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Skills for Research Impact - Event Planning and Facilitation

Getting your stakeholders into the room is important, but you also need to know what to do with them!

Build a checklist of event planning essentials and discuss best practices in group facilitation with Muriel O'Doherty from the Arrell Food Institute. The session is one of nine in the Skills for Research Impact monthly workshop series for faculty, research staff and graduate students interested in enhancing the impact of their research.

Researchers with Compression Moulder

Toward greater sustainability Bioengineering researchers are converting food waste into compostable packaging

Canada’s ever-growing population is accumulating food waste—currently, more than half of the food produced in Canada ends up in the garbage.

A research team at the University of Guelph is finding ways to convert food waste into compostable packaging through bioengineering.

Prof. Manjusri Misra, School of Engineering, and her research team are searching for ways to use non-food biomass and innovative production processes to create sustainable packaging.

Illustration entitled "Tackling Food Waste" which identifies 8 opportunities outlined below

Tackling Ontario’s $12-billion food waste problem

Ontario’s food system follows a linear model, meaning that our food waste has an end point and is not being repurposed as it would be in a circular economy. As a result, Ontario is saddled with a whopping $12 billion in food waste across the entire value chain, from farmers to retailers to households.

University of Guelph researchers are working to identify areas that will help the province reduce food waste’s economic impact.

Field of muck crops in rows

Marvellous muck: Muck soil’s loose particles let vegetables grow with ease

Hidden in plain sight—if that’s even possible, with Ontario’s bustling Highway 400 cutting through it—is one of North America’s most influential vegetable field research facilities, the Government of Ontario’s Bradford Muck Crops Research Station.

As field research stations go, it’s hidden because it’s relatively small. At just four acres, it’s about the size of four football fields.

In a field of yellow, a hand cradles the green shoots with buds on a camelina plant

Helping camelina catch on: This durable and versatile crop has potential for Ontario farmers

A so-called ancient oilseed called camelina is attracting attention in Ontario. Researchers believe it has potential as a superb cover crop here and are field testing it now in research plots in Simcoe, Winchester and Ridgetown.

Camelina, a member of the mustard plant family, originated in Europe. It was first identified in Canada in the mid-1800s. It’s realized significant growth in Western Canada over the past decade among producers who appreciate its winter hardiness and versatility.

Unique nutrient medium offers unparalleled support for apple tree growth.

Big plans for micropropagation

Efforts to replace agriculture and food imports with homegrown products are arising in even the most specialized market segments, such as micropropagated trees.

Micropropagation uses small parts of plants instead of stem or root cuttings, allowing more trees to be grown faster. This innovation is important—demand for apple root stocks and varieties is predicted to reach more than two million plants per year for at least the next decade.

A tractor travels across a dirt field

Soil: The Next Frontier

The relationship between agriculture and food is a natural one—at least for producers, who nurture it daily. But the agri-food connection is increasingly becoming a “eureka moment” for the public, too. People are waking up to the realization that agriculture precedes food, and that what they see on their plate comes from complex agri-food systems.

A line of dairy cows

It pays to be environmentally friendly: Carbon footprint-friendly dairy farming leads to a healthy planet…and a healthy bottom line

Being a carbon footprint-conscious dairy farmer improves the planet and farm profitability, say University of Guelph researchers. They’ve determined that environmental best practices, such as manure management, also improve producer profit margins.

Research associate Susantha Jayasundara and Prof. Claudia Wagner-Riddle, School of Environmental Sciences, collected production data from dairy farms across Ontario and classified them as having a high or low carbon footprint.

Three goats laying together on a bed of hay

What's happening to these kids? Three-year study aims to unravel why goat kid mortalities happen

To support the demand for goat products, University of Guelph researchers are involved in an intensive, three-year, Ontario-wide herd health and management study.

Prof. Cathy Bauman, Department of Population Medicine, and a team of researchers have surveyed or visited almost 60 goat farmers over the past 18 months to investigate mortalities and management practices among their herds.

The researchers are also wrapping up a project to conduct autopsies on all goat kids under four months of age that died on about half of the farms.