Research Areas by Faculty

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Our department houses some of the top researchers in the their field. There are many opportunities for students to get involved in research. Use the Search below to browse research areas by Faculty

My research is focused on trust in the workplace. 

I study the development of trust and the impact that trust has on both employees and organizations.  I examine trust from multiple perspectives: trust in supervisors, trust in subordinates and trust in peers as well as trust in teams.

My current research program investigates the importance of feeling trusted at work.  My goal is to identify and explain the factors that contribute to employees feeling trusted at work, and how this feeling of being trusted leads to improved job performance and employee well-being.

I founded the Guelph Organizational Trust (GOT) lab to answer these critical research questions. GOT Lab is an active research lab that provides rigorous training in a positive supportive environment for undergraduate and graduate students. 

Research Areas: Industrial-Organizational, trust, workplace attitudes

POSITION: 

Associate Professor

Research Director of the Occupational Health and Positive Psychology Lab (OHPP LAB)

 

RESEARCH INTERESTS: 

My research involves the disciplines of occupational health psychology and positive organizational psychology and focuses on stress, work–life issues, victimization, incivility and civility, and positive organizational interventions to enhance well-being and performance.

My research, has been published in outlets such as Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, Work & Stress and Journal of Organizational Behavior.

I serve on the editorial boards of Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, Stress & Health, Anxiety, Stress & Coping and Occupational Health Science.

 

Follow me on Twitter: @worklifediary

 

Research Areas: feminist psychology, health and well-being, Industrial-Organizational, positive psychology, work-life balance
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: No

Currently, I am interested in the statistical issues related to the replication crisis in psychology. I believe that R is the future of data analysis in psychology and I am also a strong advocate of reproducible research (i.e., creating a reproducible process for generating the numbers in your paper). More genearally, my research interests include teamwork, organizational commitment, and the role of emotions in the workplace.

Research Areas: groups and teams, Industrial-Organizational, quantitative methods, replication crisis, workplace attitudes
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: No

I use behavioural measures, eye tracking, EEG/ERP and fMRI to study visual attention, perception, and memory. If you are interested in joining the lab, or want to learn more about the research I do, please see the website for my research lab (linked above).

Prospecitve graduate students: We are looking for bright, enthusiastic graduate students to join the lab in Fall 2018. If you are interested, you should apply to the NACS graduate program offered by our department.

Prospective undergraduate students: Please see instructions on my lab website about how to "Join the Lab", and options for completing experiential learning oppotunities.

Research Areas: attention, learning and memory, Neuroscience and Applied Cognitive Sciences, perception, vision
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

My research focuses on the assessment of attachment-related emotional, cognitive and social interactive processes in childhood and adulthood, and the impact of childhood maltreatment on subsequent social and emotional functioning.  I am interested in how a parent’s history of childhood maltreatment affects parenting behaviour, the parent-child relationship, and the child’s subsequent emotional development. I am particularly interested in developing and improving assessment measures related to these topics, such as parental sensitivity, parental disrupted caregiving, parental socialization of children's emotions, children's representations of attachment, and youth self-compassion versus self-criticism.

Attachment; parental trauma history and symptoms; parent-child relational processes; socio-emotional development; assessment

Research Areas: attachment, Clinical Psychology: Applied Developmental Emphasis, emotion, maltreatment, parent-child relationships

My research deals with the psychosocial determinants that influence women’s health and wellbeing. In particular, I am interested in how women are broadly impacted by sexual and physical violence, and what we can do to ameliorate that violence.  Currently, I am working on projects dealing with the evaluation and implementation of a sexual assault prevention program, housing discrimination against battered women, and the evaluation of a program for children who have witnessed intimate partner violence.  I have also done work on the incorporation of HPV technologies into cervical cancer prevention.

Research Areas: aggression / conflict / violence, Applied Social, feminist psychology, health and well-being, justice
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

Pat Barclay is an evolutionary psychologist whose research combines the fields of evolutionary biology, animal behaviour, social psychology, mathematical game theory, and experimental economics to study topics such as: cooperation, altruism, reputation, punishment, friendship, partner choice, trust, biological markets, costly signaling, and risk-taking.

