University of Guelph 2002-2003 Undergraduate Calendar

XII--Course Description, English

School of Literatures and Performance Studies in English.

ENGL*1060 Literatures in English I: Reading the Past F(2-2) [0.75]

This course introduces a range of historical and national writings in prose, poetry, and drama. Lectures address, chronologically, works by selected authors from the middle ages to the mid-twentieth century, the periods in which these works were produced, and some of the ways in which they have been read. Workshops focus on the development of writing and analytical skills. Reading- and writing-intensive course.

Restriction(s): ENGL*1410

ENGL*1200 Reading the Contemporary World F,W(2-1) [0.50]

An introduction to the reading of literary texts and persuasive forms of writing, bringing to the foreground the links between language and contemporary social and political issues. Course material will represent a range of national origins and issues involving gender, race, and class, and will illustrate the importance of figurative language, form and genre, and narrative point of view in learning to read critically. The course will also emphasize writing skills (grammar, organization of ideas, forms of written expression) through workshops and several short written assignments. Students planning to major in English must take ENGL*1060 but may also take ENGL*1200.

ENGL*1410 Major English Writers U(3-0) [0.50]

This course offers an introduction to the study of literature through a chronological consideration of works by selected major authors from the Middle Ages to the 20th century, in relation to their social, intellectual and literary backgrounds. Instruction and practice in effective essay writing will be included. (Offered through distance education format only.)

Restriction(s): ENGL*1060, ENGL*2060

ENGL*2060 Literatures in English II: Finding a Critical Voice W(1-2) [0.75]

This course revisits the historical, national, and genre sweep of ENGL*1060 by conducting a range of specific, more in-depth studies of particular works (including some of the texts examined in ENGL*1060) in their historical moments. Seminars help students to develop a range of critical approaches through oral presentations and essay-writing.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060

Restriction(s): ENGL*1410

ENGL*2120 Seminar: Critical Practices F,W(3-0) [0.50]

This course guides students through a range of critical approaches and explores their implications for readings of a limited number of literary texts. The seminar's main areas of concentration are: (1) close reading, centering on the way a particular poem, work of fiction, or play works in its details and overall structure; (2) critical approaches and methodologies; (3) critical writing and discussion. (Choices of approaches and texts will be determined by individual instructors.) Students in semester 3 or above may take ENGL*2060 and ENGL*2120/ENGL*2130 concurrently with permission of the instructor. Writing- and presentation-intensive course.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2060

Restriction(s): ENGL*2111/2

ENGL*2130 Seminar: Literature and Social Change F,W(3-0) [0.50]

This course explores the social and cultural work that literary texts perform. Seminars will illuminate such categories as gender, sexuality, nation, race, ethnicity, and class; particular ways in which they are written into a limited number of literary works; and some of the critical debates surrounding our interpretations of those processes. (Choice of focus and texts to be determined by individual instructors.) Students in semester 3 or above may take ENGL*2060 and ENGL*2120/ENGL*2130 concurrently with permission of the instructor. Writing- and presentation-intensive course.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2060

Restriction(s): ENGL*2111/2

ENGL*2200 Postcolonial Literatures F(3-0) [0.50]

This course introduces significant issues, perspectives, and voices within the study of the postcolonial literatures in English. The course may include literature from Africa, Australia, Canada, the Caribbean, India and the Pacific. Reading-intensive course.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*2550 North American Native Literatures W(3-0) [0.50]

This course explores selected issues, perspectives, and voices within the study of Native literatures and their contexts in North America. One purpose of the course is to raise questions about the meaning of the U.S. - Canadian border for Native writers. Reading-intensive course.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*2640 Culture, Location, Identity: Minoritized Literatures in Canada and Beyond F(3-0) [0.50]

