XII. Course Descriptions

English

School of English and Theatre Studies

  1. ENGL*1080 and ENGL*2080 provide a strong foundation for English studies at the University level and are required courses for students intending to major or minor in English. These linked courses expose students not only to a broad range of texts from different countries and historical periods but also to some of the exciting developments in the discipline.

  2. Honours major students are required to take the seminar courses ENGL*2120, ENGL*2130, ENGL*3940, ENGL*3960, preferably in their 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th semesters. ENGL*1080 is a pre-requisite to ENGL*2120 and ENGL*2130; ENGL*2080 is a pre-requisite to ENGL*3940 and ENGL*3960.

  3. Honours major students are required to take one 4000-level seminars, preferably in their 7th and 8th semesters. The prerequisites for the 4000-level seminars are ENGL*2080 plus one of ENGL*2120, ENGL*2130 plus one of ENGL*3940, ENGL*3960.

  4. Honours minor students are required to take the seminar course ENGL*2120 and one of ENGL*2130, ENGL*3940, ENGL*3960, preferably in their 3rd to 6th semester.

  5. Many English lecture courses are offered on alternate years only and many English seminars have variable content. For more information, students should consult the School's home page at http://www.arts.uoguelph.ca/sets/.

  6. Many English lecture courses are reading-intensive while seminar courses are writing and presentation-intensive. Honours major students are advised to take two lectures and one seminar per semester beginning in their 3rd semester.

  7. WRITING- AND PRESENTATION-INTENSIVE: Seminars emphasize written and oral work to help students develop the critical reading and writing skills essential to their learning throughout the curriculum.

  8. READING-INTENSIVE: Lectures emphasize breadth of reading, contexts, and comparisons, to help students develop the knowledge base essential to their understanding of the field. In order to allow essay-writing to be concentrated in seminars, assignments in lecture courses will not predominantly take the traditional essay form but a range of other formats.

ENGL*1030 Effective Writing S,F,W (3-0) [0.50]
This course is designed primarily for those not pursuing a specialization in English and focuses on the development of the skills for effective writing. Topics will include sentence and paragraph structure, essay organization, and the implementation of convincing written arguments. Students will apply these skills to the completion of several written assignments, culminating in a short work of non-fiction prose.
Offering(s): Also offered through Distance Education format.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*1080 Literatures in English I: Reading the Past F,W (3-0) [0.50]
This course is focused on the disciplinary skill of close reading and is intended for students planning to specialize in the study of English Literature. Through a series of case studies, the course introduces students to a range of historical and national writings in prose, poetry, and drama, and to some of the key terms and concepts in contemporary literary studies. Lectures and discussions address selected works from the Middle Ages onwards, the periods in which these works were produced, and some of the ways in which these texts have been or could be interpreted. ENGL*1080 and its companion course, ENGL*2080, are required for a major or minor in English. Students are encouraged to enrol in ENGL*2080 in the semester after they have completed ENGL*1080. Reading - and writing-intensive course.
Restriction(s): This is a priority access course. Enrolment in the fall semester may be restricted to students registered in the English major, minor, area of concentration, Creative Writing minor, or in semesters one or two of the BA or BAS program.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*1200 Reading the Contemporary World F,W (3-0) [0.50]
This course, which is designed primarily for those not planning a specialization in English, introduces students to literary texts and persuasive forms of writing, bringing to the fore some of the links between language and contemporary social and political issues. Course materials will represent diversity in terms of national origins, gender, race, and class. The course emphasizes the use of figurative language as well as the development of students' critical reading and writing skills. Students planning to major or minor or pursue an area of concentration in English must take ENGL*1080 and ENGL*2080, but may also take ENGL*1200 and count it as an elective lecture.
