XII. Course Descriptions

Engineering

School of Engineering

Students who are not registered in the B.Eng. degree program may take no more than 3.00 Engineering (ENGG*XXXX) credits.

Some ENGG* courses have priority access restrictions. Enrolment in these courses is restricted to students registered in BENG Degree program. All other students will require a waiver form to be signed by the BENG Program Counsellor.

ENGG*1070 Occupational Health and Safety F (2-0) [0.25]
This course presents the legal implications of occupational health and safety as expressed in the Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety Act, and exposes students to methodologies designed to ensure compliance with the Act. The course stresses safety initiatives and deals with specific safety issues such as noise levels, biosafety, hazardous waste management, safety in the workplace, radiation safety and industrial safety.
Restriction(s): Registration in the BENG Program
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*1100 Engineering and Design I F (2-4) [0.75]
This course provides an introduction to engineering and design. An overview of design processes is covered and students experience a defined, open‐ended design project. Physical design development is emphasized, supplemented by elements of analysis. Engineering communications emphasize the visual form and span engineering drawings across a spectrum of engineering disciplines (2D and 3D, realistic and symbolic). Sketching and computer aided tools are both developed. Written communications (individual and team) focus on design. The practice of professional engineering, ethical principles and the engineer’s role and obligations in society are all introduced. The coursework is team‐based to reflect the practice of engineering and the character of the School of Engineering.
Restriction(s): Registration in the BENG Program
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*1210 Engineering Mechanics I W (3-2) [0.50]
This course presents the fundamental principles of Newtonian mechanics; distributed loading; free body diagrams; rigid body equilibrium; structural analysis; internal loading of structural members; friction; dynamics of particles; linear and angular momentum of rigid bodies; conservation of energy; principles of impulse and momentum, and plane motion of rigid bodies.
Prerequisite(s): MATH*1200, PHYS*1130
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*1500 Engineering Analysis F,W (3-1) [0.50]
This course deals with engineering applications of matrix algebra, vector spaces and computer techniques to solve linear systems. Topics include theory and applications of linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization, complex-variable algebra, and multi-variable functions.
Restriction(s): MATH*1160, MATH*2150, MATH*2160
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*2100 Engineering and Design II F,W (2-4) [0.75]
This course is a progression in engineering design skills with particular emphasis on computer usage in design, oral communication of solutions and team skills. Computer usage in design will include advanced CAD/CAM/CAE tools; and database management software. An introduction to safety in engineering practice and design, and the concept of sustainable development are covered.
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 4.0 credits including ENGG*1100
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*2120 Material Science F,W (3-2) [0.50]
Study of the mechanical, electrical, magnetic, optical and thermal properties of solids. Atomic order and disorder in solids, single-phase metals, and multiphase materials (their equilibria and micro-structure) are examined as a basis for understanding the causes of material properties. Interwoven throughout the course is an introduction to materials selection and design considerations.
Prerequisite(s): CHEM*1040, PHYS*1130
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*2130 Introduction to Environmental Engineering F (1.5-3) [0.50]
This course introduces the field of environmental engineering, including minimizing the negative effects of human activities, responsible resource use and recovery, and remediation of soil, water and air pollution. Students will explore relevant ethical issues as well as regulations and policies in diverse areas of environmental engineering. Skills development integrated throughout the course elements will emphasize writing, teamwork, the collaborative nature of the field, engineering tools used in environmental engineering, and data management and analysis.
Offering(s): First offering - Fall 2020
Prerequisite(s): 4.00 credits
Restriction(s): Registration in BENG.ENVE or BENG.ENVE:C.
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*2160 Engineering Mechanics II F (3-1) [0.50]
Fundamental principles of the mechanics of deformable materials; stress and strain; Mohr's circle for transformation of stress and strain; deflection under load; design of beams, shafts, columns and pressure vessels; failure theory and design.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*1210, ENGG*1500, 0.50 credits in calculus
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*2180 Introduction to Manufacturing Processes W (3-2) [0.50]
This course is designed to provide students with an overview of a wide variety of manufacturing processes involved in industrial activities. While most of the manufacturing processes are to be introduced during the course, more emphasis will be given on those processes which are more common in industry, namely material removal processes, casting, and forming. In addition to introducing the various manufacturing process, mathematical models and several empirical data and equations describing the various manufacturing processes will be covered in order to provide the students with a better understanding of the relations between the parameters involved.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2160
Co-requisite(s): ENGG*2120
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*2230 Fluid Mechanics F,W (3-2) [0.50]
Analysis of steady ideal and viscous fluid flow systems using the Continuity, Bernoulli and Momentum equations. Boundary layer theory is treated in terms of viscous and pressure drag, lift and its importance in heat and mass transfer. Dimensional analysis and dynamic similitude are studied to provide an understanding of flow systems analysis and modeling. Introduction to pipe flow and open channel flow.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*1210, MATH*1210
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*2340 Kinematics and Dynamics W (3-2) [0.50]
The course will cover kinematic and dynamic analysis including graphical and analytical methods for kinematic analysis of space, mechanisms and elementary body motion in space, static and dynamic force analyses of mechanisms, gyroscopic forces, dynamics of reciprocating and rotating machinery, cam and gear mechanisms and specifications.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*1210
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*2400 Engineering Systems Analysis F (3-1) [0.50]
Analytical description and modeling of engineering systems such as mechanical, electrical, thermal, hydraulic, biological and environmental systems. Applications of multivariable calculus, linear algebra and differential equations to simulate and analyse such systems.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*1210, ENGG*1500, MATH*1200, MATH*1210, PHYS*1130
Co-requisite(s): MATH*2270
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*2410 Digital Systems Design Using Descriptive Languages F (3-3) [0.50]
Review of Boolean algebra and truth tables, Karnaugh maps. Design, synthesis and realization of combinational circuits. Design, synthesis and realization of sequential circuits. VHDL: structural modeling, data flow modeling, synchronous & asynchronous behavior descriptions, algorithmic modeling. Designing with PLDs. Digital design with SM charts. Designing with PGAs and complex programmable logical devices. Hardware testing and design for testability. Hierarchy in large designs. The course will primarily be concerned with the design of multi-input, multi-output digital controllers which provide the central control signals that orchestrate the collection of hardware devices (from SSI to VLSI) found in a digital system. An introduction to FPGA-based, as well as microprocessor-based digital systems design will be given. Design examples will include systems such as UART, microcontroller CPU, ALU and data acquisition system.
