University of Guelph 2001-2002 Undergraduate Calendar

Philosophy

Department of Philosophy.

Note: Specific descriptions of all courses to be offered in a given semester will be available from the Department of Philosophy in each preceding semester. Students are advised to consult these descriptions. Different sections of a course often emphasize different aspects of that course.

PHIL*1000 Introductory Philosophy F,W(3-0). [0.50].

An introduction to philosophy through primary texts in the history of philosophy, with emphasis upon traditional topics such as the nature of knowledge and the different types of knowledge, the relationship between the mind and the body, the nature of good and evil, and the nature of sound argument.

PHIL*1010 Social and Political Issues F,W(3-0) . [0.50].

An introduction to philosophy, with particular emphasis upon important problems facing society today, such as punishment, animal rights, discrimination, war and violence, equality and property and the market as a value system. Some consideration of the elements of argumentation will also occur. (Also offered through distance education format.)

PHIL*1050 Introductory Philosophy: Basic Problems F,W(3-0) . [0.50].

An introduction to philosophy through the exploration of basic perennial philosophical problems and questions, such as whether there is free will, a God, objective right and wrong, genuine knowledge of the world, and other topics. The readings for the course will consist primarily of 20th century philosophical writing. Some consideration of the elements of argumentation will also occur.

PHIL*2030 Philosophy of Medicine F,W(3-0). [0.50].

An examination of philosophical and ethical issues that arise in human and veterinary medicine, including such topics as the definitions of disease and health, the status of medicine as a science, the role of values in medical research and medical practice, the doctor-patient relationship, psychiatry and the control of human behaviour, and the ethics of genetic counselling.

PHIL*2060 Philosophy of Feminism W(3-0). [0.50].

An examination of metaphysical, epistemological and ethical issues in feminist philosophy, including such topics as the nature and consequences of patriarchy, human nature, sexual divisions of labour, women's studies, rationalizations of inequalities and explorations into a contemporary feminist agenda for social, political and economic changes.

PHIL*2070 Philosophy of the Environment W(3-0). [0.50].

A critical examination of a variety of current ways of thinking about the environment, aimed at developing a satisfactory philosophical approach, especially from an ethical perspective. (Also offered through distance education format.)

PHIL*2100 Critical Thinking S,F,W(3-0) . [0.50].

A course designed to develop clarity of thought and method in the analysis and construction of arguments. By contrast to PHIL*2110, the emphasis here is upon informal principles of critical thinking and arguments stated in terms of ordinary language. Topics include the nature and methods of arguing, classification, definition and fallacies.

PHIL*2110 Elementary Symbolic Logic F,W(3-0). . [0.50].

A study of the basic principles and techniques of formal logic. The analysis of the logical structure of sentences and arguments is explored, together with the fundamental principles of elementary sentential logic and quantification.

PHIL*2120 Ethics F,W(3-0). [0.50].

An examination of competing ethical theories (subjectivism, intuitionism, relativism, utilitarianism, egoism, deontologism) with a view to assessing their theoretical value as well as their ability to provide practical guidance and to resolve moral dilemmas. (Also offered through distance education format.)

PHIL*2130 Philosophy of Religion S, F(3-0). [0.50].

A consideration of various philosophical questions concerning religion, such as arguments for the existence of God, the problem of evil, the meaning of religious language, the significance of mystical experience, human immortality. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

PHIL*2140 History of Greek and Roman Philosophy F(3-0) . [0.50].

A survey of Western philosophy from the Pre-Socratics (6th-century, B.C.) to Plotinus (3rd century, A.D.).

PHIL*2180 Philosophy of Science F,W(3-0). [0.50].

An examination of competing theories concerning the nature of science and its modes of inquiry, and the relationship between theories and data and between scientific knowledge and reality. The central problem of the course is the rational basis of scientific knowledge. Special attention will be paid to problems posed by biology.

PHIL*2350 Selected Topics in Philosophy I (3-0) . [0.50].

The topics for this course will vary from one offering to the next, and will deal with material not available in regular courses. Students are advised to consult a departmental advisor before registering.

PHIL*2370 Introduction to Metaphysics W(3-0) . [0.50].

