XII. Course Descriptions

Environmental Sciences

School of Environmental Sciences

Department of Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics

The program in Environmental Sciences is interdisciplinary, involving courses from several different departments. See the B.Sc.(Env.) program information in Section X--Undergraduate Degree Programs.

ENVS*1030 Introduction to Environmental Sciences F (6-0) [1.00]
This course introduces students to what it means to think critically from an environmental sciences perspective. It covers an introduction to: philosophy of science, philosophy of the environment, the evaluation of scientific evidence, and scientific arguments. The course focuses on how we understand and recognize environmental problems, how we decide what to do about them, and what role science can and should play in these discussions.
Restriction(s): ENVS*1100 Registration in the BSC(Env) program or BBRM.EM
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*1060 Principles of Geology S,F,W (3-0) [0.50]
This course provides an introduction to geological principles, their historical development and application to interpreting Earth materials and processes. This course is suitable for those wishing a general knowledge of Earth sciences.
Offering(s): Offered through Distance Education format only.
Equate(s): GEOL*1100
Restriction(s): May not be taken for credit by students in BBRM, BSC or BSC(Env).
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*1100 Fundamentals of Environmental Sciences F (3-0) [0.50]
This course introduces students to what it means to think critically from an environmental sciences perspective. It covers an introduction to: philosophy of science, philosophy of the environment, the evaluation of scientific evidence, and scientific arguments. The course focuses on how we understand and recognize environmental problems, how we decide what to do about them, and what role science can and should play in these discussions.
Restriction(s): ENVS*1030 Not available to students registered in BSC(Env) program and BBRM.EM
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*2030 Meteorology and Climatology F (3-2) [0.50]
This course examines solar and terrestrial radiation; pressure systems and winds; atmospheric stability and vertical motions; air masses and fronts; clouds and precipitation; selected topics in applied meteorology including air pollution. The laboratory emphasizes the analysis and use of atmospheric data for solving environmental problems.
Prerequisite(s): 1 of IPS*1500, MATH*1080, MATH*1200, PHYS*1070, PHYS*1080, PHYS*1130, PHYS*1300
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*2040 Plant Health and the Environment W (3-0) [0.50]
This is an interdisciplinary course on the nature and importance of diseases, insects and abiotic stresses on plant productivity and quality. A case history approach will be used to illustrate the biology of plant pests, the principles of pest population management, and related topics.
Prerequisite(s): BIOL*1040 or (2 of BIOL*1050, BIOL*1070, BIOL*1080, BIOL*1090)
Equate(s): ENVB*2040
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*2060 Soil Science S,F (3-2) [0.50]
This course is an introduction to the principles of soil science - the origin of soils, their classification and interpretation in natural and modified environments. Soil will be studied as a product of the natural environment, with a focus on formation processes and changes which occur when it is modified through use. A variety of uses including agriculture, forestry, recreation, and urban development will be considered.
Offering(s): Also offered through Distance Education format.
Equate(s): SOIL*2010
Restriction(s): AGR*2320.
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*2070 Environmental Perspectives and Choice F (3-0) [0.50]
This is an interdisciplinary approach to environmental issues which offers opportunities to investigate social processes and philosophical considerations with respect to the position and influence of humankind, and the development of social conditions, values and economic activities that have led to our present situation. These investigations are carried out within the context of physical environmental considerations, such as the state of the earth, forests, air water and our use of energy, and will lead the student to a detailed consideration of the future.
Offering(s): Offered through Distance Education format only.
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*2080 Introduction to Environmental Microbiology W (2-3) [0.50]
This course will introduce students to environmental microbiology, with a focus on the important roles of microorganisms in various environments such as soil, water and sediments. Discussion will emphasize the physiology, biochemistry, molecular biology and ecology of microorganisms, and how a good understanding of these microbial processes can enable beneficial applications of microorganisms in biotechnology and bioremediation.
Prerequisite(s): BIOL*1070, BIOL*1090
Restriction(s): ENVM*1020, ENVS*2320
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*2090 Problem Solving in Environmental Biology W (2-2) [0.50]
This course provides an introduction to current issues and problems in environmental biology. Approaches to characterizing and addressing problems through the systematic application of the scientific method will be critically examined. Students will have the opportunity to practice both oral and written presentation skills.
Offering(s): First offering - W21
Prerequisite(s): BIOL*1070, BIOL*1090, CHEM*1050, MATH*1080
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*2120 Introduction to Environmental Stewardship F (3-0) [0.50]
This course provides an introduction to the concepts of resource management, environmental planning and assessment, land stewardship and sustainable development. Case studies of specific issues such as parks and natural heritage conservation, agricultural land loss, and integrated rural resources management will provide insight on approaches to decision making. Included will be discussion of the concept of stewardship as an environmental ethics.
Offering(s): Offered through Distance Education format only.