This course will open up debates around emergent issues, perspectives, and voices in the literatures of minoritized cultures particularly within the North American context. Questions about the meanings of various borders for understanding Canadian negotiations of identity, culture, and location will remain a consistent feature of this variable content course. Reading-intensive course.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*2740 Children's Literature F,W(3-0) [0.50]

An exploration of the varieties of literature written for children and of the literary and psychological values contained therein. Third semester standing is required for admission.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*2840 Literature and Aging W(3-0) [0.50]

This course examines the ways in which literary texts represent old age and aging. Students will be alerted to the depth and complexity of insight which imaginative writers bring to the concerns of gerontology. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

ENGL*2860 Science Fiction F(3-0) [0.50]

A survey of science fiction dealing with the origins of the form and examining the varying modes and topics. Some effort will be made to evaluate the directions in which science fiction is developing and to consider its merit as literature. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

ENGL*2880 Women in Literature W(3-0) [0.50]

The course will involve the study and discussion of poems, stories, novels and plays by or about women.

ENGL*2920 Creative Writing: Fiction U(3-0) [0.50]

An introduction to creative writing through practical experiment, discussion, and the technical examination of models. Since admission to the course depends on the approval of the instructor, students must submit examples of their work to the instructor prior to registration. This course will be offered annually in either Fall or Winter. Check with the School.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*2940 Creative Writing: Poetry U(3-0) [0.50]

As for ENGL*2920. (Note especially that students must submit examples of their work to the instructor prior to registration.) This course will be offered annually in either Fall or Winter. Check with the School.

ENGL*3020 Shakespearean Contexts F(3-0) [0.50]

A study of a selection of Shakespeare's plays and poems in conjunction with a wide range of other texts. These may include, at the instructor's choice, 'source' narratives, subsequent adaptations, and plays and poems by predecessors or contemporaries, as well as other writings that shed light upon discursive contexts, performance practices, authorial and playhouse revision, issues of gender and subjectivity, and the reception of these plays by early modern audiences and readers. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3120 Shakespearean Receptions F(3-0) [0.50]

The course will examine a selection of Shakespeare's plays and poems in the light of contemporary reassessments of his place in the canon. For purposes of comparison, plays by contemporaries of Shakespeare may also be studied along with adaptations of Shakespeare chosen from a number of different historical contexts. Close readings of these texts will be organized around such topics as Shakespearean adaptations, constructions of gender and subjectivity, Shakespeare and canon-formation, Shakespeare and critical theory, the politics of Shakespearean interpretation, Shakespeare in contemporary media culture, and changing performance practices. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3170 Elizabethan Literary Culture: Chastity and Power W(3-0) [0.50]

This course examines the literary culture associated with Elizabeth I. Issues, including gender and sexuality, power, and religion, will be explored through a wide range of sixteenth- and early-seventeenth century poems (these will be chosen from such writers as Skelton, Wyatt, Surrey, Mary Stuart, the Sidneys, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Raleigh, Aemilia Lanyer, Mary Wroth, Elizabeth I, Jonson, Donne, and Herbert). Reading-intensive course. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3180 Colonial Encounters: Nation and Discovery W(3-0) [0.50]

This course examines writings concerning, or alluding to, English (and other European) encounters with new worlds and different cultures. These will include accounts of travel, conquest, and colonization written or collected by such writers as Bernal Diaz, Luis de CamoŽs, Columbus, Hakluyt, Raleigh, Harriot, Drake, and Bradford; essays by writers such as Las Casas, Spenser, and Montaigne; and plays, poems, and prose such as Marlowe's Tamburlaine, Shakespeare's The Tempest, Jonson, Chapman, and Marston's Eastward Ho, parts of Spenser's Faerie Queene, Marvell's "Bermudas", and Behn's Oronooko: or the Royal Slave. Key intertexts to these writings will also be studied, along with relevant aspects of postcolonial theory. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3190 Poetics and Politics in Early Modern England F(3-0) [0.50]

