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History: Steven Rai Wins J. W. Skinner Medal

This year's winner of the J. W. Skinner Medal is recent graduate Steven Rai. The medal is the most prestigious University Convocation award for an undergraduate student at the University of Guelph and is awarded by the College of Social and Applied Human Sciences to a student for exceptional achievement in both academic and extracurricular activities.

Steven is an International Development major who has taken many courses with the Department. He is also familiar to the History Department through his fine work on the 1861 Census Project and the People in Motion research team, supervised by Drs. Kris Inwood and J. Andrew Ross. Congratulations from all of us!

Steven Rai Wins J. W. Skinner Medal

This year's winner of the J. W. Skinner Medal is recent graduate Steven Rai. The medal is the most prestigious University Convocation award for an undergraduate student at the University of Guelph and is awarded by the College of Social and Applied Human Sciences to a student for exceptional achievement in both academic and extracurricular activities.

Steven is an International Development major who has taken many courses with the Department. He is also familiar to the History Department through his fine work on the 1861 Census Project and the People in Motion research team, supervised by Drs. Kris Inwood and J. Andrew Ross. Congratulations from all of us!

History: Farewell to Dr. Andrew Ross

 

We recently received the excellent news that Dr. Andrew Ross, who has served as a postdoctoral fellow in our Department for many years, has accepted a job with Disposition and Discoverability Task Force at Library and Archives Canada. We all congratulate Andrew and wish him well at his new appointment in Ottawa.

Andrew, we will miss you!

 

Farewell to Dr. Andrew Ross

 

We recently received the excellent news that Dr. Andrew Ross, who has served as a postdoctoral fellow in our Department for many years, has accepted a job with Disposition and Discoverability Task Force at Library and Archives Canada. We all congratulate Andrew and wish him well at his new appointment in Ottawa.

Andrew, we will miss you!

 

History: Artifacts in Agraria Symposium - Rural History at Guelph

Rural History at Guelph is proud to host the Artifacts in Agraria Symposium October 17 and 18, sponsored by the Francis and Ruth Redelmeier Professorship in Rural History.

Join historians, archaeologists, sociologists and museum professionals from across North America as they explore the material artifacts of everyday life. Observe how these historical sources gather meaning when understood in the context of surviving written records, family history and international commerce. Join the discussion on how artifacts reflect aesthetic and cultural beliefs, symbolize self-identity, affirm values, tell stories, purvey heritage and change meaning over time. Celebrate the new methods and ways of viewing artifacts that deepen our understanding of rural life.

Admission is free when you register before August 3rd, contact Jodey Nurse - jnurse@uoguelph.ca
For more information contact Dr. Catharine Wilson - cawilson@uoguelph.ca or visit Rural History

Get the final schedule .pdf        Get the poster .pdf

Artifacts in Agraria Symposium - Rural History at Guelph

Rural History at Guelph is proud to host the Artifacts in Agraria Symposium October 17 and 18, sponsored by the Francis and Ruth Redelmeier Professorship in Rural History.

Join historians, archaeologists, sociologists and museum professionals from across North America as they explore the material artifacts of everyday life. Observe how these historical sources gather meaning when understood in the context of surviving written records, family history and international commerce. Join the discussion on how artifacts reflect aesthetic and cultural beliefs, symbolize self-identity, affirm values, tell stories, purvey heritage and change meaning over time. Celebrate the new methods and ways of viewing artifacts that deepen our understanding of rural life.

Admission is free when you register before August 3rd, contact Jodey Nurse - jnurse@uoguelph.ca
For more information contact Dr. Catharine Wilson - cawilson@uoguelph.ca or visit Rural History

Get the final schedule .pdf        Get the poster .pdf

History: Susan Nance's Historical Elephants featured on Research Matters blog

This week, Dr. Susan Nance's research on historical circus elephants is featured on the Research Matters blog, sponsored by the Council of Ontario Universities.

After more than a century of parading in pink tutus with dogs balancing on their backs, elephants in the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey’s circus are preparing to take their final bow. By 2018, the star performers will retire from the spotlight to live out their lives in an elephant conservation centre. 

These days, fewer and fewer circuses use elephants and their stage exit mirrors the public’s increased empathy toward these animals. But studying their heyday as performers reveals important insights about their audience, in other words, about us as consumer of entertainment. 

Enter Susan Nance, an associate professor of U.S. history at the University of Guelph whose research concentrates on entertainment, from vaudeville to street performers. Her interest in circus elephants was piqued after she uncovered “shocking things that circus historians don’t like to talk about,” says Nance, who set out to change the way historians look at animals. ... read the rest of the blog

Susan Nance's Historical Elephants featured on Research Matters blog

This week, Dr. Susan Nance's research on historical circus elephants is featured on the Research Matters blog, sponsored by the Council of Ontario Universities.

After more than a century of parading in pink tutus with dogs balancing on their backs, elephants in the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey’s circus are preparing to take their final bow. By 2018, the star performers will retire from the spotlight to live out their lives in an elephant conservation centre. 

These days, fewer and fewer circuses use elephants and their stage exit mirrors the public’s increased empathy toward these animals. But studying their heyday as performers reveals important insights about their audience, in other words, about us as consumer of entertainment. 

Enter Susan Nance, an associate professor of U.S. history at the University of Guelph whose research concentrates on entertainment, from vaudeville to street performers. Her interest in circus elephants was piqued after she uncovered “shocking things that circus historians don’t like to talk about,” says Nance, who set out to change the way historians look at animals. ... read the rest of the blog

LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The University of Guelph resides on the land of the Between the Lakes Treaty No. 3, the territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit. This land is part of the Dish with One Spoon, a covenant between Indigenous nations to live peaceably on the territories of the Great Lakes region. We recognize that today this gathering place is home to many First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and acknowledging them reminds us of our collective responsibility to the land where we learn, live and work.