Offering(s): Also offered through Distance Education format.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*1410 Major Writers U (3-0) [0.50]
This course, which is designed primarily for those not planning a specialization in English, offers an introduction to the study of literature through a chronological consideration of works by selected major authors from the Middle Ages to the present century, in relation to their social, intellectual and literary backgrounds. The course emphasizes the use of figurative language as well as the development of students' critical reading and writing skills. Students planning to major or minor or pursue an area of concentration in English must take ENGL*1080 and ENGL*2080, but may also take ENGL*1410.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*1500 Medicine and Literature W (3-0) [0.50]
This course explores the representational and cultural practices concerning health care and the body. Students will examine how literary texts represent, interpret, and critique the cultures of biomedical science, the clinic, and the hospital. Areas of interest include disease, illness, health, disability, and psychological and physiological trauma.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*2040 Latina/o Literature and Cultural Production: Intro F (3-0) [0.50]
This survey course introduces students to the terms, methodologies, and debates that form the interdisciplinary critical practice of Latina/o Studies. The course takes a pan-Latina/o approach to the study of English-language and cultural production by various Latina/os primarily in the U.S. Because different Latina/o groups have been concentrated in particular U.S. regions and cities, the approach allows students to study how Latina/o literature and art have shaped the politics and culture of different regions and cities. Reading-intensive course.
Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*2080 Literatures in English II: Finding a Critical Voice F,W (3-0) [0.50]
This course revisits the historical, national, and genre sweep of ENGL*1080 by conducting a range of specific, more in-depth studies of particular works (including some of the texts examined in ENGL*1080) in their historical moments. Seminars help students to develop a range of critical approaches through oral presentations and essay-writing. Students are encouraged to enrol in ENGL*2080 in the semester after they have completed ENGL*1080.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1080
Equate(s): ENGL*2060
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*2090 Studies in Shakespeare W (3-0) [0.50]
This course focuses on Shakespeare as both a writer and an enduring cultural presence. It may, at the instructor’s choice, focus on works by Shakespeare as well as works by others in response to Shakespeare, in Shakespeare’s original historical context or in more contemporary contexts. The course may address, among others, genre, performance, adaptation, the politics of Shakespearean interpretation, including issues such as gender, subjectivity, empire, and nation. Reading-intensive course.
Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits
Restriction(s): ENGL*3020, ENGL*3120
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*2120 Seminar: Critical Practices F,W (3-0) [0.50]
This course guides students through a range of critical approaches and explores their implications for readings of a limited number of literary texts. The seminar's main areas of concentration are: (1) close reading, centering on the way a particular poem, work of fiction, or play works in its details and overall structure; (2) critical approaches and methodologies; (3) critical writing and discussion. (Choices of approaches and texts will be determined by individual instructors.) Writing- and presentation-intensive course.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1080
Restriction(s): Registration in the English major, minor or area of concentration, or minor in Creative Writing.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*2130 Seminar: Literature and Social Change F,W (3-0) [0.50]
This course explores the social and cultural work that literary texts perform. Seminars will illuminate such categories as gender, sexuality, nation, race, ethnicity, and class; particular ways in which they are written into a limited number of literary works; and some of the critical debates surrounding our interpretations of those processes. (Choices of approaches and texts will be determined by individual instructors.) Writing- and presentation-intensive course.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1080
Restriction(s): Registration in the English major, minor or area of concentration, or minor in Creative Writing.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*2190 Queer Literatures and Cultures W (3-0) [0.50]
This course examines the ways in which gender, sexuality, and identity politics are addressed, critiqued, and shaped by queer literature, performance and media. This course will consider the meanings of “queer” itself and explore how queerness intersects with race, class, gender, sex, and other forms of social difference.
Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*2200 Postcolonial Literatures, Film, and Other Media F (3-0) [0.50]
This course introduces students to contemporary literatures, film, and other media that engage with the impact of European colonization on eighty-five percent of the globe. The course may include material from Africa, Australia, the Americas, the Caribbean, the Indian Subcontinent, and the Pacific. Reading-intensive course
Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*2260 Law and Literature F (3-0) [0.50]
This course introduces students to the intersections between law and literature. The course encourages students to read literary texts by focusing on issues of justice, crime, judgment, and equity. Students will examine how literature can serve as an alternative cultural arena or site that gives voice to experiences and knowledges that cannot be translated into the laws language of equivalence and neutrality. By reading literary texts in relation to the law, students will examine how literature and literary theory can enhance our understanding of the law.