Research Areas: Applied Social, decision making, evolution, groups and teams, risk-taking, social behavior, trust
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

The lab is now Full for F16 and W17. I may still accept a few students for S17 and F17.
Research in the lab involves investigations into the neurotransmitters and hormonal underpinnings of social and cognitive behavior in rodents.

Research Areas: animal, behavioral pharmacology, learning and memory, neuroscience of behavior, social neuroscience
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

Colour categorization, cognitive science and its foundations, culture and cognition, the evolution of culture, experimental philosophy.

Please note that Dr. Desmarais will not be accepting honours thesis or graduate students in 2016-17 as he will be on leave.

Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: No

Mark Fenske, PhD, is a cognitive-neuroscientist and Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Guelph. His research combines neuroimaging techniques with studies of human behaviour to examine factors that are critical for healthy cognitive and emotional functioning. His writing, teaching, and public speaking are likewise aimed at helping others understand that learning a bit about the brain can be helpful in enhancing performance and well-being. Dr. Fenske's efforts to translate scientific findings and make them accessible to the public at large includes the bestselling book, 'The Winner's Brain: 8 Strategies Great Minds Use to Achieve Success' and his popular 'Better Brain' column, which regularly appeared in the Globe & Mail.

Cognition-emotion interactions, self-regulation, object and face recognition, neuroimaging

 

 

Research Areas: attention, emotion, learning and memory, motivation, Neuroscience and Applied Cognitive Sciences
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

Broadly speaking, I conduct research that aims to further our understanding of the role of socio-cultural influences on human motivation and behavior, particularly in the contexts of health-related behaviors, immigration and biculturalism, as well as social conflicts.

For the most part, my research examines: (a) some of the cognitive processes through which individuals derive identities and norms from socio-cultural groups, (b) the impact of group membership on human motivation, particularly with regards to the acquisition and maintenance of undesired behaviors and involvement in intergroup conflicts, and (c) approaches to change group processes that foster social dysfunction.

These interests have led to projects illustrating the powerful influence of socio-cultural groups on a range of behaviors (e.g., binge drinking, addictive-impulsive behaviours, physical activity, procrastination, political demonstration) and on psychological well-being (e.g., self-esteem, life satisfaction, social anxiety).

Some of my current work examines: (a) the impact on self-regulation of aversive social emotions (e.g., guilt, pride) stemming from the transgression of social norms, (b) the influence of social outcomes on undesired behaviors, particularly those pertaining to social affiliation and exclusion and (c) norm based interventions, such as social marketing campaigns, to change group processes that hamper health.

Research Areas: Applied Social, cross-cultural psychology, groups and teams, health and well-being, motivation
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: No

There are many research topics in Industrial/Organizational Psychology that interest me, which is why I am flexible with respect to the topics my graduate students can explore. Having said that I currently have several research directions that I am very excited about and would ideally integrate with my graduate student research. 

The first involves the development of theory to understand job/task performance (e.g. see Borman, White, Pulakos & Oppler, 1991). In specific terms, how do ability, personality, attitudes, experience and behaviour come together to explain performance? In Industrial Psychology, a core issue is the development of assessment tools to predict future job performance of job applicants. Despite this focus little theory has been developed to understand and explicate the relationship between these tools and job performance. I am currently implementing research studies in lab and field settings to develop a deeper understanding of these relationships. 

A second focus of my research is on developing our understanding of the research-practice gap in I/O Psychology. As a researcher-practitioner it is has been my experience that there is not enough communication or collaboration between the researchers and practitioners in our field. To date, we have only explored one aspect of this, which was the application of self-categorization theory (see Turner & Oakes, 1989) to explain this gap. I hope to apply other group behaviour theories to this area in the future. 

The third area of research explores succession management practices in organizations and the impact of these programs on manager attitudes and organizational outcomes. Our first study in this area focused on the components of succession management programs and manager perceptions of organizational justice (see Slan-Jerusalim & Hausdorf, 2007). This was followed up with a study assessing the relationship between elements of succession management programs and manager turnover as mediated by manager attitudes. This longitudinal study is currently being prepared for journal submission. The practices that companies use for succession management are critical to ensure that managers remain with their organizations and have an opportunity to develop their skills. I hope to explore these programs from individual learning and development perspectives in the future (e.g. how do managers learn and develop at work through these programs?). 

