Final Examination for the Degree of MSc Food Science for Lydia Wang

Date and Time

Location

Food Science Department lecture room 128

Details

DEFENCE ANNOUNCEMENT Final Examination for the Degree of MSc 
 
LYDIA WANG

Examining Committee

Dr. Loong-Tak Lim, Chair

Dr. Benjamin Bohrer, Advisor

Dr. Ira Mandell, Advisory Committee Member 

Dr. Donald Mercer, Department Member 
 
TITLE: INVESTIGATION OF ALTERNATIVES TO IONOPHORE/ANTIBIOTIC MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES IN FINISHING CATTLE AND THE INHERENT EFFECT ON BEEF QUALITY AND SHELF LIFE 
 
ABSTRACT: 
The effects of feeding antibiotic supplements versus essential oils and(or) benzoic acid to finishing cattle were investigated for animal performance, carcass characteristics, meat quality and shelf life stability. Crossbred steers (n = 68; BW = 539 ± 36 kg) were placed into 3 blocks based on initial weight. Within each block, 1 of 5 dietary treatments were randomly assigned for a 98day feeding period: (1) control (CON) diet (no supplement); (2) monensin/tylosin (M/T) supplemented diet; (3) essential oil (EO) supplemented diet; (4) benzoic acid (BA) supplemented diet; and (5) a combination of essential oils and benzoic acid (COMBO) supplemented diet. Final weights, average daily gains, and dry matter intakes were similar (P > 0.12) among treatments. However, M/T steers had greater feed efficiency (P = 0.05) compared with steers fed CON, EO, and COMBO diets. Carcass characteristics and meat quality traits were comparable (P > 0.07) among dietary treatments. Trained panelists found CON and COMBO longissimus thoracis steaks to be tougher, chewier, and less juicy (P ≤ 0.01) than palatability traits for steaks from other dietary treatments. Objective colour and visual discoloration scores prior and after simulated retail display for M/T steaks and ground beef manufactured from semimembranosus muscles were not different (P > 0.05) to beef that came from EO or BA fed steers. Oxidative stability for beef products were not affected (P > 0.05) by dietary treatment. Overall, study results suggest there is potential in replacing ionophores/antibiotics with essential oils and(or) benzoic acid in beef cattle finishing diets. 

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