., & Bakeman, R. (2015). Developing and modifying behavioral coding schemes in pediatric psychology: A practical guide. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 40(1), 154-164. doi:10.1093/jpepsy/jsu099

17. Genik, L.M., Yen, J., & McMurtry, C.M. (2015). Historical analysis in pediatric psychology:  The influence of societal and professional conditions on two early pediatric psychology articles and the field's subsequent development. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 40(2), 167-174. doi: 10.1093/jpepsy/jsu084

16. Knoll, A., McMurtry, C.M., & Chambers, C.T. (2013). Pain in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Experience, expression, and assessment. Pediatric Pain Letter, 15, 23-28.

15. Jensen, C.D., Sato, A.F., McMurtry, C.M., Hart, C.N., & Jelalian, E. (2012). School nutrition    policy: An evaluation of the Rhode Island Healthier Beverages policy in schools. ICAN:  Infant, Child, & Adolescent Nutrition, 4, 276-282.

14. Karazsia, B.T., & McMurtry, C.M. (2012). Graduate admissions in pediatric psychology: The  importance of undergraduate training. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 37, 127-135.

13. Buttle, S., McMurtry, C.M., & Marshall, S. (2011). Massage for pain relief in pediatric palliative care: Potential benefits and challenges. Pediatric Pain Letter, 13, 24-29.

12. McMurtry, C.M., Noel, M., Chambers, C.T., & McGrath, P.J. (2011). Children’s fear during procedural pain: Preliminary investigation of the Children’s Fear Scale. Health Psychology, 30, 780-788.

11. Coates, C., McMurtry, C.M., Lingley-Pottie, P., & McGrath, P.J. (2010). The prevalence of painful incidents in young recreational gymnasts. Pain Research and Management, 15, 179-184. 

10. McMurtry, C.M., Chambers, C.T., McGrath, P.J., & Asp, E. (2010). When “don’t worry” communicates fear: Children’s perceptions of parental reassurance and distraction during a painful pediatric medical procedure.  Pain, 150, 52-58.

9. Noel, M., McMurtry, C.M., Chambers, C.T., & McGrath, P.J. (2010). Children’s memory for painful procedures: The influence of pain intensity, anxiety, and adult behaviours on subsequent recall.  Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 35, 626-36.

8. Chambers, C.T., Taddio, A., Uman, L.S., & McMurtry, C.M. (2009). Psychological interventions for reducing pain and distress during routine childhood immunizations: A systematic review. Clinical Therapeutics, 31(Suppl. B), S77-S103. 

7. McMurtry, C.M., Castral, T.C., & Fernandes, A. (2007).  Training health researchers:  Challenges, systemic changes, and a model solution. Pediatric Pain Letter, 9, 21-24.  

6. Schechter, N.L., Zempsky, W.T., Cohen, L.L., McGrath, P.J., McMurtry, C.M., & Bright, N.S. (2007). Pain reduction during pediatric immunizations: Evidence-based review and recommendations. Pediatrics,19, e1184-e1198. 

5. Kelln, B., & McMurtry, C.M. (2007). STEPS - Structured Tactical Engagement Process: A model for crisis negotiation. Journal of Police Crisis Negotiations, 7, 29-51

4. McMurtry, C.M. (2007). Needle and dread – Is it just a little poke? A call for implementation of evidence-based policies for the management of needle pain in clinical settings. Paediatrics & Child Health, 12,101-102.

3. McMurtry, C.M., McGrath, P.J., Asp, E., & Chambers, C.T. (2007). Parental reassurance and pediatric procedural pain: A linguistic description. The Journal of Pain, 8, 95-101.

2. McMurtry, C.M., McGrath, P.J., & Chambers, C.T. (2006). Reassurance can hurt: Parental behavior and painful medical procedures. The Journal of Pediatrics, 148, 560-561.

1. Olds, E.S., & McMurtry, C.M. (2003). Search of jumping items: Visual marking and discrete motion. Perception, 32, 449-462.

Selected Awards

CSAHS Research Excellence Award, 2017-2018
Psychology Department Teaching Award, 2015
Canadian Psychological Association President's New Researcher Award 2012
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Fellowship and Bisby prize (for top rank in the committee; declined) 2010
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Canada Graduate Scholarships Doctoral Research Award 2006