This course examines the intimate connections between poetics and politics in Elizabethan and Jacobean literature. The texts to be studied may include plays and poems, as well as essays, political, historical, and theological writings, and works of prose fiction. Close readings of these texts will focus on such issues as kingship, transgression, rhetoric, and the relation between political subjection and literary subjectivity. The course will establish connections between early modern notions of power and its manipulation, and contemporary critical and political discourses in which similar issues are at stake. A wide range of materials chosen from such authors as More, Ascham, Castiglione, Montaigne, Ariosto, Sidney, Puttenham, James I., Nash, Fennor, Bacon, Lyly, Marston, Greene, and Lodge will be examined by way of close readings. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3220 Representing Britain: 18th- & 19th- Century Literature F(3-0) [0.50]

This course explores selected topics in the interrelation of literature and politics from the late seventeenth to the nineteenth century in Britain. Areas of focus may include: the literature of civil war, constitutionalism and revolution; satire and society; writings emerging from suffrage reform and agitation, the colonization of Ireland, the construction of political subjectivity, political paranoia, conspiracy and sedition. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3230 Literary Culture and the English Civil War W(3-0) [0.50]

This course will examine key literary figures and texts in the period leading up to and including the English Civil War (1623-1660). Literary contributions to the political and religious struggles of the period will be studied in the light of a range of different approaches. Primary readings will be selected from among the works of such writers as Milton, Marvell, Charles I, Hobbes, Coppe, Winstanly, Everard, Katherine Philips, Jonson, Webster, Middleton, and Massinger. Reading-intensive course.(Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3260 Writing Gender & Family: 18th- and 19th- Century Literature W(3-0) [0.50]

This course will explore texts which engage with such matters as the shifting constructions of the family, changing sexual practices, ideals of femininity and masculinity, and the significance of the separation of spheres in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century writing. Focal points may include: the role of desire in narrative; literary representations of gender and economics, of gender and medicine, and of pivotal figures such as the prostitute, the governess, the rake, or the gentleman. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3280 Early English Literature U(3-0) [0.50]

This course will focus on the language, literature, and culture of Anglo-Saxon England (7th to 11th centuries). In addition to acquiring the rudiments of Old English and engaging in translation exercises with short passages from Anglo-Saxon texts, students will read a selection of texts in modern English translation; these will include Beowulf, the Battle of Maldon, elegies such as the Seafarer, riddling poems and religious poems. In reading these texts, which may be supplemented with intertexts from other northern European cultures, students will be encouraged to reflect on such issues as the processes by which early English culture affiliated itself to Judaeo-Christian and Hellenic traditions. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in alternate years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3300 Restoration to Romanticism: Forging the Nation F(3-0) [0.50]

Drawing upon a range of literary texts from a variety of genres, this course will explore the politics of language and style in a series of cultural debates that shaped British national character from the late seventeenth to the late eighteenth centuries. Selected topics may include: literary representations of religious establishment and dissent; the division of power; the question of minority cultures; revolution and reaction; the problem of economic stability. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3320 Romanticism to Victorianism: Culture and Conformity F(3-0) [0.50]

This course explores the key texts in various genres of British cultural debates of the late eighteenth to the late nineteenth century. Focal points may include: literary representations of family and society; science and narrative; Britain's "others"; class and conflict; protest and power; the roots of modernism; European influences. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3340 British Imperial Culture F(3-0) [0.50]

This multi-genre course introduces students to the literature of British imperialism in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The course will consider the changing relationship between nation, empire, and colony by examining literary representations of such topics as: orientalism; travel writing; the construction of race; the representation of trade; the popular literature of empire; children's literature; the question of the other. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3360 Scottish Formations F(3-0) [0.50]

This variable content course explores selected issues, ideas and periods of this national literature, including influences on immigrant and world literature. Topics may include: mythologizing the Celt; Scottish writers and English critics; sovereignty and nationhood; "new wave" writing; Scottish influences on the Canadian canon; witches, devils, and folk tales. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3370 Narrative Modes: 18th- and 19th-Century Literature W(3-0) [0.50]