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*2130 Eating Sustainably in Ontario F,W (3-0) [0.50]
This course is intended to introduce students to the science behind food related issues within the context of Ontario agriculture and food systems. The course will provide students with an overview of the history of agriculture in Ontario and an opportunity to discuss both sides of current debates over food production and associated environmental and human health issues.
Offering(s): Also offered through Distance Education format.
Prerequisite(s): 4.00 credits
Restriction(s): May not be taken by students in the BAS, BBRM, BSC, BSC(Agr) or BSC(Env) programs
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*2210 Apiculture and Honey Bee Biology F,W (3-0) [0.50]
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the broad field of beekeeping. It will include honey bee biology and behaviour, management for honey production, products of the hive, pests and enemies and the value of bees as pollinators of agricultural crops.
Offering(s): Also offered through Distance Education format.
Equate(s): ENVB*2210
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*2230 Communications in Environmental Science F,W (4-0) [0.50]
This course provides students with direct training in the academic skills used in researching and communicating environmental science. Within the context of current problems in environmental science, students will develop skills in library research, statistical interpretation, oral and poster presentation and written communication to diverse audiences. Students will research and report on scientific issues within environmental issues being reported in the media.
Prerequisite(s): 1 of ENVM*1000, ENVM*1200, ENVS*1030
Restriction(s): Registration in BBRM, BSC(Env) or BSC(Agr) programs.
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*2240 Fundamentals of Environmental Geology F (2-3) [0.50]
This course introduces the concepts and real-world examples of environmental issues related to plate tectonics, natural resources and igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary processes and rocks, groundwater and structural geology. Students will develop laboratory skills in rock and mineral identification, geological map interpretation and site characterization.
Prerequisite(s): GEOG*1300
Restriction(s): ENVS*1050
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*2250 Geology of Natural Disasters S,W (3-0) [0.50]
This course will offer insight into the mechanisms of natural geological disasters and their effects on Planet Earth, human civilization and life in general. Events before, during and after geological disasters such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, meteorite impact and climate change will be the focus of this course. This course will not count as a science credit for B.Sc. students.
Offering(s): Offered through Distance Education format only.
Prerequisite(s): 1 of ENVS*1050, ENVS*1060, GEOL*1050, GEOL*1100, GEOG*1300, GEOG*1350
Equate(s): GEOL*2250
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*2270 Impacts of Climate Change F,W (3-0) [0.50]
This course will provide students with an overview of recent research into what climate change means for Canada and Canadians. Students will learn about evidence for significant changes to the Boreal forests and about the potential impacts of climate change on human health through increasing heat waves and the heat stress on individuals. The course is intended to bridge the gap between abstract discussion of the climate and understand what these changes mean at both personal and societal levels.
Offering(s): Also offered through Distance Education format.
Prerequisite(s): Minimum of 4.00 credits
Restriction(s): May not be taken by students in the BAS, BBRM, BSC, BSC(Agr) or BSC(Env) programs
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*2310 Introduction to Biogeochemistry W (4-0) [0.50]
This course introduces aspects of Earth science that are critical to understanding environmental issues with societal impacts. Students will gain a basic understanding of biogeochemical cycling by exploring how biological processes control element fluxes between water, air, and earth materials. Topics of current interest, such as resource extraction, climate change and geoengineering will be discussed in terms of their contributions to major element cycles. Seminars include quantitative exercises, hands-on exercises, and discussions to complement topics covered in the lectures
Prerequisite(s): CHEM*1040, ENVS*1030
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*2330 Current Issues in Ecosystem Science and Biodiversity F (4-0) [0.50]
This course provides an introduction to a range of specific environmental and scientific issues relating to ecological sciences. Issues to be covered include the biology of climate change, forest science and management of terrestrial ecosystems. Three examples of current problems of societal concern will be used as starting points to examine the role of science in addressing them, while developing students' knowledge of the underlying science and its relation to policy and economics.
Prerequisite(s): 1 of BIOL*1050, BIOL*1070, ENVM*1000, ENVM*1200, ENVS*1030
Equate(s): ENVB*2030
Restriction(s): ENVB*3330, ENVS*2150
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3000 Nature Interpretation F,W (2-3) [0.50]
This course explores communication and experiential learning theories and their application to natural history interpretation and environmental education program design and delivery. Students will develop interpretive materials, plan an interpretive walk and deliver the interpretive walk to a community group.
Offering(s): Also offered through Distance Education format.
Prerequisite(s): BIOL*2060
Equate(s): ENVB*3000
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3010 Climate Change Biology S,F (3-0) [0.50]
This course examines the impacts of climate change on living organisms, biological communities and ecosystems. The course focuses on what is known, and what is not known, about the ways in which the suite of changing climate variables influence biological systems.
Offering(s): Also offered through Distance Education format.
Prerequisite(s): BIOL*2060
Equate(s): ENVB*3010
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3020 Pesticides and the Environment F,W (3-0) [0.50]
This course examines the role and use of pesticides by various facets of society and the effect of these pesticides on biological activities in the environment. Preparation of a research proposal is required for the course.