Offering(s): Offered in even-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*2270 Fairy, Trickster, and Mythical Hero F (3-0) [0.50]
This course focuses on the everyday emergence of the fantastic, the otherworldly, and the extraordinary in commonly told cultural narratives such as the fairy tale, trickster tale and myth. The course may focus on tales of specific regions (e.g. Europe, North America, the South Pacific), and may cross a range of genres (oral tale, pantomime, short story, film, graphic novel) as well as historical periods. The course may also address continuities and discontinuities in versions of traditional narratives created by tellers, writers, and other artists.
Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*2280 Sporting Bodies W (3-0) [0.50]
This course examines various aspects of sports and play as they are manifested in a range of literary texts and other cultural forms. Because the emergence of sport as a social practice has been so intertwined with notions of regulation, performance, and fandom, sporting culture offers a valuable site for looking at questions of identity and social relations more broadly.
Offering(s): Offered in even-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*2290 Outlaws W (3-0) [0.50]
Literary narratives about crime and the criminal have both glamorized the outlaw and idealized the restoration of law and order. Students will examine how literary narratives frame the figure of the outlaw in order to: contemplate the relationship between the individual and law, as well as between outlaw communities and the law; shape popular understandings of the law and the consequences of breaking the law; interrogate the law’s absolute claim to justice; examine the cost of policing to maintain law and order; and/or critique state power by giving voice to the marginalized.
Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*2310 Vampires, Ghosts, and Mummies: Literature and the Supernatural F (3-0) [0.50]
While we often dismiss the occult or the supernatural in literature as simple entertainment, this course encourages students to examine how literary works engage the occult and the supernatural in order to address issues of power, race, gender, imperialism and modernity from the nineteenth century to the present.
Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*2330 Print Culture and Cinema F (3-0) [0.50]
This course moves between writing and cinema, in different periods and with different emphases according to the instructor’s expertise. Topics may include: adaptation from page to screen and adaptation theory; the relationship between print forms and early motion picture and between fiction and film; the construction of celebrity and spectatorship in print and movie cultures; questions of “fidelity,” technology, silence and sound, literary prestige and film publicity. Reading-intensive course.
Offering(s): Offered in even-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*2360 Medieval Literature W (3-0) [0.50]
This course introduces students to the literature of the English Middle Ages. Students will read both Old English texts (such as Beowulf and The Wanderer) and Middle English texts (such as Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and selections from The Canterbury Tales) alongside non-literary medieval texts—histories, guides to religious living, and philosophical tracts—that together work to reveal the cultural context in which medieval writers worked. The class will also include representative medieval drama (mystery plays and/or morality plays) and works by and about women (such as the works of Marie de France and Margery Kempe).
Offering(s): Offered in even-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits
Restriction(s): ENGL*3560
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*2550 North American Native Literatures W (3-0) [0.50]
This course explores selected issues, perspectives, and voices within the study of Native literatures and their contexts in North America. One purpose of the course is to raise questions about the meaning of the U.S. - Canadian border for Native writers. Reading-intensive course.
Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*2640 Culture, Location, Identity: Minoritized Literatures in Canada and Beyond F (3-0) [0.50]
This course will open up debates around emergent issues, perspectives, and voices in the literatures of minoritized cultures particularly within the North American context. Questions about the meanings of various borders for understanding Canadian negotiations of identity, culture, and location will remain a consistent feature of this variable content course. Reading-intensive course.
Offering(s): Also offered through Distance Education format.
Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*2740 Children's Literature F,W (3-0) [0.50]
This course serves as an introduction to the critical study of children's literature and culture. Focusing on selected genres of, issues in, or theoretical approaches to literature for children, this variable-content course explores shifting (and often conflicting) conceptions of childhood, in general, and of children as readers and cultural consumers. Reading-intensive course.