Prerequisite(s): (CIS*1650 or CIS*1500), PHYS*1130
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*2450 Electric Circuits W (3-2) [0.50]
This course explores the fundamentals of electric circuit analysis. Course topics include: lumped circuit abstraction; circuit elements and their characteristics; nodal and mesh analysis; linearity and superposition principles; fundamental circuit theorems; Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits; introduction to the ideal operational amplifier and operational-amplifier circuits; dynamics of first and second order circuits including switched circuits; coupled inductors and transformers; alternate-current circuits and sinusoidal steady-state analysis with phasor methods.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2400, PHYS*1010
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*2550 Water Management W (3-0) [0.50]
The influence of fundamental engineering and hydrologic principles on the choices available for management of water on a watershed basis is demonstrated for representative techniques used in management for water supply, irrigation, flood control, drainage and water pollution control. Selected problems are studies to reveal the technical, environmental, legal, jurisdiction, political, economic and social aspects of water management decisions.
Prerequisite(s): 5.00 credits including CHEM*1040
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*2560 Environmental Engineering Systems W (3-2) [0.50]
Analysis techniques for natural and engineered systems including chemical, physical and biological processes. Mass balance analysis for steady state and unsteady state situations. Analysis under both equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. Reactor types including batch, plug-flow, CSTR. Noise pollution, control and prevention.
Prerequisite(s): CHEM*1050, MATH*2270
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*2660 Biological Engineering Systems I W (3-1) [0.50]
This course deals with the mathematical description and identification of biological systems through: mass and energy balances; reactions in biological systems; and applications in biomedicine, food and bioprocessing.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2400, MATH*2270, (1 of BIOL*1070, BIOL*1080, BIOL*1090)
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3050 Embedded Reconfigurable Computing Systems F (3-2) [0.50]
This course introduces the students to the analysis, synthesis and design of embedded systems and the implementation of embedded systems using Field Programmable Gate Arrays. Topics include: review of digital design concepts; Programmable Logic Devices; Field Programmable Logic Devices; physical design automation (partitioning, placement and routing); Hardware Descriptive Languages; VHDL; Verilog; High Level Languages; System-C; Handle-C; Fixed Point and Floating Point Arithmetic; Hardware Accelerators; Reconfigurable Instruction Set Computers; Hardware Software Co-design techniques; Application of Field Programmable Logic in Embedded Systems.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2410, ENGG*3380
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3070 Integrated Manufacturing Systems F (3-2) [0.50]
Common production machines and manufacturing systems are dealt with, particularly automated systems, robotics, computer control and integration techniques, materials handling, inspection processes and process control. The course addresses societal and environmental issues related to manufacturing.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2120
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3080 Energy Resources & Technologies F (3-2) [0.50]
The challenges of changing the global energy system to reduce dependence on finite fossil energy sources, and transition to environmentally sustainable energy sources, are examined. The reserves, consumption, applications and environmental and human impacts of oil, coal and natural gas usage are examined. The fundamental principles, applications and status of a range of renewable energy sources and technologies will be covered to provide a solid background for further study of sustainable energy.
Co-requisite(s): ENGG*3260
Restriction(s): ENGG*2030
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3100 Engineering and Design III W (3-2) [0.75]
This course combines the knowledge gained in the advanced engineering and basic science courses with the design skills taught in ENGG*1100 and ENGG*2100 in solving open-ended problems. These problems are related to the student's major. Additional design tools are presented, including model simulation, sensitivity analysis, linear programming, knowledge-based systems and computer programming. Complementing these tools are discussions on writing and public speaking techniques, codes, safety issues, environmental assessment and professional management. These topics are taught with the consideration of available resources and cost.
Prerequisite(s): Registration in the BENG program and completion of 6.00 credits of ENGG courses including ENGG*2100
Restriction(s): Students must have a minimum cumulative average of 60% or higher in ALL ENGG courses. Restriction waiver requests are handled by the Director, School of Engineering, or designate.
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3120 Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing W (3-2) [0.75]
The course presents the elements of solid modelling, creation of parts of increasing complexity and the assembly of parts to form a final design, along with mechanism simulation. The operation and programming of CNC machines is covered.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2100, ENGG*3280
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3130 Modelling Complex Systems W (3-2) [0.50]
This course explores the application of systems thinking to complex global issues. Key topics will include: systems theory, complex adaptive systems, systems tools, and systems approaches. The course will emphasize the role of computational modelling and simulation as a central tool for applying systems thinking to real-world settings.
Prerequisite(s): CIS*1500, ENGG*2400, STAT*2120
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3140 Mechanical Vibration F (3-3) [0.50]
This course will provide students with an introduction to the fundamental concepts of vibration engineering using both single and multiple degrees of freedom concepts. The free and forced response of these systems will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on the design of vibration suppression and isolation of mechanical systems. Concepts of natural frequencies and mode shapes and their significance in the solution of multiple degrees of freedom problems will be covered. Vibration of rotating machinery, balancing, condition monitoring, and predictive vs. preventative maintenance philosophies will be introduced.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2340, MATH*2270
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3150 Engineering Biomechanics F (3-2) [0.50]
The following topics related to biomechanics are covered in this course: kinematic and kinetic analysis techniques; electromyography; current techniques in laboratory instrumentation and biomedical applications.