Offering(s): Also offered through Distance Education format.
Prerequisite(s): [BIOL*1040 or (2 of BIOL*1050, BIOL*1070, BIOL*1080, BIOL*1090)], CHEM*1040
Equate(s): ENVB*3030
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3030 Conservation Field Course F (0-6) [0.50]
This course provides an opportunity for students to practice field skills in natural resource sciences. Topics will include forestry, ecological restoration, stream and wetland conservation, park and trail management, and nature conservation. Use of air photography and mapped data together with field guides will be emphasized. Guest professionals will assist with instruction on some topics, providing an opportunity for exposure to careers in this field. The course requires participation in a two week field experience held in early May, followed by field work during the summer, and a reflective evaluation in the Fall semester. This course must be recorded as part of your Fall course section and tuition and compulsory fees will be calculated accordingly. There is an extra fee to partially cover field costs.
Prerequisite(s): 9.00 credits
Equate(s): NRS*3030
Restriction(s): Instructor consent required.
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3040 Natural Chemicals in the Environment F (3-0) [0.50]
This course explores the roles of naturally occurring chemicals in the inter-relationships of organisms, and the historical and current uses of natural chemicals by humans for agricultural and medicinal purposes.
Offering(s): Offered through Distance Education format only.
Prerequisite(s): BIOL*1040 or (2 of BIOL*1050, BIOL*1070, BIOL*1080, BIOL*1090)
Equate(s): ENVB*3040
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3050 Microclimatology W (3-0) [0.50]
This course examines natural and intentionally-modified microclimates near the earth's surface; energy budgets; transport of mass and heat. Familiarization with some instruments for microclimatic measurements will be required.
Prerequisite(s): ENVS*2030
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3060 Groundwater W (3-0) [0.50]
This course provides a general understanding of the physical and chemical processes that operate in the groundwater zone under natural and human-induced conditions. The interrelations between the groundwater regime and the other components of the hydrological cycle are studied. Considerable emphasis is placed on the applied aspects of topics such as exploration, testing and development of aquifers for water supply, the chemical quality of groundwater, and the hydrogeological aspects of waste disposal.
Prerequisite(s): AGR*2320 or ENVS*2060
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3080 Soil and Water Conservation F (3-0) [0.50]
This course examines the processes leading to deterioration of soil and water quality, the impact of deterioration on use, and preventative or corrective measures: soil erosion by water and wind, soil compaction and salinization, drainage channel maintenance, sedimentation and nutrient enrichment of water, conservation programs and policies, and reclamation of severely disturbed soils and saline-sodic soils. Emphasis will be on concepts and solutions to problems in a systems approach.
Offering(s): Offered through Distance Education format only.
Prerequisite(s): 1 of AGR*2320, ENVS*2060, SOIL*2010
Equate(s): SOIL*3080
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3090 Insect Diversity and Biology W (3-3) [0.50]
This course is an overview of insect diversity and biology emphasizing groups of importance in conservation biology, outdoor recreation and economic entomology. Labs focus on insect identification and the development of a small insect collection.
Prerequisite(s): BIOL*1040 or (2 of BIOL*1050, BIOL*1070, BIOL*1080, BIOL*1090)
Equate(s): ENVB*3090
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3100 Internship/Externship in Environmental Sciences S,F,W (0-6) [0.50]
This is a student initiated experiential learning opportunity to be undertaken either on or off campus, and developed in consultation with the Director of the School of Environmental Sciences. Details of the proposed activities will be outlined in a learning contract initiated by the student and agreed by the Director and an appointed project advisor prior to the commencement of the work experience. The supervisor will also provide a description of the project and/or the work experience. This course is intended for experiential learning which does not fit under an academic independent study and which is not part of the co-op work term.
Offering(s): Last offering - Summer 2019
Prerequisite(s): 12.00 credits including (1 of ENVM*1000, ENVM*1200, ENVS*1020, ENVS*1030)
Restriction(s): Director consent required.
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3140 Management of Turfgrass Diseases F (2-2) [0.50]
In this course ecology of turfgrass diseases and cultural methods of management will be emphasized, in addition to field recognition and microscopic diagnosis of diseases. Advances in biological and chemical control measures and their impact on turfgrass ecosystems and surrounding environments will also be discussed.
Prerequisite(s): HORT*2450
Equate(s): ENVB*3160
Restriction(s): DTM*3200
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3150 Aquatic Systems W (3-2) [0.50]
In this course students will be taught how to apply quantitative methods to the analysis of aquatic systems of the earth from many simultaneous perspectives. The material will include the physical, chemical and biological components of the various liquid surficial structures and processes and also how they interact with humans. The economic, social and policy implications of humans interacting with aquatic systems will also be emphasized. The history of the analysis of aquatic systems will be systematically included in the material.
