University of Guelph 2003-2004 Undergraduate Calendar

XII--Course Descriptions, Physics

Department of Physics.

PHYS*1000 An Introduction to Mechanics F(3-2) [0.50]

A course for physical science students which develops the concepts of mechanics as applied to translational and rotational kinematics and dynamics, equilibrium of rigid bodies, oscillations, gravitation, special relativity and other elements of modern physics. Normally this is part of the two-course unit PHYS*1000 and PHYS*1010.

Prerequisite(s): [1 of 4U Physics, OAC (or equivalent) Physics, PHYS*1020], 4U or OAC (or equivalent) Calculus

Restriction(s): PHYS*1080, PHYS*1110

PHYS*1010 Introductory Electricity and Magnetism W(3-2) [0.50]

A course for physical science students on the phenomena of electromagnetism. Topics include electric charges and fields, electric potential, magnetic fields, waves and electric circuits. Normally this is part of the two-course unit PHYS*1000 and PHYS*1010.

Prerequisite(s): (MATH*1080 or MATH*1200), (1 of 4U Physics, OAC Physics, PHYS*1020)

PHYS*1020 Introductory Physics F,W(3-3) [0.50]

A course stressing the fundamental properties of particles and waves, designed for students without OAC Physics or equivalent. Topics include: the motion of particles, force, field, momentum, energy and associated conservation laws; basic interactions between particles; properties of waves. It is expected that students will have completed Grade 12 or 3U Physics and at least 1 OAC or 4U mathematics credit. This course is intended only for students who require the equivalent of 4U or OAC Physics in order to proceed to PHYS*1000, PHYS*1010, PHYS*1070, PHYS*1080, PHYS*1110, PHYS*1130, PHYS*2040. Students may not take this course for credit if they have passed 4U or OAC Physics (or equivalent). (Also offered through distance education format.)

PHYS*1070 Introductory Physics for the Life Sciences I F,W(3-3) [0.50]

Physics of matter and energy at the macroscopic and microscopic levels, with special emphasis on topics of importance to biology. Topics include properties of waves, acoustics and hearing, optical systems and vision, quantum nature of radiation and its interaction with biomolecules, electricity, high energy radiation and radioactivity.

Prerequisite(s): (1 of 4U Physics, OAC Physics, PHYS*1020), 4U or OAC Mathematics

Restriction(s): PHYS*1130

PHYS*1080 Introductory Physics for the Life Sciences II F,W(3-3) [0.50]

A course complementary to PHYS*1070 with emphasis on some aspects of classical physics important in biology. Topics include mechanics and applications to anatomical problems, fluid statics and dynamics, molecular motion, diffusion, osmosis, and heat. The course is of special importance to students in agriculture, biological science, and human kinetics.

Prerequisite(s): (1 of 4U Physics, OAC Physics, PHYS*1020), (1 of MATH*1000, MATH*1080, MATH*1200, PHYS*1070)

Restriction(s): PHYS*1000, PHYS*1110

PHYS*1110 Introductory Physics with Applications I F(3-3) [0.50]

This course is for engineering and environmental science students, and has special emphasis on analytic problem-solving. Topics include statics and dynamics, rotational motion, energy, fluid statics and dynamics, thermodynamics and transport properties. Students taking this course should already have taken MATH*1080 or MATH*1200, or be taking one of these courses concurrently.

Prerequisite(s): 1 of 4U Physics, OAC Physics, PHYS*1020

Restriction(s): PHYS*1000, PHYS*1080

PHYS*1130 Introductory Physics with Applications II W(3-3) [0.50]

This course is for engineering and environmental science students, and uses some calculus in analytic problem-solving. Topics include simple harmonic motion, waves, acoustics, optics, properties and absorption of electromagnetic radiation, blackbody radiation, solar spectrum and flux, electric field and potential, DC circuits, power transmission, nuclear processes, and radioactivity.

