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History: PhD Student Ann Vermeyden Featured in Guelph Mercury

 

Belly dance is an art form celebrated and practised among many cultures and regions of the world — including Canada, new research shows. University of Guelph history PhD student Anne Vermeyden, a dancer herself, is investigating the rich but largely unwritten past of belly dance in Toronto, and why it has flourished there. So far, most research on belly dance history in North America has been largely focused on the United States. Vermeyden says the art form's presence in Canada should be recognized, too. ...

read the rest of the story at the Guelph Mercury

PhD Student Anne Vermeyden Featured in Guelph Mercury

 

Belly dance is an art form celebrated and practised among many cultures and regions of the world — including Canada, new research shows. University of Guelph history PhD student Anne Vermeyden, a dancer herself, is investigating the rich but largely unwritten past of belly dance in Toronto, and why it has flourished there. So far, most research on belly dance history in North America has been largely focused on the United States. Vermeyden says the art form's presence in Canada should be recognized, too. ...

read the rest of the story at the Guelph Mercury

Philosophy: Brian Wetstein

With sadness we report the sudden passing of our colleague, Professor Brian Wetstein, on June 5, 2015. Brian had faced health challenges for some time and retired from the University in 2014.

Brian completed his PhD work in Philosophy (“The Role of Dialectic in Nietzsche’s Thought”) in 1994 at the University of Guelph, and had taught as a Lecturer at both UG and Guelph–Humber since that time. He was appointed as Assistant Professor in 2003.

Brian Wetstein

With sadness we report the sudden passing of our colleague, Professor Brian Wetstein, on June 5, 2015. Brian had faced health challenges for some time and retired from the University in 2014.

Brian completed his PhD work in Philosophy (“The Role of Dialectic in Nietzsche’s Thought”) in 1994 at the University of Guelph, and had taught as a Lecturer at both UG and Guelph–Humber since that time. He was appointed as Assistant Professor in 2003.

History: Sarah Shropshire Wins C.H.A. Article Prize

 

PhD candidate Sarah Shropshire's article "What’s a Guy To Do?: Contraceptive Responsibility, Confronting Masculinity, and the History of Vasectomy in Canada" has recently been awarded the Canadian Historical Association's Jean-Marie Fecteau Prize for the best article published in a peer-reviewed journal by a PhD or MA-level student. In exploring the history of vasectomy, Sarah's article consciously challenges the gendered paradigm that scholars have applied to the history of contraception while also discussing how evolving surgical techniques and social constructions of masculinity have affected the popularity of the procedure. Sarah's article appeared last year in the Canadian Bulletin of Medical History.

Congratulations from all of us!

Sarah Shropshire Wins C.H.A. Article Prize

 

PhD candidate Sarah Shropshire's article "What’s a Guy To Do?: Contraceptive Responsibility, Confronting Masculinity, and the History of Vasectomy in Canada" has recently been awarded the Canadian Historical Association's Jean-Marie Fecteau Prize for the best article published in a peer-reviewed journal by a PhD or MA-level student. In exploring the history of vasectomy, Sarah's article consciously challenges the gendered paradigm that scholars have applied to the history of contraception while also discussing how evolving surgical techniques and social constructions of masculinity have affected the popularity of the procedure. Sarah's article appeared last year in the Canadian Bulletin of Medical History.

Congratulations from all of us!

History: Steven Rai Wins J. W. Skinner Medal

This year's winner of the J. W. Skinner Medal is recent graduate Steven Rai. The medal is the most prestigious University Convocation award for an undergraduate student at the University of Guelph and is awarded by the College of Social and Applied Human Sciences to a student for exceptional achievement in both academic and extracurricular activities.

Steven is an International Development major who has taken many courses with the Department. He is also familiar to the History Department through his fine work on the 1861 Census Project and the People in Motion research team, supervised by Drs. Kris Inwood and J. Andrew Ross. Congratulations from all of us!

Steven Rai Wins J. W. Skinner Medal

This year's winner of the J. W. Skinner Medal is recent graduate Steven Rai. The medal is the most prestigious University Convocation award for an undergraduate student at the University of Guelph and is awarded by the College of Social and Applied Human Sciences to a student for exceptional achievement in both academic and extracurricular activities.

Steven is an International Development major who has taken many courses with the Department. He is also familiar to the History Department through his fine work on the 1861 Census Project and the People in Motion research team, supervised by Drs. Kris Inwood and J. Andrew Ross. Congratulations from all of us!

History: Farewell to Dr. Andrew Ross

 

We recently received the excellent news that Dr. Andrew Ross, who has served as a postdoctoral fellow in our Department for many years, has accepted a job with Disposition and Discoverability Task Force at Library and Archives Canada. We all congratulate Andrew and wish him well at his new appointment in Ottawa.

Andrew, we will miss you!

 

LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The University of Guelph resides on the land of the Between the Lakes Treaty No. 3, the territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit. This land is part of the Dish with One Spoon, a covenant between Indigenous nations to live peaceably on the territories of the Great Lakes region. We recognize that today this gathering place is home to many First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and acknowledging them reminds us of our collective responsibility to the land where we learn, live and work.