Prerequisite(s): 10.00 credits including (BIOL*1030, BIOL*1040) or (BIOL*1070, BIOL*1090), CHEM*1040
Restriction(s): BIOL*3450
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3180 Sedimentary Environments F (3-3) [0.50]
This course examines the principles of sedimentology and stratigraphy as applied to various ancient and modern sedimentary systems. Students will learn to describe and interpret sedimentary deposits in terrestrial and marine systems as well as the larger forces that control the preservation and evolution of these sedimentary systems over geological time. The course includes several field trips.
Prerequisite(s): ENVS*1050 or ENVS*2240
Restriction(s): ENVS*2400
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3210 Plant Pathology F (2-3) [0.50]
This course examines the nature of disease in plants, including their causal agents, etiology, biology, epidemiology, and management. Emphasis is placed on the historical and social importance of plant diseases, and on current issues in plant health. Each student is required to make a collection of 20 plant disease specimens. Students must contact the course instructor before starting their collection.
Prerequisite(s): 1 of BIOL*1040, BIOL*1050, BIOL*1070
Equate(s): ENVB*3210
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3220 Terrestrial Chemistry F (4-0) [0.50]
This course surveys the behaviour of elements in the Earth's surface environments, encompassing soils and saturated (wetland, lake, river) sediments. The course is focused on understanding the factors that control the chemical processes governing soils and freshwater sediments through the reactions of the elements and molecules that they contain. Students will extend their fundamental understanding of chemistry to the materials of the Earth's upper crust.
Prerequisite(s): CHEM*1050, ( 1 of ENVS*1050, ENVS*2060, ENVS*2240)
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3230 Agroforestry Systems F (2-2) [0.50]
The planned and systematic integration of trees into the agricultural landscape can potentially result in sustainable environmental, ecological, economic and social benefits. The key aspects of deriving these benefits, associated science and management considerations, application potentials at the landscape level and adoption challenges will be discussed. Common temperate and tropical agroforestry systems (e.g. intercropping of trees and crops) will be discussed. Emphasis will be given to successful research and development case studies.
Prerequisite(s): 5.00 credits, (1 of BIOL*1040, BIOL*1050, BIOL*1070)
Equate(s): ENVB*3230
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3250 Forest Health and Disease F (2-2) [0.50]
The impact of beneficial and pathogenic microorganisms on forest health, and the biology and management of tree diseases in natural and urban ecosystems is covered in this course. Emphasis will be placed on ecological processes, host-pathogen interactions, mutualistic associations, wood decay, and human impacts on tree health.
Prerequisite(s): 1 of BOT*2100, ENVB*2030, ENVS*2040, ENVS*2330
Equate(s): ENVB*3250
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3270 Forest Biodiversity W (4-0) [0.50]
This course examines biodiversity in forest ecosystems at a variety of scales from genes to landscapes. Relationships between biodiversity and forest ecosystem structure, function, and stability are explored. Approaches to conserving biodiversity in managed forests are discussed and evaluated. Analysis of the relevant scientific literature and practical experience with methods of quantifying biodiversity are emphasized in the weekly seminar.
Prerequisite(s): 1 of BIOL*2060, BOT*3050, ENVS*2330
Equate(s): ENVB*3270
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3290 Waterborne Disease Ecology F (3-2) [0.50]
This course examines emerging and re-emerging waterborne diseases (bacterial, protozoan, and viral) as a function of environmental change (including chemical and biological pollution and climate change). Waterborne diseases, in freshwater and marine ecosystems, will be examined from historical and contemporary issues as they relate to public and environmental health from regional, national, and international perspectives. Topics presented within the course will include current waterborne diseases of humans and aquatic fauna, detection of waterborne pathogens, microbial evolution, microbial physiology, water regulations and protection of drinking water.
Prerequisite(s): (ENVS*2080 or ENVS*2320 or [MBG*2040, (BIOL*2060 or MICR*2420)]
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3300 Introduction to Controlled Environment Systems W (3-0) [0.50]
Canada is among the world’s leading providers of research and technology development devoted to “biological life support” for humans on long duration space exploration missions. Students will be exposed to the broad scope of research activities and infrastructure at the UoG's Controlled Environment Systems Research Facility which represents Canada's main contribution to this field internationally. Discussions will focus on the technical challenges faced by space explorers and how the solutions relate to knowledge and technology transfer to Earth-based problems in issues from the environment to the economy. Students will prepare papers and discussions on relevant topics.
Prerequisite(s): BIOL*1070
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3310 Soil Biodiversity and Ecosystem Function W (4-0) [0.50]
Soils are the site of complex interactions between minerals, water, air, organic matter and living organisms. This course will focus on the organisms that live in the soil and their activities in soil ecosystems, soil as a habitat for organisms, the key role of microorganisms in nutrient cycles and plant-microbe relationships and will review basic soil microbial and ecological principles.