Prerequisite(s): 4.00 ENGG credits, including ENGG*1210
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3160 Biological Engineering Systems II F (3-2) [0.50]
Mass transfer in biological systems: concepts; gas-liquid mass transfer; membrane transport processes; and heterogeneous reactions. Applications may include fermenter aeration, tissue perfusion, mass transfer limitations in biofilms, microbial flocs and solid tumours, protein recovery and drug delivery.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2230, ENGG*2660
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3170 Biomaterials W (3-2) [0.50]
Physical properties of natural and synthetic (e.g. stainless steel, polymers) materials used in biological engineering applications are presented in this course. Topics will include microstructure and mechanical properties of typical biomaterials, quantification of advanced material properties and behaviours, fabrication, compatibility, biodegradation and mechanical failure. Typical applications will include processing of biomaterials as well as equipment and implant design.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2120
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3180 Air Quality F (3-2) [0.50]
The study of the transport, transformation and deposition processes associated with air pollutants. The chemical and biological nature, impacts, and sources of air pollutants. The physical aspects of the atmospheric boundary layer. The mathematical treatment of diffusion in a homogeneous field in a boundary layer. Regulatory approaches worldwide and their use of air quality modeling. The use of models for the design of stacks and monitoring networks.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2230, (ENGG*2560 or ENGG*2660)
Co-requisite(s): ENGG*3260
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3190 Logic Synthesis W (3-2) [0.50]
This course presents automatic logic synthesis techniques for computer-aided design (CAD) of very large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits and systems. Topics covered are: two-level Boolean network optimization, multi-level Boolean network optimization, technology mapping for library-based designs and field-programmable gate-array (FPGA) designs, and state-assignment and re-timing for sequential circuits. The course will also cover various representations of Boolean functions such as binary decision diagrams (BDDs) and discuss their applications to logic synthesis.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2410
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3210 Communication Systems W (3-2) [0.50]
This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of data communication and computer networking. The data communication basics will cover signal transmission and signal encoding techniques such as: multiplexing techniques, signaling, encoding and decoding, error detection and recovery, sliding window techniques. Computer networking basics will cover: communication network components and topologies, multiple access design issues and performance analysis, switching, routing, services and applications, and security. The course will also cover the mathematical tools (Fourier transform, etc.) used in signal analysis.
Prerequisite(s): MATH*2130, STAT*2120
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3220 Groundwater Engineering W (3-2) [0.50]
This is an introductory course in groundwater engineering, an important area of practice for water resource and environmental engineers. The main goals of the course are: (1) to teach engineering students fundamental concepts in applied quantitative hydrogeology; and (2) to provide understanding of practical engineering tools and approaches for analysis including field and lab work.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2230
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3240 Engineering Economics F (3-0) [0.50]
This course covers the principles of project evaluation; analysis of capital and operating costs of engineering alternatives, benefit-cost ratio; break-even studies, evaluations recognizing risk, replacement and retirement of assets; tax considerations, influence of sources of funds.
Offering(s): Also offered through Distance Education format.
Prerequisite(s): MATH*1210
Restriction(s): Registration in the Engineering program.
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3250 Energy Management & Utilization W (3-2) [0.50]
This course introduces notions of energy conservation and efficiency, an integrated approach to energy auditing and examples of typical applications (examples include: steam generation and distribution, process or comfort cooling, pumping and compressed air, human needs for modern living, energy consumption in buildings and industry). It also covers pinch technology and its application for energy recovery in industry, and methods to achieve low energy buildings.
Co-requisite(s): ENGG*3430
Restriction(s): ENGG*3030
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3260 Thermodynamics F (3-2) [0.50]
This course covers macroscopic thermodynamics and its applications to engineering practice. Topics include properties of pure substances and equilibrium, the First Law of thermodynamics (energy transfer and energy balance in closed and flow systems), the Second Law of thermodynamics and its applications (entropy analysis of closed and flow systems, quantification of irreversibilities and inefficiencies, quality of energy, etc.), thermodynamic cycles and exergy.
Prerequisite(s): CHEM*1040, ENGG*2230, ENGG*2400, MATH*2270
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3280 Machine Design F (3-3) [0.75]
This course provides the concepts, procedures, and analysis techniques necessary to design various mechanical elements commonly found in machines. Failure analysis such as yield criteria and fatigue are covered. Component design includes screws, fasteners, shafts, bearings and lubrication, and gears. The emphasis is on the use of readily available materials, standard component, and appropriate design approaches to achieve safe and efficient system design.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2120, ENGG*2160, ENGG*2230, ENGG*2340, ENGG*2450
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3340 Geographic Information Systems in Environmental Engineering F (3-0) [0.50]
Geographical information system structure and functions. Data structuring and application program development. Data input, display and analysis. Applications in environmental engineering and natural resource development/management. Students will be able to use a GIS software package to build geographical information systems.
