Collaborative Specialization in Neuroscience - MSc/MBS/PhD

The Collaborative Specialization in Neuroscience provides a specialization for Master’s and PhD students engaged in research in the rapidly expanding field of neuroscience, by permitting students to combine their departmental degree program with multidisciplinary exposure to the field of neuroscience. This unique combination of multidisciplinary studies provides students with the best possible foundation for academic careers in neuroscience and related areas. The spcialization includes participation from core faculty in the following departments: Animal Biosciences, Biomedical Science, Clinical Studies, Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, Integrative Biology, Molecular and Cellular Biology, Pathobiology, Population Medicine, and Psychology.

Administrative Staff

Dr. Boyer Winters, Director
Psychology, MCKN Rm 3005, Ext. 52163
bwinters@uoguelph.ca

Peter Hausdorf
Psychology, MCKN Rm 3013, Ext. 53976
phausdor@uoguelph.ca

Graduate Program Assistant
Robin Sorbara
Psychology, MCKNEXT Rm 4014, Ext. 53508
robinfra@uoguelph.ca

Academic Advisor and Manager
Sharon Helder
Psychology, MCKNEXT Rm 4015, Ext. 53260
shelder@uoguelph.ca

 

Graduate Faculty

Naseem Al-Aidroos
Assistant Professor, Psychology

Craig D. Bailey
Assistant Professor, Biomedical Sciences

Andrew J. Bendall
Associate Professor, Molecular and Cellular Biology

Leah R. Bent
Associate Professor, Human Health and Nutritional Sciences

Nicholas J. Bernier
Professor, Integrative Biology

Elena Choleris
Professor, Psychology

Mark J. Fenske
Associate Professor, Psychology

Chris Fiacconi
Assistant Professor, Psychology

George Harauz
Professor and Canada Research Chair, Molecular and Cellular Biology

Andreas Heyland
Associate Professor, Integrative Biology

Fiona James
Assistant Professor, Clinical Studies

Nina Jones
Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair, Molecular and Cellular Biology

Bettina E. Kalisch
Associate Professor, Biomedical Sciences

Frederic Laberge
Associate Professor, Integrative Biology

Jasmin Lalonde
Assistant Professor, Molecular and Cell Biology

Francesco Leri
Professor, Psychology

Ray Lu
Associate Professor, Molecular and Cellular Biology

David W.L. Ma
Associate Professor, Human Health and Nutritional Sciences

Neil J. MacLusky
Professor, Biomedical Sciences

Georgia Mason
Professor and Canada Research Chair, Animal Biosciences

Robert L. McLaughlin
Associate Professor, Integrative Biology

Daniel V. Meegan
Associate Professor, Psychology

Amy Newman
Assistant Professor, Integrative Biology

Lee Niel
Assistant Professor, Population Medicine

Linda A. Parker
Professor and Canada Research Chair, Psychology

Melissa Perrault
Assistant Professor, Molecular and Cell Biololgy

Geoff Power
Assistant Professor, Human Health and Nutritional Sciences

Tarek Saleh
Professor, Biomedical Sciences

John Z. Srbely
Assistant Professor, Human Health and Nutritional Sciences

Lana M. Trick
Associate Professor, Psychology

Patricia V. Turner
Professor, Pathobiology

Lori A. Vallis
Associate Professor, Human Health and Nutritional Sciences

Terry Van Raay
Assistant Professor, Molecular and Cellular Biology

Tina Widowski
Professor, Animal Biosciences

Boyer D. Winters
Associate Professor, Psychology

John L. Zettel
Assistant Professor, Human Health and Nutritional Sciences

As a practical matter, however, any faculty member who is approved by the Board of Graduate Studies for graduate faculty status and is a member of a participating unit within the collaborative specialization will be able to advise a masters or doctoral student.

 

Master’s Program (MSc or MBS)

The Collaborative MSc or MBS (Master of Biomedical Science) Specialization in Neuroscience enables students engaged in neuroscience Master’s thesis research to combine their departmental degree program with a multidisciplinary specialization in the field of neuroscience.

Admission Requirements

Master’s students in the Collaborative Specialization in Neuroscience must meet the admission requirements of the participating department in which they are enrolled. The application process has two stages: first, application to the primary program of interest, identifying interest in the Collaborative specialization as a secondary focus. If the student is admitted to the primary program, the second stage is then admission to the Collaborative Specialization. Students may add the Collaborative Specialization at any time during their degree, as long as they complete the program requirements via a “Study Option or Degree Program Transfer” form with the graduate secretary in their home department.

Degree Requirements

In addition to coursework in their respective departments, students in the Master’s program must complete NEUR*6000: Principles of Neuroscience (0.5 credits), as well as registering for NEUR*6100: Seminar in Neuroscience (0.0 credits) every Fall and Winter semester that they are in the program. In NEUR*6100, students and faculty will meet once a month to discuss issues/ hear talks/ present research in neuroscience. Note that students registered in the Collaborative Neuroscience Specialization cannot use NEUR*6000 as an elective to satisfy the requirements of their home department program.

Please note that NEUR*6100 is a two-semester commitment, and students must register for the course twice each year: once in the Fall and once in the Winter. Students who do not register for both terms will have incomplete coursework on their transcript, and will be unable to complete the Master’s program until it is resolved.

 

PhD Program

The Collaborative PhD Specialization in Neuroscience enables students engaged in neuroscience dissertation research to combine their departmental degree program with a multidisciplinary specialization in the field of neuroscience.

Admission Requirements

PhD students in the Collaborative Specialization in Neuroscience must meet the PhD admission requirements for the participating department in which they are enrolled. Students may add the Collaborative Specialization at any time during their degree, as long as they complete the program requirements via a “Study Option or Degree Program Transfer” form with the graduate secretary in their home department.

Degree Requirements

If a student enters the Collaborative PhD Specialization in Neuroscience at the doctoral level, in addition to coursework in their respective departments, students must complete NEUR*6000: Principles of Neuroscience, or show evidence of course equivalence in prior training. Note that students registered in the Collaborative Neuroscience Specialization cannot use NEUR*6000 as an elective to satisfy the requirements of their home department program. Students must be engaged in neuroscience dissertation research. Doctoral students must also enroll in NEUR*6100: Seminar in Neuroscience (0.0 credit) every Fall and Winter semester that they are in the program. Failing to register for both the Fall and Winter semesters every year could delay graduation. The seminar will meet monthly. Students must take their qualifying exams within five semesters of entering the program, as required by University graduate policies. One member on the qualifying exam committee must be a core member of the Collaborative specialization in Neuroscience outside the student’s home department or a faculty member from another university approved by graduate studies. Furthermore, one member of the student’s advisory committee must be a core member of the neuroscience collaborative specialization outside the student’s home department or a faculty member from another university approved by graduate studies.

Courses

NEUR*6000 Principles of Neuroscience

NEUR*6100 Seminar in Neuroscience