Prerequisite(s): 10.00 credits including (1 of AGR*2320, ENVS*2060, SOIL*2010)
Equate(s): ENVS*3200, SOIL*3200
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3340 Use and Management of Environmental Data F (2-3) [0.50]
This course is focused on finding, collecting and interpreting data of the physical environment. Students will access various online databases, such as meteorological and hydrological time series, and perform and interpret statistical analysis with the data. Issues around calibration and data collection will be explored by performing calibrations and experiments. Students will make a numerical simulation of a dynamic environmental phenomenon. Students will learn to build and query a relational database with both qualitative and quantitative data.
Prerequisite(s): 1 of GEOG*2460, STAT*2040, STAT*2060
Restriction(s): ENVS*4110
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3370 Terrestrial Ecosystem Ecology W (3-0) [0.50]
In this course, the ecosystem is the biological level of organization of interest. Living organisms and their physical environment are considered as components of an integrated system. Key ecosystem processes such as energy flow, carbon and nutrient cycling, and succession, and the controls on these processes, are examined. The impacts of human activity and global change on ecosystem structure and function are investigated.
Prerequisite(s): BIOL*2060 or ENVS*2330
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3410 Independent Research I S,F,W (0-6) [0.50]
In this course the student will undertake an independent research project of a practical or theoretical nature that relates to environmental sciences and is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member. This course introduces third year students to independent research. Projects may be designed to be completed in a single semester, or they may be designed to be completed over two semesters, in conjunction with ENVS*3420. Students must make arrangements with both a faculty supervisor and the course coordinator at least one semester in advance. A school registration form must be obtained from the course coordinator and submitted no later than the second class day of the semester in which the course is taken.
Offering(s): Last offering - Summer 2019
Prerequisite(s): Minimum of 10.00 credits. Minimum cumulative average of 70%.
Restriction(s): ENVS*3430 Instructor consent required. Restricted to students in BBRM.EM, BSC(Env), BSC(Agr) or BSCH.
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3420 Independent Research II S,F,W (0-6) [0.50]
In this course the student will undertake an independent research project of a practical or theoretical nature that relates to environmental sciences and is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member. This course introduces third year students to independent research. Projects may be a continuation of research conducted in ENVS*3410, or they may be on a separate research topic. Students must make arrangements with both a faculty supervisor and the course coordinator at least one semester in advance. A school registration form must be obtained from the course coordinator and submitted no later than the second class day of the semester in which the course is taken.
Offering(s): Last offering - Summer 2019
Prerequisite(s): ENVS*3410. Minimum of 10.00 credits. Minimum cumulative average of 70%.
Restriction(s): ENVS*3430 Instructor consent required. Registration in BBRM.EM, BSC(Env), BSC(Agr) or BSCH.
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3430 Independent Research S,F,W (0-12) [1.00]
In this course the student will undertake an independent research project of a practical or theoretical nature that relates to environmental sciences and is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member. This course introduces third year students to independent research. This project course is designed to allow students to complete a longer, more in-depth project within a single semester. Students must make arrangements with both a faculty supervisor and the course coordinator at least one semester in advance. A school registration form must be obtained from the course coordinator and submitted no later than the second class day of the semester in which the course is taken.
Offering(s): Last offering - Summer 2019
Prerequisite(s): Minimum of 10.00 credits. Minimum cumulative average of 70%.
Restriction(s): ENVS*3410, ENVS*3420 Instructor consent required. Registration in BBRM.EM, BSC(Env), BSC(Agr) or BSCH.
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3510 Independent Study I S,F,W (0-6) [0.50]
This course introduces students to independent research and study. Students will undertake a project based on research in the literature that relates to environmental sciences. Projects may be designed to be completed in a single semester, or they may be designed to be completed over two semesters, in conjunction with ENVS*3520. Students must make arrangements with both a faculty supervisor and the course coordinator at least one semester in advance. A School registration form must be obtained from the course coordinator and submitted no later than the second class day of the semester in which the course is taken.
Offering(s): Last offering - Summer 2019
Prerequisite(s): Minimum of 10.00 credits. Minimum cumulative average of 70%.
Restriction(s): ENVS*3530 Instructor consent required. Restricted to students in BBRM.EM, BSCH, BSC(Agr) or BSC(Env).
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3520 Independent Study II S,F,W (0-6) [0.50]
This course introduces students to independent research and study. Students will undertake a project based on research in the literature that relates to environmental sciences. Projects may be a continuation of research conducted in ENVS*3510, or they may be on a separate research topic. Students must make arrangements with both a faculty supervisor and the course coordinator at least one semester in advance. A School registration form must be obtained from the course coordinator and submitted no later than the second class day of the semester in which the course is taken.
Offering(s): Last offering - Summer 2019
Prerequisite(s): ENVS*3510. Minimum cumulative average of 70%.
Restriction(s): ENVS*3530 Instructor consent required. Restricted to students in BBRM.EM, BSCH, BSC(Agr) or BSC(Env).