A fourth area of research focuses on understanding adverse impact produced by the use of cognitive ability tests in selection. Specifically we have been exploring the role of immigrant variables (e.g. English as a second language, years of education inside/outside of Canada, and generational status). Also, we have been exploring the use of fixed bands with minority preference hiring as a solution to adverse impact in selection.

My graduate students are working on a diverse range of projects from police officer coping responses to traumatic events experienced at work, the effect of social sharing in response to observed employee incivility, and the impact of high potential identification on leader behaviours.

I value open discussions, mutual respect, critical thinking and hard work. I consider my graduate students to be full research partners and the majority of my research is published in collaboration with them. As a senior member of the I/O Area, I plan to continue involving graduate students in the development of ideas and implementation of my research.

Research Areas: Industrial-Organizational

Francesco Leri is a full Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Guelph.

His general area of expertise is Behavioural Pharmacology and Neuroscience.  Dr. Leri investigates psychological and neuropharmacological mechanisms involved in the development, persistence and recurrence of behaviours reinforced by chemical (cocaine, heroin, oxycodone) and natural (monosaccharaides and disaccharides) rewards.  Through psychological (i.e., conditioning), pharmacological and neurobiological experimentations in laboratory animals, his studies have been providing basic scientific knowledge critical to the understanding of hedonic processes, reinforcement monarchisms, as well as addictions and their long-term treatments.

Current projects are: 1) neuropharmacology of reinforcing stimuli (funded by Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada); 2) food addiction: studies of bio-behavioral links between nutrition and obesity (funded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research); and 3) biomarkers of hedonic responses (pre-clinical project of the Canadian Biomarker Integration Network in Depression funded by the Ontario Brain Institute).  

Dr. Leri is actively involved in undergraduate and graduate teaching and research supervision, and he is currently serving as Chair of the Department of Psychology.

 

Research Areas: addiction, behavioral pharmacology, learning and memory, Neuroscience and Applied Cognitive Sciences, neuroscience of behavior
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

My research program examines non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and related mental health difficulties among youth and emerging adults. Central to my research approach is the use of the Internet as a research platform and outreach tool. In this regard, my research investigates: a) online NSSI communication, b) ways to increase youth’s access to online NSSI resources, c) NSSI recovery experiences, and d) ways to enhance knowledge and training of those who can support youth who struggle with NSSI and other mental health difficulties. 

Research Areas: adolescent, Clinical Psychology: Applied Developmental Emphasis, research-practice, resilience and identity, science & technology, self-injury
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: No

Positive Clinical Psychology, Youth Strengths & Resilience, Child/Adolescent Depression, Childhood Maltreatment, Cognitive Schemas

Research Areas: adolescent, Clinical Psychology: Applied Developmental Emphasis, health and well-being, positive psychology, resilience and identity

My long-standing research interests fall in the general area of the expeerimental study of human cognition. The topics that I have studied include: mechanisms of attention; encoding and retrieval in memory; word recognition processes in skilled reading; risky decision-making among gamblers; and, social cognition. Current projects investigated with undergraduate honours students focus on repeition effects on memory and the interplay of visual and verbal processes in face recognition.

Memory, Language, Gambling, Social Cognition

Research Areas: learning and memory
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

Meghan McMurtry is an Assistant Professor in the CPA-accredited Clinical Psychology program at the University of Guelph, director of the Pediatric Pain, Health, and Communication Lab. She is a Clinical and Health Psychologist with the Pediatric Chronic Pain Program at McMaster Children's Hospital, an Adjunct Research Professor in Paediatrics at Western University, and an Associate Scientist at the Children's Health Research Institute. Her research and clinical interests in child health psychology focus on acute and chronic pain, medical procedure-related fear, as well as communication and family influences in these contexts.

Her research has been funded by the the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Canadian Foundation for Innovation, Team for Research with Adolescents and Children in Palliation and Grief, and the Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation.

Pediatric Chronic Pain Program
McMaster Children's Hospital

Associate Scientist
Children's Health Research Institute 

Adjunct Independent Researcher
Department of Paediatrics
Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry
Western University

Pediatric psychology, pediatric procedural pain and fear, parent-child interactions, chronic pain, family influences on children's pain, evidence-based treatment of pediatric procedural pain and needle fear, and training in health.