Offering(s): Also offered through Distance Education format.
Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*2880 Women in Literature W (3-0) [0.50]
This variable-content course will involve the study and discussion of poems, stories, novels and plays by or about women. Reading-intensive course.
Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*2920 Elements of Creative Writing F,W (3-0) [0.50]
This lecture course focuses on teaching character, dialogue, setting and plot. Students will learn how to create a compelling narrative, as well as recognize the key successful elements in the narratives that surround us, for example advertisements, blogs, or film, television, etc. Student skills are developed through a combination of lectures, in-class workshops, peer editing, and short written assignments.
Prerequisite(s): 4.00 credits
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3050 Intermediate Fiction Writing Workshop F,W (3-0) [0.50]
Students will gain a deeper understanding of the basic elements of creative writing (character development, effective dialogue, narrative arc, and setting) through practical experiments, discussions, and group writing exercises. Through the writing workshops, students will hone their skills as creative writers, critical thinkers, and editors.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1080, ENGL*2920
Restriction(s): Registration in the Creative Writing minor.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3060 Intermediate Poetry Writing Workshop F (3-0) [0.50]
Students will gain a deeper understanding of the basic elements of poetry writing (form, line, metre, imagery, rhyme, rhythm, syntax, and metaphor). Alongside this attention to form, students will explore the histories of these global poetries and their relationship to historical developments. Through reading assigned texts and the writing workshops students will hone their skills as creative writers, critical thinkers, and editors.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1080, ENGL*2920
Restriction(s): ENGL*2940, Registration in the Creative Writing minor.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3070 Intermediate Screenwriting Workshop W (3-0) [0.50]
With emphasis on craft, this workshop addresses some fundamentals of feature screenwriting through various writing, reading and viewing assignments and exercises, as well as the workshopping of students’ written work. Topics will include: story structure, theme, character development, story lines, scene construction, synopsis writing and pitching, and options for further training and development.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1080, ENGL*2920
Restriction(s): Registration in the Creative Writing minor.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3080 History and Linguistics of the English Language W (3-0) [0.50]
This course introduces the key historical developments of the English language and the primary tools for the study of language. Students will learn the rudiments of morphology, phonology, and syntax of the English language from the earliest periods to the present day. Topics to be discussed may include: the origins of and precursors to the English language; lexicon and grammar of English; the persistence of language change; the historical factors that affect language change; the origins and implications of language variety; the formation of prestige dialects; and the current state of the English language in Canada and the world. Reading-intensive course.
Offering(s): Offered in even-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 7.50 credits
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3090 Special Topics in Creative Writing Workshop F,W (3-0) [0.50]
This course will provide students with opportunities to write in genres other than fiction, poetry, playwriting and screenwriting. Each iteration will focus on a particular genre, which might include graphic novels, writing narrative of games, memoir or travel writing. Please consult the School of English and Theatre Studies’s website for more information on a specific iteration of the course.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1080, ENGL*2920
Restriction(s): Registration in the Creative Writing minor.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3220 Representing Britain: 18th- & 19th- Century Literature F (3-0) [0.50]
This course explores selected topics in the interrelation of literature and politics from the late seventeenth to the nineteenth century in Britain. Areas of focus may include: the literature of civil war, constitutionalism and revolution; satire and society; writings emerging from sufferage reform and agitation, the colonization of Ireland, the construction of political subjectivity, political paranoia, conspiracy and sedition. Reading-intensive course.
Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 7.50 credits including 0.50 credits in English (excluding ENGL*1030)
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3240 Studies in Early Modern Literature and Culture W (3-0) [0.50]
This course examines various aspects of the literature and culture of early modern England. The course may examine, at the instructor’s choice, some part of the fifteenth, sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and may focus on a variety of issues, including gender and sexuality, poetics and politics, religion and authority, nation and empire, and their relation to literary production. The genres and writers examined will vary.