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*3530 Independent Study S,F,W (0-12) [1.00]
This course introduces students to independent research and study. Students will undertake a project based on research in the literature that relates to environmental sciences. This project course is designed to allow students to complete a longer, more in-depth project within a single semester. Students must make arrangements with both a faculty supervisor and the course coordinator at least one semester in advance. A School registration form must be obtained from the course coordinator and submitted no later than the second class day of the semester in which the course is taken.
Offering(s): Last offering - Summer 2019
Prerequisite(s): Minimum of 10.00 credits. Minimum cumulative average of 70%.
Restriction(s): ENVS*3510, ENVS*3520 Instructor consent required. Restricted to students in BBRM.EM, BSCH, BSC(Agr) or BSC(Env).
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4000 Toxicological Risk Assessment W (3-0) [0.50]
This advanced course will give students a working knowledge of current processes and techniques for toxicological risk characterization. The course material will cover problem definition, effect characterization, exposure characterization, risk assessment and risk management decision making.
Prerequisite(s): TOX*2000
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4001 Project in Environmental Sciences F (3-0) [0.50]
First part of the two-semester course ENVS*4001/2. Refer to ENVS*4001/2 for course description.
Equate(s): ENVS*4011
Restriction(s): 12.00 credits, Registration in the BSC(Env) program.
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4001/2 Project in Environmental Sciences F-W (3-0) [1.00]
The course permits the student the opportunity to integrate both the skills and knowledge acquired in earlier courses through application to current environmental problems and issues. Group research problems and exposure to critical environmental policy issues will form the core elements of the course. This is a two-semester course offered over consecutive semesters. When you select it you must select ENVS*4001 in the Fall semester and ENVS*4002 in the Winter semester. A grade will not be assigned to ENVS*4001 until ENVS*4002 is completed.
Equate(s): ENVS*4011/2
Restriction(s): 12.00 credits, Registration in the BSC(Env) program.
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4002 Project in Environmental Sciences W (3-0) [0.50]
This is the second part of the two-semester course ENVS*4001/2. Refer to ENVS*4001/2 for course description.
Prerequisite(s): ENVS*4001
Equate(s): ENVS*4012
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4070 Pollinator Conservation W (3-0) [0.50]
This course will explore the ecology of pollination with an emphasis on the roles animals play in pollen movement. Students will critically examine hypothesized drivers of regional, national and global pollinator declines, and the range of potential strategies suggested to mitigate or reverse these declines. Students will examine the efficacy of a wide range of pollinator conservation strategies in different geographical, ecological and economic contexts to help them build an understanding of the available toolbox for conservation.
Prerequisite(s): BIOL*3130
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4090 Soil Management F (3-1) [0.50]
A lecture-tutorial course on the practical aspects of soil management for crop production as they relate to the physical, chemical and biological properties of soils; major emphasis is placed on soil fertility as related to field soil properties and fertilizer, lime and manure use, soil and plant testing for mineral nutrients. The beneficial aspects of drainage, irrigation, erosion control and related tillage practices on soil fertility are also presented. Due regard is given to both economic and environmental aspects of soil management practices.
Prerequisite(s): 1 of AGR*2301/2, AGR*2320, ENVS*2060, SOIL*2010
Equate(s): SOIL*4090
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4100 Integrated Management of Invasive Insect Pests W (3-3) [0.50]
This course explores the concept of integrated pest management as it applies to the mitigation of invasive insect pests associated with agricultural and forest ecosystems.
Prerequisite(s): 1 of CROP*3300, CROP*3310, ENVB*2040, ENVB*3090, ENVS*2040, ENVS*3090, HORT*3280, HORT*3350, HORT*3510
Equate(s): ENVB*4100
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4160 Soil and Nutrient Management F (4-3) [0.50]
This course consists of the same lectures and seminars as (ENVS*4090 or SOIL*4090), but with an additional laboratory. The laboratory portion will focus on the regulatory requirements as stated under the Nutrient Management Act, 2001. Students will discuss nutrient management issues and gain practical experience using the NMAN software program.
Prerequisite(s): 1 of AGR*2301/2, AGR*2320, ENVS*2060, SOIL*2010
Equate(s): SOIL*4130
Restriction(s): ENVM*1070. (ENVS*4090 or SOIL*4090).
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4180 Insecticide Biological Activity and Resistance W (4-0) [0.50]
This course explores the diverse modes of action of botanical, microbial and synthetic insecticides. Detoxification mechanisms, selectivity, resistance management and the process of pesticide discovery and development are also considered. The course includes a review of insect physiological systems and discussion of the stability and distribution of pesticides in the environment.