Research Areas: Clinical Psychology: Applied Developmental Emphasis, health and well-being, pain, parent-child relationships, pediatrics/medicine
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

Applied Cognition

I have broad interests in pediatric health psychology (e.g., obesity prevention, eating disorders, stress and coping in children) but my primary area of research focuses on understanding the factors that lead to injuries (e.g., attitudes and beliefs, personality attributes, social-situational context) and developing evidence-based programs to target these determinants and prevent injuries to children and adolescents. I work closely with community organizations who share these goals and can implement these prevention programs on a large scale.  For more information about my research visit my lab website.

Research Areas: Clinical Psychology: Applied Developmental Emphasis, health and well-being, intervention, pediatrics/medicine, risk-taking
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

I am a signatory of the Openness Initiative (https://opennessinitiative.org/).

In the Daydreaming Lab, we are creating new methods to measure daydream content, frequency, duration, meta-awareness (i.e., awareness that one is daydreaming), and attitudes toward daydreaming.

Data Analysis: We focus on extensive data exploration, optimal methods for the estimation of parameters, effect size estimation, and confidence intervals. We do not engage in the Null Hypothesis Significance Testing Process (NHSTP).

Our lab follows open science practices.

Research Areas: theoretical psychology
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

My research involves qualitative and theoretical methods applied to social issues. I focus mainly on social aspects of health, and ethical implications of science and technology. I also have a strong interest in public deliberation as a method for involving broader publics in research. I am also particularly interested in developing qualitative methods in psychology, across a range of topics.

Community engagement & public deliberation; social & ethical implications of genetics/genomics; qualitative methods; discourse analysis; risk & uncertainty; human agency.

Research Areas: Applied Social, health and well-being, qualitative methods, science & technology, theoretical psychology
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

Professor and Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Behavioural Neuroscience

Psychopharmacology, Taste aversion learning, Behavioural Neuroscience, Addiction, Cannabinoids

Our program of research cuts across the traditional boundaries of psychology, pharmacology, and neurobiology to understand processes of learning, emotion, sickness and addiction. The research is leading to a better understanding of basic neural processes involved in the modulation of the pharmacological properties of drugs, with specific applications to controlling nausea and vomiting in humans. We are currently investigating chemicals found naturally in the human body that mimic those in marijuana. These "endogenous cannabinoids," discovered in the 1990s, play a role not only in controlling nausea and vomiting, but also in learning, memory, protection against stroke and cancer, appetite, reward and addiction.

Research Areas: Neuroscience and Applied Cognitive Sciences
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

My current research focuses mainly on personnel selection, with an emphasis on finding valid and fair methods of hiring the best employees. Most recently, I have investigated two factors that affect interview performance: interview anxiety, which  negatively affects interview performance, and impression managment (honest and deceptive), which tends to increase interview performance.  

Research Areas: anxiety, employment interview, employment selection, Industrial-Organizational, job performance
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

My research interests lie broadly within the area of cross-cultural psychology. To date, my work has primarily examined a wide range of factors that could help to understand adaptation processes of immigrants and international students, including studying resilience, acculturation strategies, and ethnic and national identity. I have a commitment both to the theoretical and the applied aspects of cross-cultural psychology. An essential characteristic of my research activities, as a cross-cultural psychologist, is that studies are conducted across cultures or across different ethnic groups within a culture. 

Further information about my research and graduate students please see Centre for Cross-Cultural Research website.

Research Areas: cross-cultural psychology
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: No

My research focuses on social justice issues. In general, I am interested in the disparities or inequalities that exist between individuals and groups in terms of status, power, and outcomes (e.g., income) in the workplace.  I am a scholar in the Successful Societies Program of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. My work with the Successful Societies program has led me to develop an interdisciplinary perspective on issues of inequality.

I am investigating how the degree to which people experience of inequality at work (e.g., in pay, status, decision-making power) affects their well-being, performance, and health.  I am really intrigued by the processes through which too much inequality might hurt people, groups, and organizations.  Negative effects likely operate through stress processes and social relations (e.g., increased competition, decreased trust). Thus, I am studying how inequality negatively affects people within organizations.