Prerequisite(s): 7.50 credits including 0.50 credits in English (excluding ENGL*1030)
Restriction(s): ENGL*3170, ENGL*3190.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3300 Restoration to Romanticism: Forging the Nation F (3-0) [0.50]
Drawing upon a range of literary texts from a variety of genres, this course will explore the politics of language and style in a series of cultural debates that shaped British national character from the late seventeenth to the late eighteenth centuries. Selected topics may include: literary representations of religious establishment and dissent; the division of power; the question of minority cultures; revolution and reaction; the problem of economic stability. Reading-intensive course.
Offering(s): Offered in even-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 7.50 credits including 0.50 credits in English (excluding ENGL*1030)
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3320 Romanticism to Victorianism: Culture and Conformity F (3-0) [0.50]
This course explores the key texts in various genres of British cultural debates of the late eighteenth to the late nineteenth century. Focal points may include: literary representations of family and society; science and narrative; Britain's "others"; class and conflict; protest and power; the roots of modernism; European influences. Reading-intensive course.
Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 7.50 credits including 0.50 credits in English (excluding ENGL*1030)
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3340 British Imperial Culture F (3-0) [0.50]
This multi-genre course introduces students to the literature of British imperialism in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The course will consider the changing relationship between nation, empire, and colony by examining literary representations of such topics as: orientalism; travel writing; the construction of race; the representation of trade; the popular literature of empire; children's literature; the question of the other. Reading-intensive course.
Offering(s): Offered in even-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 7.50 credits including 0.50 credits in English (excluding ENGL*1030)
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3380 Studies in the History of Literary Production W (3-0) [0.50]
This course will examine a range of issues arising from the materiality of book production and circulation. Topics may include serialization; mass production and circulation; patronage; reviewing; circulating libraries; licensing; censorship; children's literature; periodicals; gift books; letters; and other aspects of publishing and the public sphere. Reading-intensive course.
Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 7.50 credits including 0.50 credits in English (excluding ENGL*1030)
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3420 20th- & 21st-Century Drama W (3-0) [0.50]
This course offers a selective study of 20th- and/or 21st-century play-scripts written in English. Students are advised to consult the web-descriptions for the particular focus of the course's offering.
Offering(s): Offered in even-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 7.50 credits including [0.50 credits in English (excluding ENGL*1030) or 0.50 credits in Theatre Studies]
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3460 Literature in London U (2-3) [0.50]
A study of British literature in its social and historical context. Reading of particular works will be supplemented by visits to sites of literary interest, the use of special library and museum collections, and attendance at public lectures and performances. For London Semester students only.
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the London Semester.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3470 Twentieth-Century British Literature I W (3-0) [0.50]
This multigenre course explores aesthetic and socio-cultural movements (including modernism) in British literature from the turn of the century to mid-century. Reading-intensive course.
Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 7.50 credits including 0.50 credits in English (excluding ENGL*1030)
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3480 Twentieth-Century British Literature II F (3-0) [0.50]
This multigenre course explores aesthetic and socio-cultural movements (including postmodernism) in British literature from mid-century to the present. Reading-intensive course.
Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 7.50 credits including 0.50 credits in English (excluding ENGL*1030)
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3540 Writing the United States W (3-0) [0.50]
This multigenre course explores the relationship between literary production and political power from the emergence of U.S. culture through the long nineteenth century. Areas of focus may include national fantasy; the literatures of war, imperial expansion, captivity, and genocide; narratives of race and immigration; the cult of domesticity; and the rise of mass culture. Reading-intensive course.
Offering(s): Offered in even-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 7.50 credits including 0.50 credits in English (excluding ENGL*1030)
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3550 Modern United States Literatures W (3-0) [0.50]
This multigenre course explores powerful examples of modern United States literatures, from about the First World War to the present. The selection is wide, including both traditional and experimental forms; female and male writers from various ethnic and racial groups; and a range of cultural issues. Reading-intensive course.
Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 7.50 credits including 0.50 credits in English (excluding ENGL*1030)
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3570 Chaucer in Context F (3-0) [0.50]
This course will introduce students to significant aspects of Chaucer's writing read in the context of works by Chaucer's precursors and near contemporaries. Reading-intensive course.
Offering(s): Offered in even-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 7.50 credits including 0.50 credits in English (excluding ENGL*1030)
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3630 Writing Canada: Forging the Nation W (3-0) [0.50]
This multigenre course focuses on Canadian literature to World War One, examining cultural contestation in the Canadian settler colony among the Canadian, U.S., British, and indigenous peoples. Topics may include the rise of nationalist discourse, race and nation, landscape and the sublime, gothic, sentimental, and historical fiction, children's literature, slavery and resistance narratives, travel and captivity narratives. Reading-intensive course.
Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 7.50 credits including 0.50 credits in English (excluding ENGL*1030)
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3680 20th- & 21st-Century Canadian Literature and Criticism F (3-0) [0.50]
This course examines Canadian literature and criticism in English from the beginnings of the twentieth century to the present in relation to a variety of social, cultural, and historical contexts. Reading-intensive course.
Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 7.50 credits including 0.50 credits in English (excluding ENGL*1030)
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3690 History of Literary Criticism F (3-0) [0.50]
This course introduces students to the major critics and texts formative in the development of an English critical tradition. The study will begin with Plato and Aristotle, and proceed from the Renaissance through to modernist critical theory.
Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 7.50 credits including 0.50 credits in English (excluding ENGL*1030)
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3750 Studies in Postcolonial Literatures W (3-0) [0.50]
This course is a concentrated study in a major sub-area of postcolonial literature. Specific topics will vary each year, but may involve focus on a particular genre or region such as Africa, Australia, Canada, the Caribbean, India, and the Pacific. Reading-intensive course.
Offering(s): Offered in even-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 7.50 credits including 0.50 credits in English (excluding ENGL*1030)
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3760 The Atlantic World W (3-0) [0.50]
This is a variable content course aimed at considering the intercultural effects which emerge from transnational, colonial, imperial, and/or diasporic relations, through literatures in English addressing the Atlantic and contiguous lands. Texts will be selected from among the rich array of poetry, fiction, memoirs, letters, travel accounts, period histories and ethnographies, autobiographies and folkloric records that formed the literary culture of this period. Attention may be paid to diverse forms of oral and written expression, linguistic changes, the Creole continuum, representations of oceanic space, the erasure and fluidity at work in the metaphorics of the sea, the evolution of national and racial stereotypes, and religious syncretism. Reading-intensive course.
Offering(s): Offered in even-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): 7.50 credits including 0.50 credits in English (excluding ENGL*1030)
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3870 Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies U (3-0) [0.50]
These variable-content courses provide opportunities for topics in cross-period studies, inter- and transdisciplinary studies and cultural studies, among others that are not available in regular offerings. Consult the School for specific offerings in a given semester. Reading-intensive course.
Offering(s): Also offered through Distance Education format.
Prerequisite(s): 7.50 credits including 0.50 credits in English.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3880 Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies U (3-0) [0.50]
These variable-content courses provide opportunities for topics in cross-period studies, inter- and transdisciplinary studies and cultural studies, among others that are not available in regular offerings. Consult the School for specific offerings in a given semester. Reading-intensive course.