Offering(s): Offered in even-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): Minimum of 12.00 credits
Restriction(s): ENVB*4240. Registration in the BAS, BBRM, BSC, BSC(Agr) or BSC(Env) program
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4190 Biological Activity of Herbicides W (3-0) [0.50]
This course explores the diverse modes of action of botanical, microbial and synthetic herbicides. Detoxification mechanisms, selectivity, resistance management and the process of herbicide discovery and development are also considered. The course includes a review of plant physiological systems and discussion of the stability and distribution of herbicides in the environment.
Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): Minimum of 12.00 credits
Restriction(s): ENVB*4240. Registration in the BAS, BBRM, BSC, BSC(Agr) or BSC(Env) program.
Department(s): Department of Plant Agriculture
ENVS*4210 Meteorological and Environmental Instrumentation W (3-0) [0.50]
This course covers the design and implementation of measurement systems for atmospheric and environmental studies. Principles of operation and practical consideration of various meteorological and soil sensors will be discussed along with overall design and implementation procedures for environmental monitoring. Students will propose and perform a small independent experiment or field measurement of their own design.
Prerequisite(s): 1 of ENVS*3050, ENVS*3130, ENVS*3340, PHYS*3100
Equate(s): MET*4210
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4230 Biology of Aquatic Insects F (2-3) [0.50]
This course is a study of the adult and immature forms of aquatic insects. Students are required to present a collection of at least 200 insect specimens identified to genus.
Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): ENVB*3090 or ENVS*3090
Equate(s): ENVB*4220
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4260 Field Entomology F,W (1-6) [0.50]
This course is taught in late April or May. Students may enroll in either the preceding Winter semester or following Fall semester. The course provides an introduction to insect sampling, observation, identification, and experimentation in field settings. Student activities are divided equally between observing, collecting and identifying specimens from more than 20 families and an experimental component involving one or more studies to test hypotheses about the ecology or behaviour of insects. There are occasional lectures and discussions to highlight particularly interesting observations of insects. Student evaluation is based on the student's insect collection and associated logbook, a written paper describing their experiment, contributions to class discussions and activities, and peer evaluation. The field site is generally in the USA or South America. Course fees cover costs of room, board, supplies, and transportation to the field site(s). This course must be recorded as part of the student's Fall or Winter course selection and tuition and compulsory fees will be calculated accordingly. Detailed information is available from the Office of the Director - School of Environmental Sciences.
Prerequisite(s): (ENVB*3090 or ENVS*3090) or (ENVB*4040 or ENVS*4040)
Equate(s): ENVB*4260
Restriction(s): Instructor consent required.
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4320 Laboratory and Field Methods in Soil Biodiversity W (1-3) [1.00]
This course will use a hand-on approach to investigate concepts and develop skills needed for understanding key soil functions. Emphasis will be on the transformation of nutrients and contaminants in soils and groundwater by microorganisms. Approaches for analyzing microbial populations and activities in the environment, including molecular techniques will be covered.
Prerequisite(s): ENVS*3200 or ENVS*3310
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4350 Forest Ecology F (3-3) [0.50]
This course will explore aspects of forest ecology with an emphasis on the ecological principles needed for sound forest management. Biotic and abiotic components of forest ecosystems will be discussed in the context of energy flow, nutrient cycling, forest succession and appropriate silvicultural systems.
Prerequisite(s): BIOL*2060 or ENVS*2330
Equate(s): ENVB*4780
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4360 Glacial Environments W (4-0) [0.50]
This course will explore modern to ancient glacial environments, focusing on the sedimentary record they leave behind and applications of glacial geology including reconstructing past environments, examining how glacial deposits affect the distribution of resources or groundwater contaminants, and discovering the response of glaciers to recent and past climate change. Students will develop skills in critically evaluating literature and geological data, description and identification of glacial deposits.
Prerequisite(s): ENVS*2400 or ENVS*3180
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4370 Environmental Organic Chemistry W (3-0) [0.50]
This course discusses the chemical processes that influence organic compounds in the environment, including both anthropogenic organic compounds, such as pollutants and pesticides, and natural organic matter, such as humic materials and biomolecules. Topics include: the occurrence of organic contamination in the environment, emerging classes of organic contaminants, the relationship between molecular structure and environmental fate, persistent organic pollutants, the transformation of organic molecules in the environment, and the origins and functionality of natural organic matter in terrestrial and aquatic environments.
Prerequisite(s): ENVS*3220
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4390 Soil Variability and Land Evaluation F (3-2) [1.00]
This course integrates formal in-field (including a two-day camp & excursions during orientation week) and laboratory training, with classroom discussions of concepts, to guide independent group projects on the gathering and interpreting of soilscape information. The principal focus is on soil, as a spatially- and temporally-variable product and component of ecosystems; special consideration is given to the factors controlling soil processes, from local to global scales. An examination of methods, for describing and quantifying the distribution of soils, includes survey and sensor-based techniques, in conjunction with data trend analysis and modelling. Students are required to notify the instructor in the preceding Winter semester of their intention to participate.
