University of Guelph 2001-2002 Undergraduate Calendar

XII--Course Descriptions, Classical Studies

School of Languages and Literatures.

These courses do not require a knowledge of the Greek or Latin languages.

CLAS*1000 Introduction to Classical Culture F,W(3-0). [0.50].

A wide-ranging look at essential features of Greek and of Roman culture and society. Considerable emphasis will be given to the classical views of the human condition.

CLAS*2000 Classical Mythology W(3-0). [0.50].

An examination of the nature and function of myth in Classical Antiquity. The course shows how the narrative and symbolic structure of myths orders individual and communal experience. The myths that have influenced Western civilization receive special emphasis.

CLAS*2150 Art and Archaeology of Greece F(3-0). [0.50].

A survey of Ancient Greek Art and Archaeology, with stress on form and function plus stylistic trends and aesthetic values. The course will illuminate the cultural, social, and political life in Ancient Greece. (Also listed as ARTH*2150).

Exclusion: ARTH*2150

CLAS*2350 The Classical Tradition W(3-0)). [0.50].

This course examines the transmission of Greco-Roman culture in circumstances radically different from those in which it originated. It highlights the aspects of classical culture most influential in forming the Western tradition. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): CLAS*1000 or CLAS*2000

CLAS*2360 The Classical Tradition (in Latin) W(6-0)). [1.00].

This course, which is offered in conjunction with CLAS*2350, adds to the content of that course the reading and study in Latin of certain primary sources, in particular Cicero, Quintilian, Augustine. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): LAT*2000

CLAS*3000 The Rise and Fall of Athens F(3-0). [0.50].

Greek history in the 5th century; the development of Athenian democracy; the Peloponnesian War and the decline of Athenian dominance. Special attention is paid to the literature and thought of the period. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): 1 of CLAS*1000, CLAS*2000, HIST*2850

CLAS*3010 The Roman Revolution W(3-0). [0.50].

An examination of the collapse of the Roman Republic and the development of the Imperial government under Augustus. The paradox of the external power and inner instability of Rome. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): 1 of CLAS*1000, CLAS*2000, HIST*2850

CLAS*3020 History of the Hellenistic World F(3-0). [0.50].

The rise and fall of the Hellenistic states from the death of Alexander the Great until the Roman conquest, with political emphasis on the development of the monarchies and cultural emphasis on the Hellenization of the East. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): 1 of CLAS*1000, CLAS*2000, HIST*2850

CLAS*3030 Epic Heroes and Poems W(3-0). [0.50].

The nature and significance of the epic hero. Epic as code and as critique of tradition. Oral poetry, and critical problems raised by it. The central texts are The Iliad, The Odyssey, and Virgil's Aeneid; other poems are also studied. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): CLAS*1000 or CLAS*2000

CLAS*3040 Greek Tragedy and Comedy W(3-0). [0.50].

The nature of tragedy, and the existential and moral questions raised by the plays of Aischylos, Sophokles, and Euripides. Comedy, fantasy, and society in Aristophanes.(Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): CLAS*1000 or CLAS*2000

CLAS*3050 The Rise and Fall of Athens (in Greek) F(6-0). [1.00].

This course, offered in conjunction with CLAS*3000, augments the content of that course with the reading and study in Greek of selected primary sources, such as Herodotus, Thucydides, and Plutarch. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): GREK*2020

Exclusions: CLAS*3000, CLAS*3001:2

CLAS*3060 The Roman Revolution (in Latin) W(6-0). [1.00].

This course, offered in conjunction with CLAS*3010, augments the content of that course with the reading and study in Latin of selected primary sources, notably Sallust, Cicero, Caesar, and Suetonius.(Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): LAT*2000

Exclusions: CLAS*3010, CLAS*30101:2

CLAS*3070 History of the Hellenistic World (in Greek) F(6-0). [1.00].