Prerequisite(s): 1.00 credits in English.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3940 Seminar: Form, Genre, and Literary Value F,W (3-0) [0.50]
This seminar focuses on textual conventions such as form, style, and genre as they inform the interaction between reader and text. The impact of these conventions on the processes of literary production, reception, the production of meaning, and the assessment of literary value will be explored in relation to a limited number of literary works. (Choice of focus and texts to be determined by individual instructors.) Writing- and presentation-intensive course.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2080
Restriction(s): Registration in the English major, minor or area of concentration.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*3960 Seminar: Literature in History F,W (3-0) [0.50]
This course explores the processes by which specific texts or genres emerge from particular historical moments and by which we attempt to reconstruct those historically specific connections. Seminars will focus on such topics as the archive surrounding one text, problems of period and canon, or genres and historical change. (Choice of period and texts will be determined by individual instructors.)Writing- and presentation-intensive course.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2080
Restriction(s): Registration in the English major, minor or area of concentration.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*4140 Old English Language and Literature F (3-0) [1.00]
This course provides a rigorous introduction to Old English language and literature. Significantly different from modern English, Old English (or Anglo-Saxon), was spoken in England c. 700-1100 CE. Students will learn to read and translate Old English prose and poetry and will discuss Old English literary texts, some read in the original and some in translation, from a variety of thematic and critical perspectives. The course will culminate in an independent research project that leads to a final critical essay.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2080, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)
Restriction(s): ENGL*3280 Restricted to students in the English major, who have completed 14.00 credits with an average of 70% in all course attempts in English. Restricted to students with fewer than 2.00 credits of 4000-level English courses.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*4240 Medieval & Early Modern Literatures U (3-0) [1.00]
This seminar provides the opportunity for intensive study of British literature from the beginnings to 1660. Students are advised to complete a 3000-level lecture course in this subject area prior to enrolling in the 4000-level course.
Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2080, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)
Restriction(s): ENGL*4040 Restricted to students in the English major, who have completed 14.00 credits with an average of 70% in all course attempts in English. Restricted to students with fewer than 2.00 credits of 4000-level English courses.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*4250 18th- & 19th-C Literatures U (3-0) [1.00]
This seminar provides the opportunity for intensive study of British literature from 1660 to 1900. Students are advised to complete a 3000-level lecture course in this subject area prior to enrolling in the 4000-level course.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2080, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)
Restriction(s): ENGL*4050 Restricted to students in the English major, who have completed 14.00 credits with an average of 70% in all course attempts in English. Restricted to students with fewer than 2.00 credits of 4000-level English courses.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*4270 United States Literatures U (3-0) [1.00]
This seminar provides the opportunity for intensive study of United States literatures. Students are advised to complete a 3000-level lecture course in this subject area prior to enrolling in the 4000-level course.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2080, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)
Restriction(s): ENGL*4070 Restricted to students in the English major, who have completed 14.00 credits with an average of 70% in all course attempts in English. Restricted to students with fewer than 2.00 credits of 4000-level English courses.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*4280 Canadian Literatures U (3-0) [1.00]
This seminar provides the opportunity for intensive study of Canadian literatures. Students are advised to complete a 3000-level lecture course in this subject area prior to enrolling in the 4000-level course.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2080, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)
Restriction(s): ENGL*4080 Restricted to students in the English major, who have completed 14.00 credits with an average of 70% in all course attempts in English. Restricted to students with fewer than 2.00 credits of 4000-level English courses.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*4310 Special Studies in English U (3-0) [1.00]
A seminar designed to provide students in semesters 7 and 8 with an opportunity to pursue studies in an area or areas of language or literature not available in other courses. The course may be taught by a visiting professor or members of the school.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2080, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)
Restriction(s): ENGL*4100, ENGL*4110 Restricted to students in the English major, who have completed 14.00 credits with an average of 70% in all course attempts in English. Restricted to students with fewer than 2.00 credits of 4000-level English courses.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*4400 Postcolonial Literatures U (3-0) [1.00]
This course provides the opportunity for intensive study of a representative selection of literature in English by writers from Africa, India, the Caribbean, Australia, and the Pacific. Students are advised to complete a 3000-level lecture course in this subject area prior to enrolling in the 4000-level course.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2080, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)
