Religion and Society (HIST*2260) | College of Arts

Religion and Society (HIST*2260)

Code and section: HIST*2260*DE

Term: Fall 2019

Instructor: Ted Smith

Details

Course Synopsis:

This course surveys the major trends in religious beliefs and practices and their social impact since the Reformation. The focus of the course is on the British Isles and North America with some discussion of developments in Continental Europe.

By the end of this course, you should be able to:

  1. Describe the nature of religious belief and differentiate between religious tents and religion as a lived experience;
  2. Explain the development of social contexts and religious doctrines, as seen through the three main course themes of disintegration, church and state, and the other;
  3. Assess how religion is integrated into western societies, and those societies that have become dominated by the West, and articulate how religion impacts the daily lives of past and present North Americans; and
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of historical development by evaluating the strengths and limitations of the main course themes’ ability to delineate the complex nature of the relationship between religion and society.

Method of Evaluation and Weights:

 5%  Discussion 1
 5%  Discussion 2
10%  Essay Proposal
 5%  Discussion 3
 5%  Group Photo Essay Part I
 5%  Group Photo Essay Part II
 5%  Discussion 4
30%  Essay
25%  Final Exam

Required Texts:

There is no textbook required for this course.  You will be required to access course reserve materials through the University of Guelph McLaughlin Library.

Please note:  This is a preliminary web course description only.  The department reserves the right to change without notice any information in this description.  The final, binding course outline will be distributed in the first class of the semester.

LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The University of Guelph resides on the land of the Between the Lakes Treaty No. 3, the territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit. This land is part of the Dish with One Spoon, a covenant between Indigenous nations to live peaceably on the territories of the Great Lakes region. We recognize that today this gathering place is home to many First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and acknowledging them reminds us of our collective responsibility to the land where we learn, live and work.