A study of major theories of the nature of reality, and of issues and problems that arise in the investigation of fundamental features of the world. Texts read may be either historical or contemporary. Among possible topics explored in the course are materialism, free will, and determinism, the nature of time, and the position of consciousness in the world.

Prerequisites: one of PHIL*1000, PHIL*1010, PHIL*1050

PHIL*2600 Business and Professional Ethics W(3-0). [0.50].

An examination of ethical and evaluative issues relating to business and professional practices. Topics to be explored include the nature of values and ethical systems, duties and rights, private and public goods, the consumer movement, social marketing, corporate social accounting, private right and professional responsibility. Intended for students registered in a science or professional program, but without a background in philosophy.

Exclusions: PHIL*3600

PHIL*3040 Philosophy of Law F(3-0). [0.50].

An examination of philosophical theories concerning the nature of law and morality. The course may also include an examination of the way in which controversial ethical and social issues are treated under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Prerequisites: 7.50 credits

Exclusions: PHIL*2040

PHIL*3050 Philosophy of Art W(3-0). [0.50].

A consideration of various philosophical questions concerning art such as the nature of a work of art, the nature of beauty, the relationship between the artist and the audience, the task of the art critic, the social function of art.

Prerequisites: 7.50 credits

Exclusions: PHIL*2150

PHIL*3060 Medieval Philosophy W(3-0). [0.50].

A study of philosophy from the Patristic period (3rd century A.D.) to the early Renaissance (14th-century). The ideas of the central figures will be examined through original sources. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisites: 1.50 credits in philosophy

PHIL*3080 History of Modern European Philosophy from Kant F(3-0). [0.50].

A survey of European philosophy from Immanuel Kant (mid-18th century) to the late 19th century.

Prerequisites: 1.50 credits in philosophy

PHIL*3130 Contemporary British and American Philosophy F(3-0). [0.50].

A survey of philosophical movements mainly centred in Britain and America from the late 19th-century to the present.

Prerequisites: 1.50 credits in philosophy including PHIL*2110

PHIL*3170 Intermediate Philosophy of Science W(3-0). [0.50].

A study of more specialized questions posed by the nature of science and its investigation. Topics may include realism and antirealism, naturalized explanations, and other contemporary problems in the philosophy of science.

Prerequisites: PHIL*2180

PHIL*3180 Philosophy of Mind W(3-0). [0.50].

A philosophical examination of fundamental theories and problems concerned with mind, thought, and consciousness. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisites: 1.50 credits in philosophy

PHIL*3190 Theory of Knowledge W(3-0). [0.50].

A survey of traditional discussion of the problems of knowledge. Offered in odd-numbered years.

Prerequisites: 1.50 credits in philosophy

PHIL*3200 Contemporary European Philosophy W(3-0). [0.50].

A survey of philosophical movements mainly centred in continental Europe from the late 19th-century to the present.

Prerequisites: 1.50 credits in philosophy

PHIL*3230 Issues in Social and Political Philosophy W(3-0). [0.50].

A detailed examination of one or more historical or contemporary treatments of specific issues in social or political philosophy, such as: war and peace, justice. rights, social science, culture, education.

Prerequisites: 1.50 credits in philosophy

PHIL*3350 Selected Topics in Philosophy II (3-0). [0.50].

The topics for this course will vary from one offering to the next, and will deal with material not available in regular courses, such as Philosophy of History, Philosophy of Social Science and advanced Philosophy of Religion. Students are advised to consult an academic counsellor before registering.

Restrictions: registration in an honours philosophy program

PHIL*3410 Major Texts in the History of Philosophy W(3-0). [0.50].

A study of central primary sources in ancient, medieval, early modern, or nineteenth-century philosophy. The readings and periods stressed will vary from year to year. Students should consult with the department as to topics to be dealt with in each offering. Specific topics offered will be announced prior to the course selection period.

Prerequisites: 1.50 credits in Philosophy including at least one of PHIL*2140, PHIL*2160, PHIL*3060, PHIL*3080

PHIL*3420 Philosophical Problems of Religion F(3-0). [0.50].