This course offers comparative study of narrative structures, which includes selections from such genres as poetry, fiction, biography, autobiography and specialized discourses. Focal points may include romance; the gothic; the novel of sensibility; the realist novel; sensation fiction; the discourses of medicine and science. Reading intensive course. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3380 Studies in the History of Literary Production W(3-0) [0.50]

This course will examine a range of issues arising from the materiality of book production and circulation. Topics may include serialization; mass production and circulation; patronage; reviewing; circulating libraries; licensing; censorship; children's literature; periodicals; gift books; letters; and other aspects of publishing and the public sphere. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3420 Contemporary Drama W(3-0) [0.50]

British, American and European drama from the Second World War to the present day. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3450 Early Twentieth-Century Drama F(3-0) [0.50]

A study of post-realist developments in modern drama including symbolism, expressionism, surrealism, and epic theatre. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3460 Literature in London W(2-3) [0.50]

A study of British literature in its social and historical context. Reading of particular works will be supplemented by visits to sites of literary interest, the use of special library and museum collections, and attendance at public lectures and performances. For London Semester students only.

Prerequisite(s): admission to the London Semester

ENGL*3470 Twentieth-Century British Literature I W(3-0) [0.50]

This multigenre course explores aesthetic and socio-cultural movements (including modernism) in British literature from the turn of the century to mid-century. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3480 Twentieth-Century British Literature II F(3-0) [0.50]

This multigenre course explores aesthetic and socio-cultural movements (including postmodernism) in British literature from mid-century to the present. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3540 Writing the United States: Forging the Nation F(3-0) [0.50]

This multigenre course explores the relationship between literary production and political power from the emergence of American culture in the seventeenth century to the fragmentation of the United States around the time of the Civil War in the mid-nineteenth century. Areas of focus may include national fantasy; the literature of revolution and federation; narratives of slavery, captivity, and native genocide; immigration and travel literature; the literature of reform, abolition, and the cult of domesticity. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3550 Modern United States Literatures W(3-0) [0.50]

This multigenre course explores powerful examples of twentieth-century United States literatures, from about the First World War to the present. The selection is wide, including both traditional and experimental forms; female and male writers from various ethnic and racial groups; and a range of cultural issues. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3560 Emergent Literary Forms W(3-0) [0.50]

This course will introduce students to a range of medieval writing practices including manuscript culture, oral culture, early drama, literatures in translation, early lyric, and so forth. Its focus will be on the transition from oral to written literatures by way of emergent literary forms in English and other languages. The texts to be studied will be chosen from a corpus that includes the following: Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain, the Lais of Marie de France, Chretien de Troyes, Layamon's Brut, the Mabinogion, Harald's Saga, the Chanson de Roland, extracts from saints' lives, miracle stories, play cycles, and others. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3570 Studies in the Age of Chaucer F(3-0) [0.50]

This course will introduce students to significant aspects of Chaucerian literature while also introducing a range of other writings by Chaucer's precursors and near contemporaries chosen from a range of writers that include the following: the Gawain poet, Malory, Wyclif, Lydgate, Langland, Dunbar, Henryson, Margery Kemp, Julian of Norwich, Christine de Pisan, Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3630 Writing Canada: Forging the Nation W(3-0) [0.50]

This multigenre course focusses on Canadian literature to World War One, examining cultural contestation in the Canadian settler colony among the Canadian, U.S., British, and indigenous peoples. Topics may include the rise of nationalist discourse, race and nation, landscape and the sublime, gothic, sentimental, and historical fiction, children's literature, slavery and resistance narratives, travel and captivity narratives. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3660 Canadian Poetry W(3-0) [0.50]

This course is an introductory study of Canadian poetry, in a variety of national and international contexts. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in even-number years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3670 Twentieth-Century Canadian Literature and Criticism I F(3-0) [0.50]