Prerequisite(s): (MATH*1080 or MATH*1200), [1 of 4U Physics, OAC Physics (or equivalent), PHYS*1020]

Restriction(s): PHYS*1070

PHYS*1600 Contemporary Astronomy S,F(3-0) [0.50]

A course designed for arts and social science students. Emphasis will be on the interdisciplinary and contemporary aspects of astronomy with the object of providing a perspective of our place in the physical universe. Topics will include the solar system, stars and stellar evolution, pulsars, black holes, quasars and cosmology. Students are encouraged to suggest and participate in discussion on items of special interest. Students with standing in any other 1000 level course credit in physics (except PHYS*1020, PHYS*1800, PHYS*1810) may not use this course for credit. (Also offered through distance education format.)

PHYS*1810 Physics of Music W(3-0) [0.50]

A course designed for arts and social science students with an interest or background in music. The fundamentals of vibrations and waves will be introduced and applied to a study of archetypal instruments. The psychoacoustic basis of pitch and loudness will be discussed. Students who have standing in any other 1000 level physics course, except PHYS*1020, PHYS*1600, PHYS*1800 , may enrol in this course only if they are completing an honours or general B.A. program in Music. In this case, permission of the instructor is required. (Also listed as MUSC*1090.) (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Equate(s): MUSC*1090

PHYS*2030 Biophysics of Excitable Cells W(3-1) [0.50]

An intermediate biophysics course with special emphasis on the physical properties of nerve cells and of biological transducers such as the ear and the eye.

Prerequisite(s): IPS*1220 or 1.00 credit in physics (excluding PHYS*1020, PHYS*1600, PHYS*1800, PHYS*1810)

PHYS*2040 Fundamental Electronics and Sensors W(3-3) [0.50]

An introduction to modern electronics. Topics covered include DC and AC circuit analysis, digital circuits, analog circuits with emphasis on operational amplifiers and analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion. Applications include the interfacing of various sensors to measure physical parameters.

Prerequisite(s): 0.50 credit in university level calculus, (1 of 4U Physics, OAC Physics, PHYS*1020)

PHYS*2260 Experimental Basis of Quantum Physics S, W(3-0) [0.50]

The course investigates and describes the properties of atoms, nuclei and elementary particles in terms of phenomena of modern physics. Topics include wave properties of matter, particle properties of electromagnetic radiation, uncertainty principle, elementary angular momentum, spin and elementary quantum mechanics.

Prerequisite(s): (1 of MATH*1000, MATH*1080, MATH*1200, IPS*1110), (1 of IPS*1220, PHYS*1010, PHYS*2460)

PHYS*2440 Mechanics I F(3-2) [0.75]

This course and the following one, PHYS*2450, continue building the foundation in mechanics begun in the first year. These courses are intended for students proceeding to advanced studies in the physical sciences. Topics include analysis of experimental uncertainties (errors), one, two and three dimensional motion, damped and forced harmonic oscillator, gravitation and orbital motion. The laboratory work requires a formal treatment of error analysis, as well as computer programming for data analysis.

Prerequisite(s): (1 of MATH*1210+, MATH*2080, IPS*1210+), (1 of IPS*1220+, PHYS*1000+, PHYS*1080, PHYS*1110) (+preferred)

PHYS*2450 Mechanics II W(3-2) [0.75]

This course is a continuation of PHYS*2440. Topics include special relativity, noninertial reference frames, dynamics of systems of particles, rigid body dynamics and introductory fluid mechanics.

Prerequisite(s): PHYS*2440

PHYS*2460 Electricity and Magnetism I F(3-2) [0.75]

This course and the following one, PHYS*2470, continue building the foundation in electricity and magnetism begun in the first year. These two courses are intended for students proceeding to advanced studies in the physical sciences. Topics include vector calculus, electric fields, potential, electric work and energy, Gauss's Law, Poisson's and Laplace's equations, capacitors, D.C. circuits, transients and dielectric materials. The laboratory work requires a formal treatment of error analysis, as well as computer programming for data analysis.

Prerequisite(s): (1 of IPS*1220+, PHYS*1010+, PHYS*1070, PHYS*1130), (1 of MATH*1210+, MATH*2080, IPS*1210+) (+preferred)

Co-requisite(s): PHYS*2440

PHYS*2470 Electricity and Magnetism II W(3-2) [0.75]

This course is a continuation of PHYS*2460. Topics include magnetic forces and fields, the Biot-Savart equation, Ampere's Law, magnetic induction, LRC transients, A.C. circuits and magnetic materials.

