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Philosophy: Dr David Brewster

One of our earliest alumni, Dr David Brewster, went into medical school after completing his Philosophy BA. He has spent his medical career helping impoverished children in many countries and is currently training pediatricians in East Timor.  He's profiled in this summer's Arts Alumni newsletter (page 4).

Dr David Brewster

One of our earliest alumni, Dr David Brewster, went into medical school after completing his Philosophy BA. He has spent his medical career helping impoverished children in many countries and is currently training pediatricians in East Timor.  He's profiled in this summer's Arts Alumni newsletter (page 4).

Philosophy: Kyle Bromhall wins prize

Kyle Bromhall, now in our PhD program, has won the William James Prize for his paper "Is there more to rationality than its sentiment?" which he will give at this December's annual meeting of the American Philosophical Association.  Congratulations Kyle!

 

Kyle Bromhall wins prize

Kyle Bromhall, now in our PhD program, has won the William James Prize for his paper "Is there more to rationality than its sentiment?" which he will give at this December's annual meeting of the American Philosophical Association.  Congratulations Kyle!

 

History: Post-Doc Cathryn Spence on Married Women in Medieval Scottish Courts

Cathryn SpenceHistory post-doc Cathryn Spence has been studying the Scottish burgh records (essentially town records) from 1560 to the mid-1600s with a focus on court cases involving debt and credit. She found that about one-third of the cases involved married women, sometimes with their husbands, but sometimes on their own. “I think that shows us that at any time in history, people’s lives are not as cut and dried as the laws might suggest,” says Spence. “Life is a bit more complicated.”
read the rest of the story @guelph

Post-Doc Cathryn Spence on Married Women in Medieval Scottish Courts

Cathryn SpenceHistory post-doc Cathryn Spence has been studying the Scottish burgh records (essentially town records) from 1560 to the mid-1600s with a focus on court cases involving debt and credit. She found that about one-third of the cases involved married women, sometimes with their husbands, but sometimes on their own. “I think that shows us that at any time in history, people’s lives are not as cut and dried as the laws might suggest,” says Spence. “Life is a bit more complicated.”
read the rest of the story @guelph

Stuart McCook on Canada AM

stuart McCook

"Coffee-Leaf Rust"is cuasing huge problems for coffee producers in Latin America.Stuart McCook, University of Guelph, Explains what it is.

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LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The University of Guelph resides on the land of the Between the Lakes Treaty No. 3, the territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit. This land is part of the Dish with One Spoon, a covenant between Indigenous nations to live peaceably on the territories of the Great Lakes region. We recognize that today this gathering place is home to many First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and acknowledging them reminds us of our collective responsibility to the land where we learn, live and work.