University of Guelph 2001-2002 Undergraduate Calendar

XII--Course Descriptions, Psychology

Department of Psychology.

Students wishing to take a 2000, 3000 or 4000 level course without having completed the appropriate prerequisites, must receive permission of the instructor who will determine whether the student has the required background for the course. Students in all psychology courses will be encouraged to participate in the on-going research of the department.

Honours Courses: courses marked (H) are designed for students in a psychology honours program, the Information Systems and Human Behaviour program, the Developmental Psychology Minor program, the Organizational Behaviour Minor program, the Social Psychology program, the Cognitive Neuropsychology Minor program, Career Development Practitioner program (C.D.P.P.), or Human Resources Management major of the Bachelor of Commerce program. Students in other programs wishing to take these courses must obtain the permission of the instructors concerned. Unless otherwise specified, all other courses may be taken by general, honours, and students from other programs, providing the prerequisites are met. Courses designated with (H) are Honours level courses requiring for registration a cumulative average of at least 70% in all course attempts in Psychology.

Psychology Core: courses marked (C) are Psychology core courses. Students registered in psychology programs are advised to complete at least 2.00 credits of the psychology core at the 2000 level prior to attempting any 3000 level psychology credit other than PSYC*3320 and PSYC*3371/2.

For courses without semester designations, please check with the department. The remaining courses will normally be offered as indicated. Advance schedules are available in the department.

PSYC*1100 Principles of Behaviour S,F,W(3-0). [0.50].

Experimental methods for the study of behaviour. The physiological basis of behaviour, sensory processes and perception. Motivation, learning and memory. (Also offered through distance education format.)

PSYC*1200 Dynamics of Behaviour S,F,W(3-0). [0.50].

Experimental methods for psychological research. Human development, intelligence, thinking and language; personality and behaviour pathology; social psychology. (Also offered through distance education format.)

PSYC*2010 Quantification in Psychology S,F,W(3-0). [0.50].

An introduction to psychological measurement and to statistical principles in psychological research. The course emphasizes descriptive statistics and introduces concepts and techniques of hypothesis testing. Cannot be taken for credit by students with credit in a 2000 level or above course in statistics.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*1100 or PSYC*1200

PSYC*2310 Introduction to Social Psychology S,F,W(3-0) (C). [0.50].

The content and research methods of social psychology will be explored in lectures and seminars. Content includes social perception, attraction, group dynamics, leadership, conflict and cooperation, attitude change, aggression and conformity. (Also offered through distance education format.)

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*1200

PSYC*2330 Principles of Learning F,W(2-2) (C). [0.50].

An introduction to the basic principles and concepts of classical and instrumental conditioning paradigms of learning, via lectures, demonstrations and student projects. Some student projects may involve laboratory practice on animal conditioning. This is normally a priority access course demanding at least a 65% average in each of the two prerequisites. Prerequisites are not waived.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*1100, PSYC*1200

PSYC*2360 Introductory Research Methods S,F,W(2-2). [0.50].

The application of scientific method in psychological experiments with laboratory demonstration.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*1100, PSYC*1200, (PSYC*2010 or STAT*2040)

PSYC*2390 Principles of Sensation and Perception F,W(2-2) (C). [0.50].

The course objective is to consider the processes of sensory inputs and perception. Approaches ranging from psychophysiology and cognitive psychology to physiology and anatomy will be used. In considering the psychology of sensation and perception, some of the anatomical and physiological aspects of selected senses will be covered in detail and the roles of experience, organization of inputs, and theories of perception are discussed. Topics to be emphasized will vary with the instructor, but may include ontogenetic development, learning, and modification of inputs and their perception. Students will participate in laboratory demonstrations and experiments.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*1100

PSYC*2410 Behavioural Basis of Neuroscience, I F,W(2-2) (C). [0.50].