Prerequisite(s): (CIS*1500 or CIS*1600), (1 of MATH*1000, MATH*1080, MATH*1200)
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3370 Applied Fluids and Thermodynamics W (3-2) [0.50]
This course builds on the fundamentals of fluid dynamics and thermodynamics introduced in previous courses by looking at relevant applications. Topics to be covered include: heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC); heat engine systems such as the Carnot cycle for refrigeration and heat pumps and the Rankine cycle for vapour power systems; compressible flow, turbomachinery such as pumps, turbines, and propellers; and an introduction to combustion.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2230, ENGG*3260
Co-requisite(s): ENGG*3430
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3380 Computer Organization and Design W (3-2) [0.50]
This course contains a detailed examination of modern computer organization and techniques for microprocessor architecture design. Topics include - CPU design; instruction set design, addressing modes, operands; data flow design: internal bus structure, data flow signals, registers; control sequence design: hardwired control, decoding, microprogramming; architecture classes: CISC, RISC, and DSP; Memory organization; performance. Students must complete a term project that includes design, implementation, and demonstration of a CPU using a hardware descriptive language like VHDL.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2410
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3390 Signal Processing F (3-2) [0.50]
This course will establish the fundamental analysis and design techniques for signal processing systems. Topics covered include: definition and properties of linear time-invariant systems; impulse response and convolution; continuous-time Laplace transform, Fourier series, Fourier transform; discrete-time Fourier transform, discrete-time Fourier series, fast Fourier transform, Z transform; complex frequency response; filter analysis and design for both continuous and discrete time systems. Students will be able to design continuous-time filters and both design and implement discrete-time digital filters using computer-based tools.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2400
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3410 Systems and Control Theory W (3-2) [0.50]
Modeling, performance analysis and control with potential application to engineering, physical and biological systems. Topics include modeling in time, Laplace and frequency domains. Performance and stability by methods of Hurwitz, Routh, Bode, and Nyquist. Control by ON/OFF and PID Controllers.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2400, MATH*2270
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3430 Heat and Mass Transfer W (3-1) [0.50]
Analysis of steady and transient thermal systems involving heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation and of mass transfer by molecular diffusion and convection. Other topics include the thermal analysis of heat exchangers and heat transfer systems involving a change of state.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2230, ENGG*3260, MATH*2270
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3450 Electronic Devices F (3-2) [0.50]
This course explores the theory and principles of modern electronic devices and their applications in circuits. Course topics include: intrinsic and doped semiconductors; drift and diffusion currents; metal-semiconductor contacts and MOS capacitors; pn junctions and breakdown phenomena; solid-state diodes; bipolar and MOS field-effect transistors; current-voltage characteristics and biasing; small-signal models and operation; circuit integration; analysis and design of application circuits, operational transconductance amplifiers, and logic gates.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2450
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3470 Mass Transfer Operations W (3-2) [0.50]
Application of mass transfer principles in natural and engineered systems. Mass transport in the multi-media fate of contaminants in and between air, water and land. Design and analysis of separation processes for emission and pollutant prevention.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2230, ENGG*3260, MATH*2270
Co-requisite(s): ENGG*3430
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3490 Introduction to Mechatronic Systems Design W (3-2) [0.75]
This course covers the design of mechatronic systems, which are synergistic, combinations of components and controls drawn from mechanical engineering, electronics, and computer engineering. The course covers the following areas: (1) modeling of mechatronic systems (mechanical, electrical/electronic systems) and understanding their behaviour, (2) sensing and measurement including a variety of mechatronics sensors (fundamentals and applications), (3) actuators specific to mechatronics including motors and drivers (fundamentals and applications), (4) basic microcontroller programming as well as sensor/actuator integrations, and (5) control and its applications in mechatronics.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2340, ENGG*2450
Co-requisite(s): ENGG*3410
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3510 Electromechanical Devices F (3-3) [0.50]
The aim of this course is to develop an understanding of the electrical and electromechanical principles and their applications as devices used in engineering. The course covers magnetic fields of currents and coils; magnetic materials; magnetic circuits; induced, electric and magnetic fields (EMF), inductance, transformers magnetic forces, permanent magnets and electromagnets. The course examines the principles of variable-reluctance devices, stepper motors, moving-coil devices, direct current (DC) and alternating current (AC) motors. Semiconductors materials and devices, diodes, and transistors; principles of modern electronic devices and their applications in circuits; as well as operational amplifiers and digital logics are also studied.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2450, PHYS*1010
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3570 MEMS and Microfabrication F (3-2) [0.50]
This course presents a broad survey of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) and microfabrication technologies. It covers silicon and non-silicon microfabrication techniques for microsensors, microactuators, and nanotechnology. It introduces CAD tools and mechanical and electrical issues in designing devices such as micromotors, grippers, accelerometers, and pressure sensors. It discusses limitations and challenges in design and fabrication of MEMS and enables the application of general micromachining principles to developing novel devices.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2450, PHYS*1010
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3590 Water Quality F (3-3) [0.50]
This course builds on the student's experience in chemistry, biology, physics and fluid mechanics, and provides an engineering perspective on: (i) standard methods of water quality analysis for physical, chemical and biological characteristics of water; (ii) significance and interpretation of analytical results, (iii) modeling of water quality in natural systems and (iv) introduction to engineered water and wastewater treatment systems.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2230, ENGG*2560, (1 of BIOL*1040, BIOL*1090, MICR*1020, MICR*2420), STAT*2120
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3640 Microcomputer Interfacing F (3-3) [0.50]
This course focuses on the subject of interfacing microcomputers to external equipment. Topics include peripheral devices, hardware interfaces, device driver software and real time programming. Advanced programming: debugging of embedded systems, data structures and subroutine calls, high-level system programming. Interrupts and resets, real time events, signal generation and timing measurements. Synchronous and asynchronous serial communication. Parallel I/O ports and synchronization techniques. I/O interfacing, microcomputer busses, memory interfacing and direct memory access (DMA). Data acquisition topics include signal conditioning analog to digital conversion and digital signal processing.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2410, ENGG*2450
Restriction(s): ENGG*4640
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3650 Hydrology F (3-1) [0.50]
Quantitative study of natural water circulation systems with emphasis on basic physical principles and interrelationships among major processes; characteristics of mass and energy; inputs to and output from watersheds; factors governing precipitation occurrence, evaporation rates, soil-water storage changes, groundwater recharge and discharge, run-off generation; methods of streamflow analysis; mathematical modeling.
Prerequisite(s): (ENGG*2230 or MET*2030), (MATH*1210 or MATH*2080), (STAT*2120 or STAT*2040), and competency in computing.
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3670 Soil Mechanics F (3-2) [0.50]
Relations of soil physical and chemical properties to strength; soil water systems and interactive forces. Visco-elastic property and pressure-volume relationships of soil systems. Stress-strain characteristics of soil under dynamic loads. Application of engineering problems. Laboratory and field investigation methods.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2120, ENGG*2230
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3700 Optimization for Engineers F (3-2) [0.50]
This course serves as an introduction to optimization. Topics to be covered include but are not limited to: linear programming, sensitivity analysis, linear integer programming technique, dynamic programming, Markov chains, transportation method, decision analysis, and queuing theory.
Prerequisite(s): CIS*1500, MATH*2130, MATH*2270
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*3830 Bio-Process Engineering F (3-1) [0.50]
Application of engineering principles to the processing of biological products in the biological and food industry. Analysis and design of unit processes such as sedimentation, centrifugation, filtration, milling and mixing involving rheology and non-Newtonian fluid dynamics of biological materials. Analysis of heat and mass balances for drying evaporation, distillation and extraction.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2230, ENGG*2660
Co-requisite(s): ENGG*3260
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4000 Proposal for Engineering Design IV S,F (0-0) [0.00]
In this course students will prepare a proposal for the design project that will be completed in the Engineering Design IV course in their program of study. Teams normally of 3 to 4 students (single student groups not allowed) will prepare the proposal, providing details on the proposed project, identify the group members and identify the faculty adviser, who has a P.Eng.. Students are responsible for creating their own design group and securing a faculty advisor.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*3100
Restriction(s): Registration in the semester preceding the last semester of the BENG Program. Instructor consent required. Restriction waiver requests are handled by the Director, School of Engineering, or designate.
