News

Temporary Enhanced Biosecurity Protocol

To assist in efforts to slow the rate of COVID-19 transmission in the University of Guelph community and across Ontario, the Office of Research is following the University's recommendations regarding travel, self-isolation and social distancing.

Updates to the temporary, enhanced biosecurity protocol are posted on our Biosecurity web page.

Advancing agri-food research and innovation: 2019-20 projects

Research funded by the Government of Ontario and supported by the Ontario Agri-Food Innovation Alliance (Alliance) solves real-world challenges and yields meaningful innovations that ensure the success of the province’s agri-food sector and that promote rural economic development throughout Ontario.

Bonnie Mallard and Lauri Wagter-Lesperance look at a petri dish

Building their best herd: HIR technology carries big benefits for dairy producers looking to naturally improve herd health and reduce veterinary treatment costs

Treating sick cows is never fun, for either the animal or the farmer. Just ask dairy producer Brad Hulshof. While he’s in the barn tending an animal, everything else he has to do around the farm takes a back seat. Plus, it’s costly—producers like Hulshof invest about $1,800 in life’s usual necessities (particularly feed) from the time a calf is born, up until the animal calves in turn and starts producing milk. Add the cost of extraordinary veterinary treatment to the mix, and that number can climb appreciably.

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Skills for Research Impact - Event Planning and Facilitation

Getting your stakeholders into the room is important, but you also need to know what to do with them!

Build a checklist of event planning essentials and discuss best practices in group facilitation with Muriel O'Doherty from the Arrell Food Institute. The session is one of nine in the Skills for Research Impact monthly workshop series for faculty, research staff and graduate students interested in enhancing the impact of their research.

Researchers with Compression Moulder

Toward greater sustainability Bioengineering researchers are converting food waste into compostable packaging

Canada’s ever-growing population is accumulating food waste—currently, more than half of the food produced in Canada ends up in the garbage.

A research team at the University of Guelph is finding ways to convert food waste into compostable packaging through bioengineering.

Prof. Manjusri Misra, School of Engineering, and her research team are searching for ways to use non-food biomass and innovative production processes to create sustainable packaging.

Illustration entitled "Tackling Food Waste" which identifies 8 opportunities outlined below

Tackling Ontario’s $12-billion food waste problem

Ontario’s food system follows a linear model, meaning that our food waste has an end point and is not being repurposed as it would be in a circular economy. As a result, Ontario is saddled with a whopping $12 billion in food waste across the entire value chain, from farmers to retailers to households.

University of Guelph researchers are working to identify areas that will help the province reduce food waste’s economic impact.

Field of muck crops in rows

Marvellous muck: Muck soil’s loose particles let vegetables grow with ease

Hidden in plain sight—if that’s even possible, with Ontario’s bustling Highway 400 cutting through it—is one of North America’s most influential vegetable field research facilities, the Government of Ontario’s Bradford Muck Crops Research Station.

As field research stations go, it’s hidden because it’s relatively small. At just four acres, it’s about the size of four football fields.