A general introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system. The physiological basis of sensory (input) systems and the motor (output) system are examined as are central physiological bases of processes such as arousal and emotion. Laboratory demonstrations and exercises may be included.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*1100

PSYC*2450 Introduction to Developmental Psychology F,W(3-0) (C). [0.50].

An introduction to and an analysis of the major theories of developmental psychology. Emphasis will be placed on the processes of development in the child including physical growth, perception, cognition, personality and interactions with the social environment. The application of developmental psychology to educational and social issues will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*1100, PSYC*1200

PSYC*2650 Introduction to Cognitive Processes F,W(2-2) (C). [0.50].

An introduction to cognitive processes, including topics in the areas of attention, memory, language and reasoning. Students will be exposed to and participate in laboratory demonstrations and experiments.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*1100

PSYC*2740 Personality S,F,W(3-0) (C). [0.50].

A review of the theory, assessment procedures and research findings pertinent to major personality constructs. Personality research, methodology and design will also be covered. (Also offered through distance education format.)

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*1100, PSYC*1200

PSYC*3020 Psychology of Law (3-0). [0.50].

An examination of psychological methods, findings and theories in the study of law. Topics will include the fallibility of the eyewitness; juror decisional processes; credibility of witnesses and attorneys; socialization into legal systems, police behaviour, etc.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*2310 (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3030 Behavioural Aspects of Drug Action (3-0). [0.50].

An introduction, for social scientists, to the role of biochemical events as they relate to the prediction and control of behaviour. Emphasis is given to the basic principles of drug action, chemical neuro-transmission and the characteristics of behavioral pharmacology.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*1100, (PSYC*2410 or PHRM*3000 or PHRM*3010) (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3040 Current Issues in Neuropsychology (3-0). [0.50].

Major areas of applied brain research and clinical aspects of brain function will be covered. Emphasis will be given to the analysis of psychological deficits following brain damage and to selected aspects of intellectual disabilities.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*1100, PSYC*2410 (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3060 Occupational Health Psychology F,W,S(3-0). [0.50].

The relationship between work, employment and both psychological and physical well-being. The promotion of workplace health through public policy and workplace intervention.

Prerequisite(s): 1 of PSYC*2010, relevant experience (also see psychology core statement), enrolment in the BCOMM Human Resources Management Major

PSYC*3070 Psychology in Human Resource Management (3-0). [0.50].

This course explores the application of psychological theory and measurement in human resources management. A dual perspective is taken: that of the worker impacted by these practices and that of the manager responsible for implementing them. Specific topics include recruitment, personnel selection, performance management, training, and executive assessment, development, and succession. (Also offered through distance education format.)

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*1200 (also see psychology core statement) or enrolment in the BCOMM Human Resources Management Major

Exclusions: PSYC*3510

PSYC*3080 Organizational Psychology (3-0). [0.50].

An examination of current theories and practices in organizational psychology. Selected topics may include motivation, turnover, absenteeism, leadership, job design, work attitudes, organizational justice, and organizational development and change. (Also offered through distance education format.)

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*1200 (also see psychology core statement) or enrolment in the BCOMM Human Resources Management Major

Exclusions: PSYC*3510

PSYC*3100 Evolutionary Psychology (3-0). [0.50].

Evolutionary Psychology (EP) offers a Darwinian frame of reference for studying questions about human nature. After reviewing basic material on genetics and natural selection, we will examine and criticize the contribution of EP to the understanding of the various aspects of individual and social behaviour, such as altruism, logic, mate selection, health, morality, aesthetics, and the role of culture.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*2360 (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3110 Topics in Health Psychology (3-0). [0.50].

This survey course will cover a range of topics within a specific area of Health Psychology. The focal area of the course will depend on who is teaching it but may include: Women's Health (e.g. depression, stress, and aging), Child Health (e.g. eating disorders, chronic illness), and Public and Community Health (e.g. injury prevention, health promotion). The particular focus of the course will be announced prior to the course selection period.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*2310, PSYC*2450 (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3250 Psychological Measurement (3-0) (H). [0.50].