This multigenre course examines formations of, and resistances to, ideas of national consciousness and cultural identity in Canadian literature and criticism in English from the beginnings of the twentieth century to the 1960s. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3680 Twentieth-Century Canadian Literature and Criticism II F(3-0) [0.50]

This course examines the role of narrative in Canadian literature and criticism in English, since the 1960s, in relation to a variety of social, cultural, and historical contexts. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3690 History of Literary Criticism F(3-0) [0.50]

This course introduces students to the major critics and texts formative in the development of an English critical tradition. The study will begin with Plato and Aristotle, and proceed from the Renaissance through to modernist critical theory. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3740 United States Imperial Culture F(3-0) [0.50]

This multigenre course will introduce students to a period of intense cultural struggle in the United States, from Civil to First World War (i.e. from the mid-nineteenth to early-twentieth centuries). Topics for consideration may include the literary representation of race, civil war, and empire; machine and mass culture; emergent literatures and changing constituencies of American citizenship. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060, ENGL*1200

ENGL*3750 Studies in Postcolonial Literatures W(3-0) [0.50]

Concentrated study in a major sub-area of postcolonial literature. Specific topics will vary each year, but may involve focus on a particular genre or region such as Africa, Australia, Canada, the Caribbean, India, and the Pacific. (Offered in odd-numbered years)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3760 The Atlantic Diaspora: Colonialism, Resistance, Literatures W(3-0) [0.50]

This course examines literatures in English in the Atlantic colonies (selected from among Canada, the Caribbean, the United States, and Latin America) in the context of movements of peoples and cultures from Africa, Europe, and India across the Atlantic Ocean. Discussion will focus on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century texts addressing such issues as cross-cultural contacts with indigenous peoples, the slave trade and abolition movements, and the kinds of culture developing in these evolving societies. Texts will be selected from among the rich array of poetry, fiction, memoirs, letters, travel accounts, period histories and ethnographies, autobiographies and folkloric records that formed the literary culture of this period. Attention may be paid to diverse forms of oral and written expression, linguistic changes, the Creole continuum, the evolution of national and racial stereotypes, and religious syncretism. Reading-intensive course. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3820 Study in a Major Author W(3-0) [0.50]

This variable-content course provides an intensive study of works by a single writer. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*1060 or ENGL*1200

ENGL*3860 Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies U(3-0) [0.50]

These variable-content courses provide opportunities for topics in cross-period studies, inter- and transdisciplinary studies and cultural studies, among others that are not available in regular offerings. Consult the School for specific offerings in a given semester.

ENGL*3870 Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies U(3-0) [0.50]

These variable-content courses provide opportunities for topics in cross-period studies, inter- and transdisciplinary studies and cultural studies, among others that are not available in regular offerings. Consult the School for specific offerings in a given semester.

ENGL*3880 Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies U(3-0) [0.50]

These variable-content courses provide opportunities for topics in cross-period studies, inter- and transdisciplinary studies and cultural studies, among others that are not available in regular offerings. Consult the School for specific offerings in a given semester.

ENGL*3940 Seminar: Form, Genre, and Literary Value F,W(3-0) [0.50]

This seminar focuses on textual conventions such as form, style, and genre as they inform the interaction between reader and text. The impact of these conventions on the processes of literary production, reception, the production of meaning, and the assessment of literary value will be explored in relation to a limited number of literary works. (Choice of focus and texts to be determined by individual instructors.) Writing- and presentation-intensive course.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2060

ENGL*3960 Seminar: Literature in History F,W(3-0) [0.50]

This course explores the processes by which specific texts or genres emerge from particular historical moments and by which we attempt to reconstruct those historically specific connections. Seminars will focus on such topics as the archive surrounding one text, problems of period and canon, or genres and historical change. (Choice of period and texts will be determined by individual instructors.)Writing- and presentation-intensive course.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2060

