Research News

U of G pet nutrition expert receives research excellence award

Dr. Adronie Verbrugghe demonstrates how to check pet body composition score with DVM students

Dr. Adronie Verbrugghe demonstrates how to check pet body composition score with DVM students.

 

An Ontario Veterinary College (OVC) researcher, who specializes in pet nutrition, has been recognized for research excellence and innovation.

Dr. Adronie Verbrugghe, a professor in OVC’s Department of Clinical Studies, has received a Research Excellence Award from the University of Guelph. Professor Verbrugghe, who is also Royal Canin Veterinary Diet Endowed Chair in Canine and Feline Clinical Nutrition, focuses her research on canine and feline nutrition.

“The impact of nutrition on health is a crucial, incredibly timely area of research,...

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Open Access

laptop open on table, coffee cup to the left, plant to the right, hands typing

 

By Amber Wood

Open Access, a free and unlimited online access framework to scholarly publications, is a way by which to improve knowledge, accelerate discovery and encourage innovation.

In May 2015, Canada introduced the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on publications to mandate open access to research articles funded by Canada's three major research agencies: the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).

...

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Predatory journals

hands typing on a computer keyboard

istock.com/serdjophoto

 

By Amber Wood

As predatory journals become increasingly common in the scholarly publishing landscape, major media outlets like CBC and CTV News have broadcasted cautionary tales to researchers.

The growing concern with predatory journals is that they do not reflect the quality present in the scholarly publishing landscape and can be exploitive of researchers. Predatory publishers exploit the author-pays business model for their own profit. They conduct little to no peer review or editing work thereby hindering the scientific process and...

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Vegan liqueur, skin exfoliant and aluminum foil substitute win big in Project SOY

Project SOY first place undergraduate winners

Vegan liqueur, skin exfoliant and aluminum foil substitute win big in Project SOY

A cream liqueur for vegan- and lactose-intolerant consumers, a soybean-based skin exfoliant and edible soy protein substitute for aluminum foil are this year’s first-place projects at the University of Guelph’s 23rd annual Project SOY competition.

Project SOY (Soybean Opportunities for Youth) is an annual contest that harnesses students' creative power to develop new products and marketing strategies for soybeans. The event, held at the...

Read more: Vegan liqueur, skin exfoliant and aluminum foil substitute win big in Project SOY

Dairy Performance Related to Calf Health

calf laying in hay

Photo courtesy of Caitlin MacLeod

Dairy performance related to calf health

By Alicia Bowland

Poor lung health in calves implicated in long-term negative impacts to dairy production. To maximize productivity and profitability, and to facilitate managerial decision-making, dairy producers need to look at their calves’ lung health. Tricia Dunn, graduate from the department of population medicine at the University of Guelph, and Theresa Olivett from the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine used thoracic ultrasound technology, a non-invasive chest ultrasound, to analyze...

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U of G-Led Network Gets $2 Million to Link Cultural Researchers

Professor Susan Brown

Prof. Susan Brown

U of G-Led Network Gets $2 Million to Link Cultural Researchers 

By Owen Roberts

A unique University of Guelph-based network designed to enhance the usefulness of online materials in cultural research has received a $2-million grant from the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI). The Linked Infrastructure for Networked Cultural Scholarship (LINCS) project is led by Susan Brown, a professor in the School of English and Theatre Studies and Canada Research Chair in Collaborative Digital Scholarship.

Read more: ...

Read more: U of G-Led Network Gets $2 Million to Link Cultural Researchers

The next frontier

Soil sampling in the field

Soil sampling in the field. Photo Courtesy of Laura Van Eerd.

The next frontier

By Owen Roberts

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN agriculture and food is a natural one — at least for producers, who nurture it daily. But the agri-food connection is increasingly becoming a “eureka moment” for the public, too. People are waking up to the realization that agriculture precedes food, and that what they see on their plate comes from complex agri-food systems. As they dig deeper into food production, they’re realizing these agri-food systems depend to a great degree on soil health and preservation. 

...

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Movember has meaning for canines, too

A woman with brown, shoulder-length hair wearing a white lab coat sits with a black and white small dog who wears a red harness and a tag that says "Alfred."  To the right of her sits a man with blond hair, who is wearing a white lab coat.  They are both smiling.  Behind them is a poster of a golden retreiver, lying down and the text "pettrust.ca"

MSc student Charly McKenna (left) and Dr. Tony Mutsaers (right) are photographed with prostate cancer patient Alfred. Photo:  Karen Mantel

New gold nanoparticle cancer therapy technique could help animals and humans

By Samantha McReavy

Canine prostate cancer research at the University of Guelph could help transform future cancer treatments – for pets and humans – making therapy less invasive and more effective. 

Researchers are working to determine the efficacy of a new gold nanoparticle cancer therapy technique for dogs with prostate tumours. University of Guelph professor Dr. Tony Mutsaers, Department of Clinical Studies and Department of Biomedical Sciences is involved in...

Read more: Movember has meaning for canines, too

Fake goods darken Black Friday

A woman's back is to the camera.  Her hair is brown, and shoulder length.  She wears a black sweater and a black and white scarf that says Chanel, Paris on it.

When it's being worn, who knows it's a fake?  Photo: Owen Roberts

 

By Owen Roberts and Ariana Longley

            One of North America’s biggest shopping days, Black Friday, has arrived -- November 23, the day after Thanksgiving Day in the US.

            Since the 1980s, Black Friday has taken conspicuous consumption to the max. It started out innocent enough, with retailers offering super prices to kick start the Christmas shopping season.

            But it’s brought out the worst in consumer behaviour, with shoppers lining up hours before stores open, then trampling each other to get to a deal....

Read more: Fake goods darken Black Friday

3-D printed cat skull helps budding vets learn new skills

A woman has her hands on the 3-D printed cat skull which is black in colour and mounted on a wooden frame.

PhD engineering student Claudia Smith is pictured here with her 3-D printed cat intubation model. Photo: Karen Mantel, OVC

By Sydney Pearce

When engineering meets veterinary science at the U of G, dozens of practice models are developed for learning companion animal medical procedures.

One such model is a 3D-printed model of a cat that permits students to practice tracheal intubation, a procedure that allows (or permits) the delivery of anesthetics and oxygen to the lungs through a tracheal tube.

Many commonly used 3D printers only allow the use of hard plastics. But Claudia Smith, a PhD student from the School of Engineering, infused a variety of soft...

Read more: 3-D printed cat skull helps budding vets learn new skills