An introduction to the theory of psychological measurement and measurement procedures presently used in psychology. Coverage will include such topics as reliability, validity, test construction; and the measurement of ability, personality, attitudes, interest and achievement.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*2010 (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3300 Topics in the Psychology of Women (3-0). [0.50].

The course will examine the psychology of the female from its historical-theoretical origins to its present status as an area of research.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*1200 and at least 1.00 credits of the psychology core (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3310 Applied Social Psychology (3-0). [0.50].

A number of applied issues will be examined from a social psychological perspective. These may include aggression, prejudice, helping, mental illness, crime and addiction. The format will consist of reading, discussion and research/field projects.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*2310 (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3320 Statistical Principles in Psychological Research F,W(2-2) (H). [0.50].

The course emphasizes inferential tests applied to psychological research. Topics will include: t-tests, analysis of variance, multiple correlation and regression and selected topics in non-parametric statistics. Laboratory sessions will cover statistical application exercises in psychological research.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*2010 or STAT*2040

PSYC*3330 Human Memory (3-1). [0.50].

An examination of theoretical and empirical studies of the psychological nature of the acquisition, storage and retrieval of information. Students will be exposed to and participate in laboratory demonstrations and experiments.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*2650 (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3340 Psycholinguistics (3-1). [0.50].

An introduction to the conceptions of the structure of language as they relate to processes underlying the acquisition, production, perception and understanding of speech, and to empirical studies that bear on these conceptions. Students will be exposed to and participate in laboratory demonstrations and experiments.

Prerequisite(s): LING*1100 or PSYC*2650 (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3371/2 Research Methods F(1-4)/W(1-4) (H). [1.00].

This is a two-semester course in design and data analysis techniques in psychological research. We will focus on the interpretation of data, the evaluation of research plans and the writing of research reports. In the fall semester, the course concentrates on experimental designs; in the winter semester it addresses quasi-experiments, surveys, and other designs. In both semesters, students design and carry out small research projects. This course is for honours psychology students, particularly those who intend to pursue graduate studies in psychology. When students select this course, they will be assigned to PSYC*3371 in the Fall semester and PSYC*3372 in the Winter semester. A grade will not be assigned in PSYC*3371 until PSYC*3372 has been completed.

Prerequisite(s): (PSYC*1100 or PSYC*1200), (PSYC*2010 or STAT*2040), (PSYC*3320 or STAT*2050), PSYC*2360

PSYC*3390 Abnormal Psychology (3-0). [0.50].

Current theory and research in the field of abnormal psychology will be examined in terms of various models (biological, behavioral, social and psychodynamic). Selected topics may include: stress and anxiety, affective disorders, schizophrenia, psychophysiological and personality disorders, and mental health.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*2740 (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3410 Behavioural Basis of Neuroscience II (2-2). [0.50].

This course will focus on contemporary research and theory related to such selected topics as physiological correlates of memory, learning, motivation, emotion, stress, sensory and motor functions. Both the central and peripheral components of the nervous system will be examined in relation to the above. Laboratory demonstrations, exercises and projects may be included.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*2410 (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3430 Topics in Animal Learning and Cognition (3-0). [0.50].

The study of current research in animal cognition, emphasizing such topics as numerical, spatial and logical competence, conceptual abilities, and memory. Seminar presentation and discussion will assume a basic knowledge of operant and Pavlovian conditioning as taught in PSYC*2330.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*2330 (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3440 Cognitive Development (3-0). [0.50].

An examination of theory and research pertaining to children's intellectual development. Topics include children's learning and the development of perception, memory, thinking, and language.

Prerequisite(s): FRHD*2270 or PSYC*2450 (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3450 Social and Personality Development (3-0). [0.50].

An examination of research, methodological issues, and theories concerning personality-social development. Topics may include temperament, imitation, parent-child interaction, and the development of attachments, sex-roles, morality, aggression, and pro-social behaviour.