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4030 Manufacturing System Design W (3-3) [0.75]
Students work in groups to design a manufacturing system to produce a specific product. Choices must be made about the materials to be used, the methods to manufacture each part of the product and the final assembly and/or packaging process. Attention is paid to economics and efficiency of the overall manufacturing system.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2180, ENGG*3070
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4040 Medical Imaging Modalities F (3-2) [0.50]
The course will cover the basic knowledge of medical imaging systems, how they operate and to what uses they can be applied. Systems covered will include x-ray radiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, gama cameras, and ultrasound imaging. Emphasis will be on the underlying physics and computation, highlighting factors affecting image quality, patient safety, and clinical use.
Prerequisite(s): MATH*1210, PHYS*1130
Restriction(s): Restricted to students in BENG, BSCH.BMPH
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4050 Quality Control W (3-2) [0.50]
The basic techniques and regulations surrounding quality control in a generic manufacturing environment are covered. The topics covered include: total quality management including relevant ISO regulations, six sigma, reliability, statistical process control, acceptance sampling and 2k factorial design of experiments.
Prerequisite(s): STAT*2120
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4060 Biomedical Signals Processing W (3-2) [0.50]
This course will cover the generation of biomedical signals, detection and measurement, and processing. The physiology of electrical signal generation will cover ionic transport in cellular membranes and propagation of electrical signals in cells and tissues. The range of biomedical signals covered includes such common signals as the electromyogram (EMG), the electrocardiogram (ECG), the electroencephalogram (EEG). Detection and measurement will cover electrode technology, instrumentation amplifiers and safety concerns. Processing includes filtering, frequency content analysis, removal of artifacts, signal correlation, and event detection.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*3390
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4070 Life Cycle Assessment for Sustainable Design W (3-2) [0.50]
This course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts related to interaction of industrial and environmental/ecological systems, sustainability challenges facing the current generation, and systems-based approaches required to create sustainable solutions for society. Students will understand the concepts and the scientific method as it applies to a systems-based, transdisciplinary approach to sustainability, and will be prepared to identify problems in sustainability and formulate appropriate solutions based on scientific research, applied science, social and economic issues. The basic concepts of life cycle assessment (LCA) will be discussed, along with life cycle inventory (LCI) and life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) including the social and economic dimensions. The application of life cycle assessment methodology using appropriate case studies will be presented.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2100, ENGG*3240
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4080 Micro and Nano-Scale Electronics F (3-2) [0.50]
The purpose of this course is to describe the operating principles of analog integrated micro and nano electronic circuits and to teach how to design and use such circuits systems. Course topics include: device and circuit fabrication in silicon and non-silicon based technologies; operation and layout of active and passive elements; analog and switched-capacitor filters; analog-to-digital and digital-toanalog converters; amplifiers; oscillators and circuits for radio-frequency and optical communications; readout channels for integrated sensors, and analog integrated circuits for mechatronics and bioengineering. The main emphasis is on device models, circuit operation, and design techniques.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*3450
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4090 Food and Beverage Engineering W (3-3) [0.75]
Students work in groups to design a system for manufacturing a specific food or beverage product. Choices are made about the specific processes to be used, the final packaging and marketing of the product. Attention is paid to the economics and efficiency of the overall production process.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*3070, ENGG*3510, MICR*1020
Co-requisite(s): ENGG*2660, ENGG*4050, ENGG*4280
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4110 Biological Engineering Design IV F,W (2-6) [1.00]
This is the capstone design course for the Biological Engineering program. Teams normally of 3-4 students apply engineering analysis and design principles to a problem in a biological system or process. A completely specified solution at the level of preliminary or final design is required, including assessment of socio-economic and environmental impact. This is a small group design that requires reports and a poster presentation to a professional standard. Ethics and legal case studies relevant to professional engineering practice are presented during the lectures. Only students currently registered in ENGG*4000 will be permitted to select this course.
Prerequisite(s): All 1000 and 2000 level core courses and ENGG*4000
Restriction(s): Registration in semester 8 (last semester) of the BENG program and in a maximum of 3.25 credits registration. Students must have a minimum cumulative average of 60% or higher in ALL ENGG courses. Restriction waiver requests are handled by the Director, School of Engineering, or designate.
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4120 Engineering Systems and Computing Design IV F,W (2-6) [1.00]
This is the capstone design course for the Engineering Systems and Computing program. Teams normally of 3-4 students apply engineering analysis and design principles to a problem involving control system, computer hardware or computer software technology. A completely specified solution at the level of preliminary or final design is required, including assessment of socio-economic and environmental impact. This is a small group design that requires reports and a poster presentation to a professional standard. Ethics and legal case studies relevant to professional engineering practice are presented during the lectures. Only students currently registered in ENGG*4000 will be permitted to select this course.
Prerequisite(s): All 1000 and 2000 level core courses and ENGG*4000
Restriction(s): Registration in semester 8 (last semester) of the BENG program and in a maximum of 3.25 credits registration. Students must have a minimum cumulative average of 60% or higher in ALL ENGG courses. Restriction waiver requests are handled by the Director, School of Engineering, or designate.
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4130 Environmental Engineering Design IV F,W (2-6) [1.00]
This is the capstone design course for the Environmental Engineering program. Teams normally of 3-4 students apply engineering analysis and design principles to an environmental engineering problem. A completely specified solution at the level of preliminary or final design is required, including assessment of socio-economic and environmental impact. This is a small group design that requires reports and a poster presentation to a professional standard. Ethics and legal case studies relevant to professional engineering practice are presented during the lectures. Only students currently registered in ENGG*4000 will be permitted to select this course.
