Research

Showcasing the success of Partnership programs and research

Sara Stricker in the field with the onions

Ontario onion attacker is in the weeds

A stubborn new fungus is attacking Ontario onions. Luckily, it does not cause food-borne illness, but it could make your onions smaller and more likely to sprout in storage, leading to potential lost revenues for growers and lower-quality onions for consumers.

Gryphon's LAAIR grants help researchers develop products for the growing agri-food sector

From skin care to brewing to plant greenhouses to cows and horses, five projects will receive funding from the Gryphon’s LAAIR program this year to help researchers pursue research innovations with commercial potential.

The Gryphon’s LAAIR (Leading to the Accelerated Adoption of Innovative Research) program, funded by the Government of Ontario through the Ontario Agri-Food Innovation Alliance, helps to create new products and services for the growing agri-food sector.

Oluwatimileyin Abolarin holding a goat

U of G student discovers agriculture industry through goat reproduction research

Ontario’s goat sector is growing by leaps and bounds, and that’s where field research can be helpful. Agri-food researchers spend time in the field to become familiar with their topic of study. This allows them to learn what producers are facing as they work toward sustainable production.

Illustration entitled "Tackling Food Waste" which identifies 8 opportunities outlined below

Tackling Ontario’s $12-billion food waste problem

Ontario’s food system follows a linear model, meaning that our food waste has an end point and is not being repurposed as it would be in a circular economy. As a result, Ontario is saddled with a whopping $12 billion in food waste across the entire value chain, from farmers to retailers to households.

University of Guelph researchers are working to identify areas that will help the province reduce food waste’s economic impact.

Helping camelina catch on: This durable and versatile crop has potential for Ontario farmers

A so-called ancient oilseed called camelina is attracting attention in Ontario. Researchers believe it has potential as a superb cover crop here and are field testing it now in research plots in Simcoe, Winchester and Ridgetown.

Camelina, a member of the mustard plant family, originated in Europe. It was first identified in Canada in the mid-1800s. It’s realized significant growth in Western Canada over the past decade among producers who appreciate its winter hardiness and versatility.

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