Prerequisite(s): FRHD*2270 or PSYC*2450 (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3460 Abnormal Development (3-0). [0.50].

Theory, research, and aspects of current practice concerning abnormal psychological development in childhood and adolescence.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*3440 or PSYC*3450 (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3480 Psychology of Sport (3-0). [0.50].

An examination of individual and group behaviour in physical activities and sports. Emphasis will be placed on understanding psychological concepts which are pertinent to sports, e.g., motivation, social and personality development, cognition, leadership and group dynamics.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*1100, PSYC*1200, (PSYC*2310, PSYC*2740) (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3500 Approaches in the Study of Social Interactions (3-0) (H). [0.50].

The course concentrates on social interactions in small groups and dyads. Selected topics will be examined through reading, discussion and student projects. Topics may include: leadership, problem-solving, T-groups, social comparison, friendship, love, privacy, self and identity, nonverbal communication.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*2310 (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3520 Political Psychology (3-0). [0.50].

A social psychological examination of collective behaviours, social movements, and social (policy) change, emphasizing the development and impact of mass media, and relationships with individual, collective and political violence.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*2310 (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3570 The Psychology of Death and Dying (3-0). [0.50].

An examination of theory, research, and issues in the psychology of death and dying. Emphasis is upon the cognitive operations used to process information about death and the influence of death constructs in daily life. Topics include the development of death concepts throughout the life-span, death anxiety in society, the needs of the dying person, the psychology of grieving, and unexpected losses such as deaths by suicide or miscarriage. (Offered through distance education format only.)

Prerequisite(s): 1 of PSYC*2310, PSYC*2740, PSYC*2450, work experience in related fields, permission of the instructor (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3660 Contemporary Psychology (3-0). [0.50].

Some current developments in psychology. Topics will vary with the interests of faculty members assigned to the course and will be announced prior to the course selection period.

Prerequisite(s): previous study related to the topic area (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3680 Selected Topics in Psychology (3-0). [0.50].

This course will highlight current and topical issues in psychology. Topics will vary with the interests of faculty members assigned to the course and will be announced prior to the course selection period.

Prerequisite(s): previous study related to the topic area (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3690 Community Psychology and Community Mental Health (3-0). [0.50].

An introduction to the principles and practices of community mental health and community psychology. The course deals with the application of public health concepts to the field of mental health, the epidemiology of mental disorder in the community, the design and evaluation of preventive programs for populations at risk of illness, and the creation of alternatives to institutional treatment of the mentally ill. Several field visits to community mental health programs will be arranged. This course should be of special interest to students who are planning to pursue careers in such human service fields as social work and occupational therapy.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*2310 (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3710 Psychology of Learning Difficulties and Disabilities I F(3-0). [0.50].

An examination of current theories regarding learning difficulties and disabilities in educational settings. Emphasis will be placed on cognitive, social and motivational factors associated with learning problems and on behavioral and educational remedial approaches.

Prerequisite(s): 1 of FRHD*2270, PSYC*2450, PSYC*2650 (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3720 Psychology of Learning Difficulties and Disabilities II W(3-0). [0.50].

Continuation of PSYC*3710. Students will develop and report on a systematic remedial project involving an underachieving school-age child.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*3710 (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3800 Psychology and Education (3-0). [0.50].

The application of psychological principles and techniques to the study of the educational process.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*1100, (PSYC*1200 or FRHD*2270) (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3850 Intellectual Disabilities (3-0). [0.50].

This course covers applied and theoretical aspects of intellectual disabilities, and lays a foundation for work in the area of intellectual disabilities.

Prerequisite(s): FRHD*2270 or PSYC*2450 (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*3900 Psychology Research Internship F,W,S(0-6). [0.50].

