Research News

A new zoonotic disease emerges in southern Ontario

diagram of the tapeworm life cycle

Image courtesy J. Kotwa

 

Dogs, humans may be at risk from a new form of tapeworm

By Sydney Pearce

Dogs in southern Ontario are being exposed to a newly identified tapeworm that can infect humans and cause a potentially fatal disease.

Since 2012, five dogs in southern Ontario have been diagnosed with the larval stage of a small tapeworm called Echinococcus multilocularis (EM).

Reports of the disease that EM causes, called alveolar echinococcosis, surprised University of Guelph PhD candidate, Jonathon Kotwa, and Prof. Andrew Peregrine from the...

Read more: A new zoonotic disease emerges in southern Ontario

Using Data Management Plans will keep your research data safe and give your research more exposure

Photo of people sitting in the library with 'data' floating in the air

Photo:  Andrew Goodwin Photography
Graphic overlay: Tiffany Murphy

 

By Liz Snyder

Data Management Plans (DMPs) are becoming a more integrated part of the funding application process.  The U of G will soon be adopting its own Institutional Research Data Management strategy to ensure researchers are mitigating risk and increasing the visibility and impact of their research, one component of which is a DMP – and the Library is ready to help.

Creating a plan to manage data can be an important part of the research process. A DMP describes the methods, protocols and plans a researcher will use to manage, describe,...

Read more: Using Data Management Plans will keep your research data safe and give your research more exposure

New animal care program gives researchers better insights

Photo of cows at LRIC

By Liz Snyder

Animal Care Services has been developing a system to support animal research teams through the life of their research project – and animal researchers at the U of G can soon look forward to even more support with the hiring of a post-approval review coordinator.

To get to this point, for the past two years Animal Care Services has been consulting with Canadian universities that have similar animal care programs and U of G researchers and animal facility managers.  They wanted to see what a good post-approval review program would look...

Read more: New animal care program gives researchers better insights

You can help track wildlife health

infographic about wildlife health surveillance

New online tool gets the public involved

By Sydney Pearce

Tracking wildlife health is too large of a task for just one individual, so a wildlife health tracking website (www.wildlifehealthtracker.com), developed by the Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative (CWHC) at the University of Guelph, is getting the public involved.

The initiative is designed to make it easier for the public and groups interested in wildlife health to report sick and dead wild animals they encounter in Ontario, and...

Read more: You can help track wildlife health

Appreciation, growth opportunities and job security motivate hospitality industry workers

Photo of a woman making pizza

By Shannon Mustard

With 10 per cent of the Canadian population employed by the hospitality and tourism industry, it's important to maintain employee motivation - especially during the down season. The biggest challenge in the hospitality industry is attracting and retaining good quality workers. Researchers believe if employers can understand what motivates and drives their employees, they may be able to attract and retain their employees for a longer period of time.

Prof. William Murray, School of Hospitality, Food and Tourism Management, has focused...

Read more: Appreciation, growth opportunities and job security motivate hospitality industry workers

Research charts the course of marijuana 'normalization' prior to legalization and regulation of the drug

A group of young adults at a 420 rally

By Megan Swim

About half of all university students have said they’ve used cannabis at least once, according to research from three Canadian universities. So, what does this mean for the normalization of cannabis use for youth and young adults?

Prof. Andrew Hathaway, of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, has been researching cannabis use since the 1990s. He says cannabis use is not the deviant, addictive habit is has so often been portrayed as, but rather a mainstream phenomenon.

“Back in the 1950s and 1960s, sociologists pegged...

Read more: Research charts the course of marijuana 'normalization' prior to legalization and regulation of the drug

Sexting for women may be empowering

Photo of a woman's hand holding a cellphone

Photo:  Megan Swim

 

By Megan Swim

Society often frowns on the use of sexting – that is, digital technology for sexual purposes -- particularly for women. In some cases, women are more vulnerable for photos going viral or being shown to others without consent, leading to a culture of fear.

But how does this attitude impact women’s sexuality?

In a study last summer, PhD candidate Erin Watson and Prof. Robin Milhausen found sexting provides some women with increased pleasure, desire, and opportunities for sexual communication.

In fact, they say...

Read more: Sexting for women may be empowering

Reducing the digital divide between rural and urban Ontario

Photo of cables being laid. Adobe stock.

By Shannon Mustard

Our e-world requires good connectivity. But that doesn’t always happen in rural areas – even in Halton region, a municipal neighbour to Canada’s biggest city.

Prof. Helen Hambly Odame, School of Environmental Design and Rural Development, is trying to change that. She’s the project leader for the UoG Regional and Rural Broadband (R2B2) project team. In September 2017, the team began collaborating with the Halton area, at the request of the region, in hopes of finding economic reasons to improve its connectivity.

The R2B2 team...

Read more: Reducing the digital divide between rural and urban Ontario

Taking a nutritional approach to reducing diabetes risk

Dr. Dan Ramdath,  PhD student Dita Moravek and Prof. Alison Duncan

Dr. Dan Ramdath (left), PhD student Dida Moravek and Prof. Alison Duncan. Photo:  Shannon Mustard

By Shannon Mustard

This year, 23 million people globally will have been diagnosed with diabetes, the majority being type 2. Could Canadian lentils potentially reduce the risk of diabetes as they help to lower blood sugar levels? That’s what a University of Guelph research team wants to know.

Diabetes is a disorder that causes people to have abnormally high blood sugar levels over a long period of time. Those with diabetes may not have high enough levels of insulin (a hormone that helps reduce glucose levels in the bloodstream), or their insulin is not...

Read more: Taking a nutritional approach to reducing diabetes risk

Leukemia, breast cancer and ovarian cancer research focus of new awards

Profs. Jim Petrik, Marc Coppolino and Paul Spagnuolo

Jim Petrik (left), Marc Coppolino and Paul Spagnuolo. Photo: Shannon Mustard

By Shannon Mustard

 

            New support from the Cancer Research Society is helping advance research by three University of Guelph faculty members—Profs. Marc Coppolino, Jim Petrik and Paul Spagnuolo—to prevent and treat leukemia, breast cancer and ovarian cancer.

Spagnuolo, Department of Food Science, and his team of graduate students are studying how food-derived molecules could treat leukemia.

Their study began five years ago, when they discovered that a fat compound, Avocatin B, in avocados could help reduce the growth of...

Read more: Leukemia, breast cancer and ovarian cancer research focus of new awards