Prerequisite(s): PHYS*2460

PHYS*2550 Radiation and the Environment F(3-0) [0.50]

This course reviews radiations which occur in the environment and their effects on materials and living systems. These include x-radiation, ultraviolet, visible, infrared, microwave and radio-frequency emissions; acoustical and ultrasonic radiation; and alpha, beta, and gamma radiation from radioactive material. (Offered in even-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): (1 of IPS*1220, PHYS*1010, PHYS*1070, PHYS*1130), 0.50 credit in mathematics at the 1000 level (excluding MATH*1040, MATH*1050)

PHYS*2600 General Astronomy S,F(3-2) [0.50]

An introduction to astronomy: the solar system, the sun, stellar and galactic structure. (Offered in the Fall semester in odd-numbered years.)

Prerequisite(s): 0.50 credit in physics at the 1000 level (excluding PHYS*1600, PHYS*1800, PHYS*1810), 0.50 credit in mathematics at the 1000 level

PHYS*3080 Energy W(3-0) [0.50]

Energy resources and the production, interconversion, consumption and waste of energy in the industrial society. Emphasis is placed on environmental impact, and nuclear fission, solar power and nuclear fusion are examined in detail.

Prerequisite(s): 0.50 credit in physics at the 1000 level (excluding PHYS*1020, PHYS*1600, PHYS*1800, PHYS*1810), 0.50 credit in mathematics at the 1000 level (excluding MATH*1040, MATH*1050)

PHYS*3100 Electronics F(3-2) [0.75]

Topics include: amplifier properties; signal processing using operational amplifiers; introduction to digital electronics, including counters and registers; circuits to convert analog signals to digital and vice-versa; introduction to the physics of semiconductor devices. The laboratory illustrates lecture topics, and a major component consists of techniques to interface a computer to integrated circuits for data acquisition.

Prerequisite(s): PHYS*2470

PHYS*3220 Waves and Optics W(3-0) [0.50]

Standing and travelling waves; normal modes; Fourier series; optics including polarization, interference and diffraction.

Prerequisite(s): PHYS*2440

PHYS*3230 Quantum Mechanics I F(3-1) [0.50]

A formal treatment of quantum mechanics. Topics include wave packets and free particle motion, the Schrodinger equation, harmonic oscillator, piecewise constant potentials, central forces and angular momentum, hydrogen atom.

Prerequisite(s): (CHEM*2070 or PHYS*2260), MATH*2160, (MATH*2170 or MATH*2270), PHYS*2470

PHYS*3240 Statistical Physics I S, F(3-0) [0.50]

Introduction to statistical physics including thermodynamics and statistical mechanics of equilibrium phenomena.

Prerequisite(s): MATH*2200, (PHYS*2260 or PHYS*2440)

PHYS*3400 Advanced Mechanics W(3-0) [0.50]

This course covers Lagrangian mechanics and Hamiltonian mechanics. Topics include least action principles, Poisson brackets, Liouville's theorem, Hamilton- Jacobi theory, the transition to quantum mechanics and introduction to non-linear dynamics.

Prerequisite(s): (MATH*2170 or MATH*2270), PHYS*2450

PHYS*3510 Intermediate Laboratory W(0-6) [0.50]

A modular course for physics students including modern and classical physics experiments. Modules include laboratory instrumentation employing computers, modern physics, waves and optics, molecular physics, biophysics, and solid state physics.

Prerequisite(s): PHYS*2450, PHYS*3100

PHYS*4040 Quantum Mechanics II W(3-0) [0.50]

A second course in quantum mechanics. Topics include spin, linear vector spaces, two-level systems, quantum dynamics, rotations and angular momentum, time dependent perturbation theory, Born approximation.

Prerequisite(s): PHYS*3230

PHYS*4120 Atomic and Molecular Physics F(3-0) [0.50]

The application of quantum theory to atomic and molecular structure, and the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and atoms and simple molecules.