This course provides an experiential learning opportunity through the active participation of the student in a faculty member's ongoing research program. It is expected that students will develop a broader appreciation of the relationship between knowledge, theory and research while acquiring basic skills in research methodologies and modes of inquiry. The course will require involvement in both the practice and reporting of research. The student must consult the supervisory faculty member before selecting or registering for the course.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*1100, PSYC*1200, PSYC*2010 and at least 1.00 credit at the 2000 level of the psychology core

PSYC*3910 Psychology Externship F,W,S(0-6). [0.50].

An independent program of study formally integrating the student's academic study with 1 or more work experiences, to be decided by the student in consultation with the supervisory faculty (normally the department's co-op coordinator) prior to registration in the course. In order to qualify for this course, the student must be employed in a work setting at the time of registration to help ensure that a suitable project is feasible in the context of a work placement or employment. The department is not responsible for obtaining employment. The course project is aimed at making a significant contribution to the work setting. The student must consult with the supervisory faculty before selecting or registering for the course. (Enrolment is limited. Not open to co-op students.)

Prerequisite(s): (PSYC*1100, PSYC*1200, PSYC*2010 and at least 1.00 credit at the 2000 level of the psychology core) or enrolment in the Bachelor of Commerce Program, Human Resources Management Major

PSYC*4310 Advanced Topics in Social Psychology (3-0) (H). [0.50].

An in-depth examination of specific advances in social psychological research, theory, and/or applications. Specific topics, to be announced prior to course selection, will vary according to the interests of the instructor of the course.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*3310 or PSYC*3500 (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*4330 Advanced Topics in I/O Psychology (3-0). [0.50].

Students will examine theoretical and methodological issues in selected topic areas of industrial/organizational psychology. The focal area of the course, or range of industrial/organizational topics covered by the course, will vary depending on instructor. Selected topic areas may include leadership issues, gender issues, human rights issues, recruitment methods and outcomes, functional job analysis and validation methods, job performance criteria and appraisal tools, selection processes and tools, organizational justice, work attitudes, and prejudice and discrimination in the workplace. Specific topic areas will be announced prior to the course selection period.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*3310 or PSYC*3500 (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*4370 History of Psychology (3-0) (H). [0.50].

The historical roots of modern psychology. Students electing to major by completing the Honours Thesis Courses I and II should note that they are expected to also take either PSYC*4900, or this course, prior to, or concurrent with, either PSYC*4870 or PSYC*4880 (see Graduate Advisory Note under Major).

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*3070 or PSYC*3080

PSYC*4400 Cognitive Neuropsychology Seminar (2-2) (H). [0.50].

This course will examine research that aims to explain patterns of impaired and intact cognitive performance seen in brain-injured patients in terms of damage to one or more of the components of a theory or model of normal cognitive functioning. The complementary aim of this course is to draw conclusions about normal, intact cognitive processes from the patterns of impaired and intact capabilities seen in brain-injured patients. Selected topics may include spatial abilities, spoken language production and comprehension, writing, reading, and memory.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*2360 , (1 of PSYC*2390, PSYC*2410, PSYC*2650) (also see psychology core statement)

PSYC*4440 Contemporary Issues in Child Development (2-2) (H). [0.50].

This course is primarily designed for students in the Psychology program whose special interests are developmental. Students will examine theoretical and methodological issues in a specific area of developmental psychology. The course will involve detailed evaluation of selected studies and when appropriate, student research projects.

Prerequisite(s): (PSYC*2360 or PSYC*3371/2), (PSYC*3440 or PSYC*3450)

PSYC*4500 Current Theoretical Issues in Psychology S,F,W(3-0) (H). [0.50].

An independent program of study in topics of current theoretical import in psychology, to be decided by the student in consultation with the supervisory faculty member before the student may select or register for the course.

Prerequisite(s): 4.00 credits in psychology, with at least 1.00 at the 3000 level or above

PSYC*4510 Current Issues in Psychology S,F,W(0-6) (H). [0.50].

The study of issues of current interests in psychology. Topics will vary with the interests of faculty members assigned to the course and will be announced prior to the course selection period. The course is available either as a senior lecture/seminar course with regularly scheduled class times, or as an independent study course with the topic and schedule decided in advance by the student in conjunction with a supervisory faculty member.

