History: 4th Annual GTA Symposium on History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Science, Technology, and Medicine | College of Arts

History: 4th Annual GTA Symposium on History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Posted on Thursday, April 28th, 2011

Tara Abraham and Sofie Lachapelle are proud to announce that the University of Guelph is hosting the 4th Annual GTA Symposium on History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Science, Technology, and Medicine on Tuesday, May 3, 2011 from 10am to 4pm.T he symposium is an effort on the part of scholars in the GTA to foster opportunities for communication and to provide a forum for scholarly exchange, bringing together faculty and graduate students interested in a range of topics and approaches constitutive of HPS/STS.

This year's speakers will be: * Maya Goldenberg (University of Guelph): Trust in Science and the MMR Vaccine Controversy * Aryn Martin and Kelly Holloway (York University): 'Something there is that doesn't love a wall’: The elusive placental barrier in medical and popular discourse * Conor Burns (Ryerson University): "Giving form to Woodland chronology in American archaeology: A preliminary study * Alexandra Rutherford (York University): “Poor Risks for the Professions”: Alice Boring, Georgene Seward, and the 'Woman Problem' Revisited * Marga Vicedo (University of Toronto): Niko Tinbergen's work on autism: Interpreting gestures in gulls and children * Eric Desjardins (University of Western Ontario): Reflections on Unpredictability and Resilience Thinking in Ecological Management All are welcome! The symposium will be held in the Lecture Room of the Macdonald Stewart Art Centre, adjacent to the University of Guelph, from 10am to 4pm. A lunch will be provided. At the end of the day, participants are welcome to join us for food and drinks at The Albion Hotel located at 49 Norfolk Street in downtown Guelph. Get the flyer...

LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The University of Guelph resides on the land of the Between the Lakes Treaty No. 3, the territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit. This land is part of the Dish with One Spoon, a covenant between Indigenous nations to live peaceably on the territories of the Great Lakes region. We recognize that today this gathering place is home to many First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and acknowledging them reminds us of our collective responsibility to the land where we learn, live and work.