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Indigenous Student Advising

From mainstream counselling to visiting with Elders, there are a number of ways First Nations, Métis and Inuit students (both undergraduate and graduate) can access support. This can be an informal chat or something more structured, depending on your comfort.

Whether you're having a bad day, have received unexpected news, or have been wrestling with something for a long time, you don't have to deal with it alone. Everyone experiences confusion and uncertainty sometimes.

The support provided through the Indigenous Student Centre can be a chance to talk things through, seek advice or simply share with someone who will respect the challenges you're experiencing.

Indigenous Student Advisor

The Indigenous Student Advisor is here to support you and walk beside you throughout your learning journey here at the University of Guelph. Here are some of the ways the Indigenous Student Advisor can assist you:

  • Personal counselling and wellness support
  • Academics
  • Tutoring
  • Finances
  • Culture and identity
  • and more...

Please reach out to me with any questions you have as you navigate your time at the U of G.

Natasha Young, Indigenous Student Advisor
natasha.young@uoguelph.ca

Indigenous Student Counselling

First Nations, Métis and Inuit students are invited to meet with Natasha Young to discuss their counselling needs. You can book a counselling session with Natasha or book a meeting to learn more about Counselling Services and counselling support within the community.

Natasha Young, Indigenous Student Advisor
natasha.young@uoguelph.ca
519-824-4120 Ext. 52189
Book a meeting with the Indigenous Student Advisor

Counselling Services

First Nations, Métis and Inuit students can access Counselling Services in the JT Powell Building.  They offer individual and group counselling to support students as they work through the personal challenges that affect their ability to succeed at school and in other areas of their lives. 

Cultural Advising & Supports

What is an Elder and Knowledge Keeper?

Elders and Knowledge Keepers hold a significant role in First Nations, Inuit and Métis cultures. In the community, they are considered to be respected leaders, advisors, teachers, and caregivers. They possess a wealth of knowledge, skills, life experience and wisdom that they are eager to share with the younger generations. 

What do the Elders and Knowledge Keepers do?

Elders and Knowledge Keepers are available at the Indigenous Student Centre to provide personal consultation, conversation, guidance and mentorship to First Nations, Métis & Inuit students and the campus community. They engage with students using a variety of methods including one-on-one sessions, group meetings or classes, sharing or teaching circles, storytelling and ceremony.

The Indigenous Student Centre is able to provide connections for Elders and Knowledge Keepers to guest lecture, speak on a variety of topics, and provide openings, prayers, or drumming at events. Email elders@uoguelph.ca  for more information.

Looking to meet with an Elder or Knowledge Keeper from a particular background? 

Let us know and we'll do our best to connect you with someone from the Guelph area.

Read the profiles of our Elders, Knowledge Keepers and Community Helpers.

Sharing Circles

These Circles are organized for all interested, self-identified First Nations (status and non-status), Inuit and Métis students.  

The Circles will be facilitated either by Natasha Young, Indigenous Student Advisor or by our community Elders, Helpers and Knowledge Holders.

Some Guidelines

There are only a few guidelines for a Sharing Circle:

  • only one person speaks at a time,
  • speak with honesty,
  • listen with respect, and
  • what is said in the circle remains between those who took part.

If you are interested in attending or learning more about sharing circles, please contact Natasha Young, Indigenous Student Advisor at natasha.young@uoguelph.ca or 519-824-4120 Ext. 52189.


After Hours Resources


Journeying Towards Holistic Wellness: A Resource For First Nations, Métis and Inuit Students