Prerequisite(s): 4.00 credits in psychology, with at least 1.00 at the 3000 level or above and previous study related to the topic area (see also psychology core statement)

PSYC*4750 Motivation (3-0) (H). [0.50].

This course examines the topics of motivation and emotion from various subdisciplinary perspectives, adopting a senior seminar format and problem-centred approach.

Prerequisite(s): (6 of the 7 psychology core courses plus PSYC*2360 or PSYC*3371/2) or with instructor consent for students registered in the B.SC. Psychology Major Program

PSYC*4760 Seminar in Personality and Individual Differences (3-0) (H). [0.50].

A course in personality and individual differences intended primarily for honours students in psychology. Emphasis will be placed on a critical analysis of current controversies in the area as well as an in-depth examination of specific advances in the field. Specific topics, to be announced prior to course selection, will vary according to the interests of the instructor of the course.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*2740, PSYC*3250

PSYC*4870 Honours Thesis I. F(3-0) (H). [0.50].

Under individual faculty supervision, students plan, develop, and write a research proposal and prepare an extensive review paper on their area of research. Group sessions are held on research ethics, subject protocols and computer data handling techniques. This course will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Note that enrolment in this course is limited and academic records are used for student selection.

Course registration requires the signature of the Chair of the department's Undergraduate Affairs and Curriculum Committee (UACC). Thie UACC signature is contingent upon the student demonstrating they have obtained a Thesis Supervisor's signature on the department's Thesis Registration Form and have an academic standing appropriate for application to graduate programs (see Graduate Advisory under Major). As well, registration for Honours Thesis I will require that either PSYC*4370 or PSYC*4900 is taken prior to, or concurrent with, either PSYC*4870 or PSYC*4880.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*3371/2, [70% psychology average across (PSYC*2010 or STAT*2040), (PSYC*3320 or STAT*2050), PSYC*3371/2 at the time of registration]

PSYC*4880 Honours Thesis II W(2-10) (H)). [1.00].

A continuation of PSYC*4870. Students conduct research and write an undergraduate thesis under the direction of a faculty member. This course is intended for students in the honours program. Note that registration in this course will require that either PSYC*4370 or PSYC*4900 is taken prior to, or concurrent with, either PSYC*4870 or PSYC*4880.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC*4870, [70% psychology average across (PSYC*2010 or STAT*2040), (PSYC*3320 or STAT*2050), PSYC*3371/2 at the time of registration]

Restriction(s): PSYC*4881:2

PSYC*4900 Psychology Seminar (3-0) (H). [0.50].

Student seminars and discussions will be organized around theoretical and substantive issues in the discipline of psychology. A major objective is to assist advanced undergraduate students to achieve a degree of synthesis of materials studied in their previous psychology courses (also see psychology core statement).

Students electing to Major by completing the Honours Thesis I and II should note that they are expected to also take either PSYC*4370, or this course, prior to, or concurrent with, either PSYC*4870 or PSYC*4880 (see Graduate Advisory under Major).

Prerequisite(s): 4.00 credits in psychology, with at least 1.00 at the 3000 level or above

Restriction(s): registration in a Psychology Major of an Honours program and 14.00 credits

PSYC*4910 Co-operative Education Project I S,F,W(0-6) (H). [0.50].

An independent program of study formally integrating the student's academic study with 1 or more work experiences provided by the co-operative education program, to be decided by the student in consultation with the supervisory faculty. The course is normally to be taken concurrently with a co-operative education work term, with the project preferably aimed at making a significant contribution to the work setting.

Prerequisite(s): 2 co-operative education work terms



Admission inquiries: Admission Services ~ ~ ~ General calendar inquiries: U.P.S.
Last revision: October 18, 2001 (Section IX December 01, 2001; format revision November 20, 2001).

2001 Office of Registrarial Services, University of Guelph