Prerequisite(s): All 1000 and 2000 level core courses and ENGG*4000
Restriction(s): Registration in semester 8 (last semester) of the BENG program and in a maximum of 3.25 credits registration. Students must have a minimum cumulative average of 60% or higher in ALL ENGG courses. Restriction waiver requests are handled by the Director, School of Engineering, or designate.
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4150 Water Resources Engineering Design IV F,W (2-6) [1.00]
This is the capstone design course for the Water Resources Engineering program. Teams normally of 3-4 students apply engineering analysis and design principles to a problem involving water resources or wastewater engineering. A completely specified solution at the level of preliminary or final design is required, including assessment of socio-economic and environmental impact. This is a small group design that requires reports and a poster presentation to a professional standard. Ethics and legal case studies relevant to professional engineering practice are presented during the lectures. Only students currently registered in ENGG*4000 will be permitted to select this course.
Prerequisite(s): All 1000 and 2000 level core courses and ENGG*4000
Restriction(s): Registration in semester 8 (last semester) of the BENG program and in a maximum of 3.25 credits registration. Students must have a minimum cumulative average of 60% or higher in ALL ENGG courses. Restriction waiver requests are handled by the Director, School of Engineering, or designate.
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4160 Mechanical Engineering Design IV F,W (2-6) [1.00]
This is the capstone design course for the Mechanical Engineering program. Teams normally of 3-4 students apply engineering analysis and design principles to a mechanical engineering problem. A completely specified solution at the level of preliminary or final design is required, including assessment of socio-economic and environmental impact. This is a small group design that requires reports and a poster presentation to a professional standard. Ethics and legal case studies relevant to professional engineering practice are presented during the lectures. Only students currently registered in ENGG*4000 will be permitted to select this course.
Prerequisite(s): All 1000 and 2000 level core courses and ENGG*4000
Restriction(s): Registration in semester 8 (last semester) of the BENG program and in a maximum of 3.25 credits registration. Students must have a minimum cumulative average of 60% or higher in ALL ENGG courses. Restriction waiver requests are handled by the Director, School of Engineering, or designate.
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4170 Computer Engineering Design IV F,W (2-6) [1.00]
This is the capstone design course for the Computer Engineering program. Teams of normally 3-4 students apply engineering analysis and design principles to a computer engineering problem. A completely specified solution at the level of preliminary or final design is required, including assessment of socio-economic and environmental impact. This is a small group design that requires reports and a poster presentation to a professional standard. Ethics and legal case studies relevant to professional engineering practice are presented during the lectures. Only students currently registered in ENGG*4000 will be permitted to select this course.
Prerequisite(s): All 1000 and 2000 level core courses and ENGG*4000
Restriction(s): Registration in semester 8 (last semester) of the BENG program and in a maximum of 3.25 credits registration. Students must have a minimum cumulative average of 60% or higher in ALL ENGG courses. Restriction waiver requests are handled by the Director, School of Engineering, or designate.
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4180 Biomedical Engineering Design IV F,W (2-6) [1.00]
This is the capstone design course for the Biomedical Engineering program. Teams normally of 3-4 students apply engineering analysis and design principles to a biomedical engineering problem. A completely specified solution at the level of preliminary or final design is required, including assessment of socio-economic and environmental impact. This is a small group design that requires reports and a poster presentation to a professional standard. Ethics and legal case studies relevant to professional engineering practice are presented during the lectures. Only students currently registered in ENGG*4000 will be permitted to select this course.
Prerequisite(s): All 1000 and 2000 level core courses and ENGG*4000
Restriction(s): Registration in semester 8 (last semester) of the BENG program and in a maximum of 3.25 credits registration. Students must have a minimum cumulative average of 60% or higher in ALL ENGG courses. Restriction waiver requests are handled by the Director, School of Engineering, or designate.
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4200 Wireless Sensor Networks F (3-2) [0.50]
This course focuses on the fundamentals behind the design of wireless sensor networks. Topics include node architecture, operating systems, prototypes and applications for wireless sensor networks. The course emphasizes basic architectural framework including physical layer, medium access control layer and network layer. It also covers network management topics such as power management, time synchronization and localization. The course has a number of experiments with sensor network software and hardware. The primary focus of the experiments is to give students hands-on programming experience with various microcontrollers and sensing platforms.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*3640
Restriction(s): ENGG*4650
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4220 Interdisciplinary Mechanical Engineering Design W (3-3) [0.75]
This is a general design course for students registered in the B. Eng. major in mechanical engineering who wish to develop a broad based mechanical engineering foundation. Students work in groups to develop a general mechanical engineering design. Special attention is paid to the sustainability of the design, its economic feasibility and overall efficiency.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*3100
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4230 Energy Conversion F (3-3) [0.75]
The course introduces the technical criteria for the design of efficient energy conversion processes and systems. It covers review of boilers and cycles, fuel and combustion calculations, and fundamentals of both traditional and emerging energy conversion processes and systems for production of thermal, mechanical, and electrical energy. Topics include fossil, biomass, nuclear fuels, wind, solar, geothermal and fuel cells. Mechanisms for storing energy generated from each of these systems are also studied. The course also discusses conversion of automobile, renovation of old fossil fuel fired plant, co-firing of opportunity fuel, waste to energy technology, emission, and economics of energy projects.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*3080, ENGG*3260
Restriction(s): ENGG*2050
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4240 Site Remediation F (3-1) [0.50]
Remediation of contaminated sites is done to mitigate impacts to the environment and public health. The course will: review the applicable legislation; identify the important soil, water, air and chemical interactions; review the steps of an environmental risk assessment so that contaminated sites can be identified and evaluated to see if remediation is required; and evaluate and appraise various remediation technologies to complete the soil and groundwater remediation.