ENGL*4040 Seminar: Medieval and Early Modern Literatures U(3-0) [0.50]

This seminar provides the opportunity for intensive study of British literature from the beginnings to 1660.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2060, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)

ENGL*4050 Seminar: 18th- and 19th-Century Literatures U(3-0) [0.50]

This seminar provides the opportunity for intensive study of British literature from 1660 to 1900.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2060, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)

ENGL*4070 Seminar: United States Literatures U(3-0) [0.50]

This seminar provides the opportunity for intensive study of American literature.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2060, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)

ENGL*4080 Canadian Literatures U(3-0) [0.50]

This seminar provides the opportunity for intensive study of Canadian literature.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2060, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)

ENGL*4100 Special Studies in English U(3-0) [0.50]

A seminar designed to provide students in semesters 7 and 8 with an opportunity to pursue studies in an area or areas of language or literature not available in other courses. The course may be taught by a visiting professor or members of the department.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2060, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)

ENGL*4110 Special Studies in English U(3-0) [0.50]

A seminar designed to provide students in semesters 7 and 8 with an opportunity to pursue studies in an area or areas of language or literature not available in other courses. The course may be taught by a visiting professor or members of the department.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2060, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)

ENGL*4200 Postcolonial Literatures U(3-0) [0.50]

This course provides the opportunity for intensive study of a representative selection of literature in English by writers from Africa, India, the Caribbean, Australia, and the Pacific.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2060, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)

ENGL*4210 Modern and Contemporary Literatures U(3-0) [0.50]

This course provides the opportunity for a study of significant works in fiction, poetry, and drama that demonstrate new approaches in form and content characteristic of 20th-century writings in English.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2060, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)

ENGL*4220 Special Topics in Women's Writings U(3-0) [0.50]

This course provides for intensive study of issues relating to the aesthetic strategies, such as those associated with structure, imagery, and language, devised by women writers to reflect women's experience and perceptions.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2060, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)

ENGL*4680 Seminar: 20th-Century Poetry U(3-0) [0.50]

Studies in English-language modern and contemporary poetry.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2060, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)

ENGL*4690 Contemporary Literary Theory W(3-0) [0.50]

The study of the major branches of contemporary literary theory. Topics covered will include structuralism, reader-oriented theory, feminist theory, new historicist and materialist critique, postcolonialist critique, and deconstruction.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2060, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)

ENGL*4720 Creative Writing: Prose/Poetry U(3-0) [0.50]

A development and extension of the creative writing/reading skills and techniques introduced in ENGL*2920 and ENGL*2940. This course will involve the generation and revision of challenging new work, sophisticated critique of the work of other students, and focused discussion of the cultural, social, and political issues in which the practice of creative writing is enmeshed. Admission to the course is normally dependent on the successful completion of ENGL*2920 or ENGL*2940 and the submission of a portfolio of new work.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2920 or ENGL*2940

Restriction(s): consent of the instructor

ENGL*4810 Directed Reading S,F,W(3-0) [0.50]

This course is intended particularly as preparation for ENGL*4910. The student will design a course of readings and assignments with the instructor, whose consent must first be obtained. This option is intended only for students who have performed particularly well within the honours program. Exceptional students may take ENGL*4810 in preparation for a ENGL*4910 creative writing project.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2060, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)

Restriction(s): consent of the instructor

ENGL*4910 Honours English Essay S,F,W(3-0) [0.50]

A major essay (approx. 25 pages) on some subject of special interest to the student is prepared and written under the direction of a faculty member. Consent of the instructor must be obtained and the subject must be approved by the School prior to the semester in which the course is to be taken. This option is intended only for students who have performed particularly well within the honours program. Exceptional students may use ENGL*4910 for creative writing.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL*2060, (ENGL*2120 or ENGL*2130), (ENGL*3940 or ENGL*3960)

Restriction(s): consent of the instructor



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