Prerequisite(s): 15.00 credits including (1 of AGR*2320, ENVS*2060, ENVS*2310, ENVS*2340, SOIL*2010)
Restriction(s): ENVS*3120, ENVS*4150, ENVS*4250, SOIL*4250.
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4410 Introduction to Advanced Independent Research S,F,W (1-0) [0.50]
In this course the student will undertake an independent research project of a practical or theoretical nature that relates to environmental sciences and is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member. This course is designed to provide senior undergraduate students with an introduction to independent research work. The course includes work with a faculty advisor to develop a research project, formulate hypotheses/objectives, design and conduct preliminary experiments to test the hypotheses. Students must make arrangements with both a faculty supervisor and the course coordinator at least one semester in advance. A school registration form must be obtained from the course coordinator and submitted no later than the second class day of the semester in which the course is taken.
Prerequisite(s): Minimum of 10.00 credits. Minimum cumulative average of 70%.
Restriction(s): Registration in BSC(Env), BSC(Agr), BSCH or BBRM. Instructor consent required.
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4420 Advanced Independent Research S,F,W (1-0) [0.50]
In this course the student will undertake an independent research project of a practical or theoretical nature that relates to environmental sciences and is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member. This course is designed to provide a research intensive experience. This course is designed to be the completion of the research proposal developed in ENVS*4410. In this course the student will undertake an independent research project of a practical or theoretical nature that relates to environmental sciences and is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member. This course is designed to provide a research intensive experience. This course is designed to be the completion of the research proposal developed in which the course is taken.
Prerequisite(s): ENVS*4410. Minimum cumulative average of 70%.
Restriction(s): ENVS*4430. Registration in BSC(Env), BSC(Agr), BSCH or BBRM. Instructor consent required.
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4430 Advanced Independent Research S,F,W (0-12) [1.00]
In this course the student will undertake an independent research project of a practical or theoretical nature that relates to environmental sciences and is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member. This course is designed to be the completion of the research proposal developed in ENVS*4410 by the student in consultation with a faculty advisory. This course can be selected in place of ENVS*4420 if the student and faculty advisor deem the project to be of sufficient scope to necessitate a 1.00 credit course. Students must arrangements with both a faculty supervisor and the course coordinator at least one semester in advance. A school registration form must be obtained from the course coordinator and submitted no later than the second class day of the semester in which the course is taken.
Prerequisite(s): ENVS*4410. Minimum cumulative average of 70%.
Restriction(s): ENVS*4420. Registration in BSC(Env), BSC(Agr), BSCH or BBRM. Instructor consent required.
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4510 Topics in Environmental Sciences S,F,W (0-0) [0.50]
This course provides an opportunity for students to engage in advanced independent research and study. Students will undertake a project based on research in the literature that relates to environmental sciences. Projects will be designed to be completed in a single semester. Students must make arrangements with both a faculty supervisor and the course coordinator at least one semester in advance. A School registration form must be obtained from the course coordinator and submitted no later than the second class day of the semester in which the course is taken.
Prerequisite(s): Minimum of 10.00 credits. Minimum cumulative average of 70%.
Restriction(s): Restricted to students in the BBRM.EM, BSCH, BSC(Agr), BSC(Env) Instructor consent required.
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4520 Advanced Independent Study II S,F,W (0-6) [0.50]
This course provides an opportunity for students to engage in advanced independent research and study. Students will undertake a project based on research in the literature that relates to environmental sciences. Projects may be a continuation of research conducted in ENVS*4510, or they may be on a separate research topic. Students must make arrangements with both a faculty supervisor and the course coordinator at least one semester in advance. A School registration form must be obtained from the course coordinator and submitted no later than the second class day of the semester in which the course is taken.
Offering(s): Last offering - Summer 2019
Prerequisite(s): ENVS*4510. Minimum of 14.00 credits. Minimum cumulative average of 70%.
Restriction(s): Restricted to students in the BBRM.EM, BSCH, BSC(Agr), BSC(Env) Instructor consent required.
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
ENVS*4530 Advanced Independent Study S,F,W (0-12) [1.00]
This course provides an opportunity for students to engage in advanced independent research and study. Students will undertake a project based on research in the literature that relates to environmental sciences. This project course is designed to provide an intensive study experience that is completed in a single semester. Students must make arrangements with both a faculty supervisor and the course coordinator at least one semester in advance. A School registration form must be obtained from the course coordinator and submitted no later than the second class day of the semester in which the course is taken.
Offering(s): Last offering - Summer 2019
Prerequisite(s): (1 of ENVS*3510, ENVS*3520, ENVS*3530). Minimum of 14.00 credits. Minimum cumulative average of 70%.
Restriction(s): ENVS*4510, ENVS*4520. Restricted to students in the BBRM.EM, BSCH, BSC(Agr), BSC(Env). Instructor consent required.
Department(s): School of Environmental Sciences
University of Guelph
50 Stone Road East
Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1
Canada
519-824-4120