Co-requisite(s): ENGG*3590, ENGG*3670
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4250 Watershed Systems Design W (3-2) [0.75]
This course is a hydrological analysis of watershed systems including stream flow for design of structures and channels, flood warning, flood plain mapping and low-flow characteristics. Hydraulic analysis is applied to the design of dams, reservoirs, control structures, energy dissipation structures, bridges and culverts. An analysis of steady flow profiles, flood waves, and sediment transport is applied in the design of natural and constructed channels and protective works for rivers to achieve environmentally sustainable land use in watershed systems.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2230, ENGG*3650
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4280 Digital Process Control Design W (3-2) [0.75]
Design, analysis synthesis and simulation of process control and automation systems. Automation hardware, process compensation techniques and P.I.D. controllers, design and dynamics of final control elements, computer control and the microprocessor.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*3410
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4300 Food Processing Engineering Design W (3-2) [0.75]
This course covers the design of various food processing operations and the physico-chemical and mechano-biological response of foods to such operations. Topics include: process evaluation; optimization of operations such as thermal and chemical processes; and rheological properties of various food forms.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*3430 or FOOD*3170
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4340 Solid and Hazardous Waste Management F (3-2) [0.50]
Solid waste generation rates and waste composition. Integrated waste management: collection, recovery, reuse, recycling, energy-from-waste, and landfilling. Biological treatment of the organic waste fraction - direct land application, composting, anaerobic digestion. Environmental impact of waste management and sustainable development. Cross media issues related to solid waste disposal. An introduction to hazardous waste management and treatment methods.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2560 or ENGG*2660
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4360 Soil-Water Conservation Systems Design F (3-2) [0.75]
Properties of soils and land use governing the occurrence and magnitude of overland flow, soil erosion, infiltration, percolation of soil water, and variations in soil water storage. Design of soil and water management systems and structures to control soil erosion and protect water quality for environmentally and economically sustainable land use planning. Design of surface and subsurface drainage systems for rural land. Design of sprinkler and trickle irrigation systems.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2230, ENGG*3650, ENGG*3670
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4370 Urban Water Systems Design F (3-2) [0.75]
Estimation of water quantity and quality needed for urban water supply and drainage. Design of water supply, pumping systems, pipe networks and distributed storage reservoirs from analysis of steady and transient, pressurized and free surface flow. Rates of generation of flows and pollutants to sanitary and storm sewers, design of buried pipe and open channel drainage systems with structures for flow and pollution control. Modeling of water systems for sustainable urban development.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2230, ENGG*3650
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4380 Bioreactor Design F (3-2) [0.75]
Topics in this course include: modeling and design of batch and continuous bioreactors based on biological growth kinetics and mass balances; gas-liquid mass transfer for aeration and agitation; instrumentation; and control.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*3160
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4390 Bio-instrumentation Design F (3-2) [0.75]
Theory and selection criteria of devices used in measurements in biological systems; design of complete measurement systems including transducers, signal conditioning and recording components; error analysis. Differences between measurements in biological and physical systems.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*3450
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4400 Biomechanical Engineering Design W (3-2) [0.75]
This course covers concept development, design, modeling, manufacture and testing of biomechanical devices including athletic equipment, assistive devices, medical implants and tools. Other topics include the biomechanical factors influencing design, regulatory issues, current development trends, and the possible future direction of design and technology.
Prerequisite(s): 6.00 ENGG credits including ENGG*3150, ENGG*3170
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4420 Real-time Systems Design F (3-3) [0.75]
This course teaches real-time concepts from a system and computing perspective covering topics related to four major areas. Real-time computer control and system modeling area teaches basic real-time design and system modeling concepts for hard and soft real-time computer control applications. Real-time Operating Systems (RTOS) area introduces common kernel objects and inter-task communication and synchronization using examples from current commercial RTOS. Topics in the area of scheduling present theoretical results related to uniprocessor and multiprocessor scheduling algorithms and topics in the area of fault tolerance and reliability present current techniques at software and hardware level.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2400, ENGG*3640
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4430 Neuro-Fuzzy and Soft Computing Systems W (3-0) [0.50]
This course covers the basics of fuzzy systems, neural networks and neuro-fuzzy systems. The main focus is the concepts and algorithms of fuzzy sets, rules, and reasoning, as well as neural network structures, supervised learning and unsupervised learning of neural networks, and hybrid neuro-fuzzy systems. The applications of neural networks and fuzzy systems to control systems, signal processing, systems modeling and systems identification will be presented through examples.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*3410
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4440 Computational Fluid Dynamics W (3-2) [0.50]
Computational methods for fluid mechanics form the core of the course. The concepts of modelling are covered including numerical analysis, the governing equations for fluid problems and finite discretization methods. Mathematical models for turbulence are presented and the student is exposed to the use of commercial software for the solution of complex problems in fluid dynamics.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2230, ENGG*3370
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4450 Large-Scale Software Architecture Engineering F (3-2) [0.50]
This course introduces the students to the analysis, synthesis and design of large-scale software systems at the architectural level. This is in contrast to the algorithmic and data structure viewpoint of most software systems. Large-scale software systems are complex, execute on many processors, under different operating systems, use a particular or many language(s) of implementation, and typically rely on system layers, network connectivity, messaging and data management and hardware interfacing. The material covered includes architectural styles, case studies, architectural design techniques, formal models, specifications and architectural design tools. The laboratory sessions will expose the students to analyzing and redesigning an existing large-scale software system.
Prerequisite(s): (CIS*2420 or CIS*2520), ENGG*2100
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4460 Robotic Systems F (3-3) [0.50]
This course covers robot technology fundamentals, mathematical representation of kinematics, planning and execution of robot trajectories, introduction to robot languages, programming of robotic systems, different application domains for robots (e.g. assembly, manufacturing, medical, services, etc.), and robot sensors. The goal of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive background, approaches and skills to apply robotics technology to real world engineering applications and problems.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*1500, ENGG*2400
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4470 Finite Element Analysis F (3-2) [0.50]
The theory of finite element analysis is presented including element derivation and solution procedures. Students use a finite element package to solve problems based on static and dynamic applications in mechanical systems. Examples are chosen from classical machines as well as biological systems.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2160, MATH*2130, MATH*2270
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4480 Advanced Mechatronic Systems Design W (3-3) [0.75]
The course is a follow up to the introductory mechatronics course and aims at covering advanced topics that are necessary in developing mechatronic systems. Topics include: signal conditioning and filtering for mechatronics system including advanced filters such as Kalman filters; important/advanced electronic circuits for mechatronics systems; microcontroller interfacing and programming; design and development of motion control for mechatronics systems including PLC; introduction of integrated complex mechatronics systems: concept, structure, and applications. Through a design project, students will use and apply these concepts in building a complex mechatronics system with advanced features.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*3490
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4510 Assessment & Management of Risk W (3-1) [0.50]
This course will develop the bases by which risk to human health and the environment can be assessed. Issues of hazardous waste cleanups, permitting of water and air discharges, food safety, flood protection, as examples, are addressed. The course also examines how decisions are made to manage the risks to acceptable levels.