This course, offered in conjunction with CLAS*3020, augments the content of that course with the reading and study in Greek of selected Greek sources pertaining to the history of the Hellenistic World, primarily Polybius and Plutarch. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): GREK*2020

Exclusions: CLAS*3020, CLAS*3021:2

CLAS*3080 Epic Heroes and Poems (in Greek) W(6-0). [1.00].

This course, offered in conjunction with CLAS*3030, augments the content of that course with the reading in Greek of selected books from the Iliad and/or Odyssey. The course will include close study of the epic dialect and features of its formulaic language.(Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): GREK*2020

Exclusions: CLAS*3030, CLAS*3031:2

CLAS*3090 Greek Tragedy and Comedy (in Greek) W(6-0). [1.00].

This course, taught together with CLAS*3040, complements the content of that course by the reading and study in Greek of an extant play. Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): GREK*2020

Exclusions: CLAS*3040, CLAS*3041:2

CLAS*3100 Religion in Greece and Rome F(3-0). [0.50].

An examination of the varieties of religious experience and of religious activity in Greece and Rome, before the establishment of Christianity. Particular attention is paid both to the relations of religion to state and to the relations of the individual to gods. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): CLAS*1000 or CLAS*2000

CLAS*3120 Religion in Greece and Rome (in Latin) F(6-0). [1.00].

This course, offered in conjunction with CLAS*3100, supplements that course's content by the reading and study of Latin primary sources. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): LAT*2000

Exclusions: CLAS*3100, CLAS*3101:2

CLAS*3150 Roman Art and Urbanism W(3-0). [0.50].

Introduction to Roman art and urbanism from the Early Republic to the end of the imperial period. The course will survey the developments of Roman art with an emphasis on architecture, sculpture and painting. It will illuminate the development of the urban space in the context of cultural, social and political life. .(Also listed as ARTH*3150)

Exclusions: ARTH*3150, ARTH*3530, ARTH*4500

CLAS*3200 Sport in Antiquity F(3-0). [0.50].

The history of sport in Greece and Rome from Homer to the Caesars, with emphasis on its relationship to religion, education, literature, and community life. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): 1 of CLAS*1000, CLAS*2000, CLAS*2300

CLAS*3750 Greek Myth in the Western Tradition F(3-0). [0.50].

This course will study the functions of Greek myths in the non-Greek cultures which adopted them and so transmitted them to the later general culture of the West. The period to be explored extends from Augustan Rome through the European Middle Ages to the Early Renaissance in Italy. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): CLAS*2000

CLAS*4000 Novel and Romance in Antiquity F(3-0). [0.50].

The historical and formal roots of fiction in the classical prose romances. Special attention is paid to the influence of myth, religion, historiography and ethical biography. Among texts studied are Daphnis and Chloe, Satyricon, and Aithiopika. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): CLAS*3030 or CLAS*3040

CLAS*4010 Novel and Romance in Antiquity (in Latin) F(6-0). [1.00].

This course, which is taught in tandem with CLAS*4000, complements that course's content by the reading and study in Latin of an extant novel.(Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): LAT*2000

Exclusions: CLAS*4000, CLAS*4001:2

CLAS*4150 Research Paper in Classics F,W(3-0). [0.50].

This course is intended to complement courses in specified studies in classics. It engages the student in research and in critical writing, and permits the examination, in depth, of a topic of importance to the discipline and of interest to the student.

Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Classical Studies courses at the 3000 level

CLAS*4400 Seminar in Classics W(3-0). [0.50].

A seminar course complementing courses of specific study in classics. It seeks to define the nature of the discipline, its values and its procedures. Attention will be paid to recent methodological and ideological trends in the discipline.

Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Classical Studies at the 3000 level



Admission inquiries: Admission Services ~ ~ ~ General calendar inquiries: U.P.S.
Last revision: October 18, 2001 (Section IX December 01, 2001; format revision November 20, 2001).

2001 Office of Registrarial Services, University of Guelph