A detailed examination of major problems and writings in the philosophy of religion. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisites: 7.50 credits including 1 of 1.50 credits in Philosophy, PHIL*2130, PHIL*3910, PHIL*3920

PHIL*3910 Indian Philosophy F(3-0) . [0.50].

An analysis of selected primary sources of Indian philosophy in translation, from the Vedic Upanishads to the "integral yoga" of Sri Aurobindo. Emphasis will be on the basic inspirational works of Hinduism and Buddhism, and their respective views on the ultimate nature of reality, the self, suffering, freedom, ignorance and enlightenment.

Prerequisites: 7.50 credits

Exclusions: PHIL*2910

PHIL*3920 Chinese Philosophy W(3-0). [0.50].

An analysis of selected primary sources of Chinese philosophy, in translation, from the I Ching to Mao Tse-tung. Emphasis will be on the foundational works of Confucianism, Taoism, Ch'an (or Zen) Buddhism, and Neo-Confucianism, concerning such issues as the ultimate nature of being, non-being and human destiny, proper government of the self, the family and society, and the principles and practice of enlightenment.

Prerequisites: 7.50 credits

Exclusions: PHIL*2920

PHIL*3930 African Philosophy F(3-0). [0.50].

An introduction to the philosophical traditions of Africa, part historical and part contemporary. The shorter historical section will cover some themes from the thought of ancient Egypt, early Christian and Islamic philosophy in North Africa and precolonial traditions from West Africa. The greater section of the course will deal with philosophical movements in Africa since the 1960's, as well as their implications for African American thought and philosophy generally. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisites: 7.50 credits

PHIL*4110 Symbolic Logic (3-0). [0.50].

A study of issues and techniques beyond the level of elementary sentential logic and quantification. A consideration of some topics in logical theory. An extension of material explored in PHIL*2110, with special focus on philosophical aspects or implications of formal logic.

Prerequisites: PHIL*2110

PHIL*4270 Current Philosophical Issues (3-0). [0.50].

A study of primary philosophical texts since 1965. The focus of the course will alternate between analytic texts and issues and continental texts and issues.

Prerequisites: 2.00 credits in Philosophy

PHIL*4310 Applied Ethics (3-0). [0.50].

An advanced study of specific problems in applied ethics. This is an intensive course designed for philosophy majors as well as for seventh and eighth semester students who have had no previous philosophy course.

PHIL*4320 Value Theory (3-0). [0.50].

An advanced study of problems in social and political philosophy, aesthetics, or general theory of value.

Prerequisites: 1 of PHIL*2120 , PHIL*3050, PHIL*3230

PHIL*4340 Ethics (3-0). [0.50].

An advanced study of problems in contemporary ethics.

Prerequisites: PHIL*2120

PHIL*4360 Epistemology (3-0). [0.50].

An examination of central problems concering the nature of knowledge. In some offerings the selection will emphasize problems in the Philosophy of Language.

Prerequisites: 2.50 credits in Philosophy or PHIL*3190

PHIL*4370 Metaphysics (3-0). [0.50].

An advanced study of problems concerning the nature of reality.

PHIL*4390 Selected Topics in Philosophy III (3-0). [0.50].

Open to honours philosophy students in their 7th and 8th semesters.

PHIL*4400 MajorTexts in Philosophy (3-0). [0.50].

Advanced study of a major text in philosophy not treated in either PHIL*4410 or PHIL*4420.

PHIL*4410 Major Texts in Philosophy (3-0). [0.50].

Advanced study of a major text in philosophy not treated in either PHIL*4400 or PHIL*4420.

PHIL*4420 Major Texts in Philosophy (3-0). [0.50].

Advanced study of a major text in philosophy not treated in either PHIL*4400 or PHIL*4410.

PHIL*4800 Honours Philosophy Research Paper I (3-0). [0.50].

The preparation of a major research paper under the supervision of a faculty member. Normally open only to 7th semester honours philosophy students.

PHIL*4810 Honours Philosophy Research Paper II (3-0). [0.50].

A continuation of PHIL*4800.



Admission inquiries: Admission Services ~ ~ ~ General calendar inquiries: U.P.S.
Last revision: October 18, 2001 (Section IX December 01, 2001; format revision November 20, 2001).

2001 Office of Registrarial Services, University of Guelph