Restriction(s): ENGL*4200 Restricted to students in the English major, who have completed 14.00 credits with an average of 70% in all course attempts in English. Restricted to students with fewer than 2.00 credits of 4000-level English courses.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*4410 Modern & Contemporary Literatures U (3-0) [1.00]
This course provides the opportunity for a study of significant works in fiction, poetry, and drama that demonstrate new approaches in form and content characteristic of 20th- and 21st-century writings in English. Students are advised to complete a 3000-level lecture course in this subject area prior to enrolling in the 4000-level course.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2080, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)
Restriction(s): ENGL*4210 Restricted to students in the English major, who have completed 14.00 credits with an average of 70% in all course attempts in English. Restricted to students with fewer than 2.00 credits of 4000-level English courses.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*4420 Women's Writings U (3-0) [1.00]
This course provides for intensive study of issues relating to the aesthetic strategies, such as those associated with structure, imagery, and language, devised by women writers to reflect women's experience and perceptions. Students are advised to complete a 3000-level lecture course in this subject area prior to enrolling in the 4000-level course.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2080, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)
Restriction(s): ENGL*4220 Restricted to students in the English majors, who have completed 14.00 credits with an average of 70% in all course attempts in English. Restricted to students with fewer than 2.00 credits of 4000-level English courses.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*4500 Non-fiction Prose U (3-0) [1.00]
This course offers an intensive study of non-fiction prose. Topics to be explored may include the roles and contexts of public and/or private writing, the role of literary criticism in reading texts sometimes marked as non-literary, the history of non-fictional prose forms, or the formal or ideological uses of the distinctions between fact and fiction.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2080, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)
Restriction(s): ENGL*4300 Restricted to students in the English major, who have completed 14.00 credits with an average of 70% in all course attempts in English. Restricted to students with fewer than 2.00 credits of 4000-level English courses.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*4720 Creative Writing: Prose/Poetry F,W (3-0) [1.00]
A development and extension of the creative writing/reading skills and techniques introduced in the creative writing workshops. This course will involve the generation and revision of challenging new work, sophisticated critique of the work of other students, and focused discussion of the cultural, social, and political issues in which the practice of creative writing is enmeshed.
Prerequisite(s): 1 of ENGL*2920, ENGL*2940, ENGL*3050, ENGL*3060, ENGL*3070, ENGL*3090
Restriction(s): This is a Priority Access Course. Enrolment may be restricted to particular programs or specializations or semester levels during certain periods. Please see departmental website for more information.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*4810 Directed Reading S,F,W (3-0) [0.50]
This course is intended particularly as preparation for ENGL*4910. The student will design a course of readings and assignments with the instructor, whose consent must first be obtained. This option is intended only for students who have performed particularly well within the honours program. Exceptional students may take ENGL*4810 in preparation for a ENGL*4910 creative writing project, on the approval of the instructor.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2080, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)
Restriction(s): Instructor consent required.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*4880 20th- & 21st-Century Poetry U (3-0) [1.00]
This seminar provides opportunities to study English-language modern and contemporary poetry. Students are advised to complete a 3000-level lecture course in this subject area prior to enrolling in the 4000-level course.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2080, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)
Restriction(s): ENGL*4680 Restricted to students in the English major, who have completed 14.00 credits with an average of 70% in all course attempts in English. Restricted to students with fewer than 2.00 credits of 4000-level English courses.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*4890 Contemporary Literary Theory U (3-0) [1.00]
This course will study the major branches of contemporary literary theory. Topics covered will include structuralism, reader-oriented theory, feminist theory, new historicist and materialist critique, postcolonialist critique, and deconstruction.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2080, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)
Restriction(s): ENGL*4690 Restricted to students in the English major, who have completed 14.00 credits with an average of 70% in all course attempts in English. Restricted to students with fewer than 2.00 credits of 4000-level English courses.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
ENGL*4910 Honours English Essay S,F,W (3-0) [0.50]
A major essay (approx. 25 pages) on some subject of special interest to the student is prepared and written under the direction of a faculty member. Consent of the instructor must be obtained and the subject must be approved by the School prior to the semester in which the course is to be taken. This option is intended only for students who have performed particularly well within the honours program. Exceptional students may use ENGL*4910 for creative writing, on the approval of the instructor.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2080, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)
Restriction(s): Instructor consent required.
Department(s): School of English and Theatre Studies
University of Guelph
50 Stone Road East
Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1
Canada
519-824-4120