Prerequisite(s): PHYS*3240, PHYS*4040

PHYS*4130 Subatomic Physics W(3-0) [0.50]

This course surveys the field of subatomic physics from radioactive emanations to conjectured subunits of nucleons. Topics include quark models; strong, electromagnetic and weak interactions; isospin, strangeness, conservation laws and symmetry principles; systematics of nuclear properties, nuclear radioactivity, nuclear models and reactions.

Prerequisite(s): PHYS*3230

PHYS*4150 Solid State Physics W(3-0) [0.50]

Bonding in solids, thermal and electrical properties of solids, energy bands, imperfections in solids, properties of semiconductors and insulators. Students taking this course must already have taken PHYS*4040 or be taking it concurrently.

Prerequisite(s): PHYS*4240

Co-requisite(s): PHYS*4040 (if not taken as a pre-requisite)

PHYS*4180 Advanced Electromagnetic Theory F(3-0) [0.50]

Radiation from localized charge-current distributions (atoms, molecules, nuclei, antennae), electromagnetic potentials,gauge transformations, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms, multipole expansions of electrostatic and magnetostatic fields, and a selection of topics from: radiation damping, Lorentz electron theory, wave guides, plasmas, relativistic electrodynamics, radiation scattering.

Prerequisite(s): PHYS*2470, PHYS*3400

PHYS*4240 Statistical Physics II F(3-0) [0.50]

A continuation of PHYS*3240 including a discussion of the grand canonical distribution, quantum statistics, and transport theory.

Prerequisite(s): PHYS*3240, (1 of CHEM*3860, PHYS*2260, PHYS*3230)

PHYS*4500 Advanced Physics Laboratory F(0-6) [0.50]

A modular course for students in any physics-related major who will study techniques of nuclear, solid state and molecular physics.

Prerequisite(s): PHYS*2450, PHYS*3100

PHYS*4510 Advanced Physics Project W(0-6) [0.50]

Students will be assigned projects related to their individual interests. These projects may be part of the ongoing research within the Physics Department. Selection of a faculty supervisor and approval of course coordinator must be obtained before course selection.

Prerequisite(s): PHYS*3510

PHYS*4540 Molecular Biophysics W(3-0) [0.50]

Physical methods of determining macromolecular structure: energetics, intramolecular and intermolecular forces, with applications to lamellar structures, information storage, DNA and RNA, recognition and rejection of foreign molecules.

Prerequisite(s): 0.50 credit in biochemistry, (CHEM*3860 or PHYS*3230)

PHYS*4560 Biophysical Methods F(3-0) [0.50]

An introduction to physical techniques to determine the structure of macromolecules and macromolecular structures of biological interest. The techniques include: differential calorimetry, X-ray and neutron scattering, electron microscopy, Raman and infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, and electron spin resonance. Applications of these techniques in the study of biological membranes will be emphasized. Students taking this course should already have taken PHYS*4240 or be taking this course concurrently.

Prerequisite(s): PHYS*3220, PHYS*4040

Co-requisite(s): PHYS*4240 (if not taken as a prerequisite)

PHYS*4910 Advanced Topics in Physics I U(3-0) [0.50]

The content of this course is determined by the interests of the students. Possible topics include fluid mechanics, theory of elastic solids, general relativity, astrophysics, and chaos.

Prerequisite(s): (MATH*2150 or MATH*2160), (MATH*2170 or MATH*2270), PHYS*2450, PHYS*2470

PHYS*4920 Advanced Topics in Physics II U(3-0) [0.50]

The content of this course is determined by the interests of the students. Possible topics include fluid mechanics, theory of elastic solids, general relativity, astrophysics, and chaos.

Prerequisite(s): (MATH*2150 or MATH*2160), (MATH*2170 or MATH*2270), PHYS*2450, PHYS*2470

PHYS*4930 Advanced Topics in Physics III U(3-0) [0.50]

The content of this course is determined by the interests of the students. Possible topics include fluid mechanics, theory of elastic solids, general relativity, astrophysics, and chaos.

Prerequisite(s): (MATH*2150 or MATH*2160), (MATH*2170 or MATH*2270), PHYS*2450, PHYS*2470

PHYS*1XXX Any PHYS course at the 1000 level [0.00]

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