Prerequisite(s): STAT*2040 or STAT*2120
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4540 Advanced Computer Architecture W (3-2) [0.50]
This course covers topics such as: basics of pipeline structure, advanced pipelining and instruction level parallelism, multiprocessor and thread-level parallelism, memory-hierarchy design (main memory, virtual memory, caches), storage systems, interconnection networks, multiprocessor architectures (centralized and distributed). Advanced topics related to new emerging computer architectures will also be presented. The emphasis in each topic is on fundamental limitations and the trade-offs involved in designing computer systems, including memory and processing bandwidth, network bandwidth and latency, synchronization, and storage system bandwidth and latency.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*3380
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4550 VLSI Digital Design W (3-2) [0.50]
This course introduces the students to the analysis, synthesis and design of Very Large Scale integration (VLSI) digital circuits and implementing them in silicon. The topics of this course are presented at three levels of design abstraction. At device level: MOS diode; MOS (FET) transistor; interconnect wire. At circuit level: CMOS inverter; static CMOS gates (NAND, NOR); dynamic gates (NAND, NOR); static latches and registers; dynamic latches and registers; pipelining principles and circuit styles; BICMOS logic circuits. At system level; implementation strategies for digital ICs; interconnect at system level; timing issues in digital circuits (clock structures); the adder; the multiplier; the shifter; memory design and array structure; low power design circuits and architectures.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2410, ENGG*2450, ENGG*3450
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4560 Embedded System Design W (3-3) [0.75]
This course introduces the basic principles of embedded system design. It utilizes advanced hardware/software abstractions to help design complex systems. Topics include: design of embedded CUPs; embedded architecture cores; system-on-chip designs and integration using processor cores and dedicated core modules; embedded computing platforms; embedded programming design and analysis; processes and operating systems; networks for embedded systems; distributed embedded architectures; design examples that target robotics, automobile, and communication systems.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*3380 or ENGG*3640
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4580 Sustainable Energy Systems Design W (3-3) [0.75]
The analysis and design of sustainable energy systems are presented in this course. Techniques considered include generation of alternative designs to satisfy a problem definition; evaluation of alternative designs; application of modeling simulations and cost analyses.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*3080, ENGG*3370, ENGG*3430
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4660 Medical Image Processing W (3-2) [0.50]
This course covers the fundamentals of medical imaging from both the processing of digital images and the physics of image formation. Image processing topics covered include: fundamentals of resolution and quantization; linear systems as applied to multi-dimensional continuous and discrete systems including the relationship between the point spread functions and modulation transfer function; point operations such as contrast enhancement, histogram equalization, and H and D curves, geometric operations for distortion correction, including interpolation methods; linear filtering in both the spatial and spatial-frequency domains; and image restoration and inverse filtering. The physics of the following imaging modalities with emphasis on the parameters which effect image quality will be covered: x-ray radiology, MRI, ultrasound, and nuclear medicine.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*3390
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4680 Multidisciplinary Engineering Design W (2-4) [0.75]
This is a general design course for students registered in the B. Eng. major in Biomedical Engineering and who do not wish to develop a strong specialization in one of the specific areas of the program. Students work in groups to develop a general Biomedical engineering design. Special attention is paid to the sustainability of the design, its economic feasibility and overall efficiency.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*3100
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4720 Physical Design Automation W (3-2) [0.50]
This course presents the applications of a number of important optimization techniques (such as linear programming, integer programming, simulated annealing, and genetic algorithms) to various design-automation problems, including: logic partitioning, floorplanning, placement, global routing, detailed routing, compaction, and performance-driven layout.
Prerequisite(s): CIS*2500, CIS*3490, ENGG*3700
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4760 Biological Wastewater Treatment Design W (3-2) [0.50]
The course applies design principles for a variety of biological treatment systems for both municipal and industrial wastewater. This involves the design of suspended growth and attached growth processes, anaerobic digestion, sludge processing and utilization, water reuse and resource recovery facilities.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*3590
Restriction(s): ENGG*4260
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4770 Physical & Chemical Water and Wastewater Treatment Design F (3-2) [0.50]
This course focuses on the theory, application, and design principles of physical and chemical operations and processes for the treatment of water and wastewater. This involves the design of physical and chemical unit operations, and evaluating the optimum combination to satisfy the given design constraints and criteria. The optimum designs integrate engineering science, basic science, economics, and health and safety for workers and the public.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*3590
Restriction(s): ENGG*4260
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4810 Control of Atmospheric Particulates F (3-2) [0.50]
The focus of this course is understanding, analyzing and designing conventional and innovative atmospheric particulate control systems. The properties and transport of atmospheric particulates, and the principles of cyclones, filtration and electrostatic precipitation will be taught through theory, simulations, experiments and a design project.
Prerequisite(s): 6.00 credits of ENGG courses, ENGG*2230, ENGG*2450, MATH*2130
Restriction(s): ENGG*4330
Department(s): School of Engineering
ENGG*4820 Atmospheric Emission Control: Combustion Systems W (3-2) [0.50]
Combustion systems are an essential part of our society, however, they are also the dominant source of atmospheric pollutants. This course will focus on investigation of combustion systems for the purpose of reducing atmospheric emissions.
Prerequisite(s): ENGG*2560, ENGG*3260
Co-requisite(s): ENGG*3430
Restriction(s): ENGG*4330
Department(s): School of Engineering
University of Guelph
50 Stone Road East
Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1
Canada
519-824-4120