I have long-term interests in who is more (vs. less) likely to want to maintain and promote inequality. A lot of my previous research has focused on understanding the nature of prejudice (i.e., racism and sexism). I study both explicit (i.e., deliberate, controllable) and implicit (i.e., automatic, less controllable) prejudice and how and when they lead to discrimination when making outcome allocation decisions (e.g., who should be hired or promoted).  

In addition, I study the effects of prejudice and discrimination for those who are stigmatized.  I recently published a paper on the effects of stigmatization on devalued group members' health, well-being, and performance.  I used a stress and coping model to explore when people are more vulnerable to the negative effects of stigmatization and when people are more likely to demonstrate resilience.

Finally, I study how people make sense of the differences that exist between individuals and groups in society: are they a result of a fairly operating meritocracy, in which the cream rises to the top, or are they a result of injustices, such as discrimination or favoritism? Such different understandings of why inequality exists plays an important role in determining people's reaction to social and organizational policies that are designed to mitigate inequalities like  employment equity, or diversity initiatives. My colleagues and I have found that prejudice, justice beliefs, and beliefs about the cause of societal inequality interact to affect whether people support programs that aim to reduce inequality.

Advising Philosophy:

My goal is to conduct top-quality research in close collaboration with students. As a supervisor, I believe it is my role to help students to develop their skills, self-efficacy, and autonomy. I try to create an environment in my lab that is supportive and challenging. Students who work with me get a lot of guidance and feedback-from me and from other students in the lab. I expect students in my lab to be motivated, organized, courteous of others, hardworking, and to have burning intellectual curiosity. Junior students work with me to develop a shared line of research. Senior students have the flexibility to select their own topic under the umbrella of social justice issues. I am expecting to accept new students to my lab for Fall 2017.

Research Areas: Industrial-Organizational
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

My research interests cover several areas within industrial/organizational psychology. Currently, my interests are in the areas of employee performance appraisals and job performance. In the domain of employee performance appraisals, my work has been aimed at understanding the causes and consequences of managers having considerations other than accuracy when rating employee performance. My research into job performance concentrates on the dimensions of prosocial and deviant workplace behaviours. Specifically, I am interested in understanding intraindividual (within-person) processes that lead to the occurrence of prosocial and deviant workplace behaviour.

Research Areas: Industrial-Organizational

My research centres on the study of attention and working memory and how attention and memory operations change as individuals progress from childhood to old age. I have both basic and applied research programs.

Visual Attention lab
VMI 204 lab
(519) 824-4120 ext. 53474

DRIVE lab (University of Guelph Driving Simulator lab)
1311 Thornborough Building
(519) 824-4120 ext. 53474

Research Areas: Neuroscience and Applied Cognitive Sciences
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: No

My group investigates the neurobiology of cognition, with an emphasis on learning and memory. Topics of interest include memory acquisition, consolidation, and reconsolidation in rats and mice, as well as cognitive testing in rodent models of human disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia.

Research Areas: animal, behavioral pharmacology, learning and memory, Neuroscience and Applied Cognitive Sciences, neuroscience of behavior
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

I was trained as a counselling psychologist and have worked as both practitioner and researcher in university and public health settings in South Africa and China, focusing on cultural issues in mental health. My PhD and current work deals with the socio-technical aspects of psychological science (such as the Implicit Association Test), as well as the psychology of science and technology.

Research Areas: Applied Social, critical psychology, prejudice and discrimination, science & technology, theoretical psychology
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

My research is primarily concerned with cognition-emotion interactions, with a particular focus on how our thoughts and feelings are implicitly shaped by external environmental cues, and internal bodily signals. This work involves a combinination of behavioural experiments and psychophysiological measures (skin conductance, cardiovascular measures, facial muscle activity, EEG/ERP), with the ultimate goal of linking underlying changes in physiology to subjective feeling states and corresponding behaviours.

Research Areas: attention, emotion, learning and memory, Neuroscience and Applied Cognitive Sciences
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

My research focuses on children's emotional development. In particular, I am interested in the ways in which the family system contributes to children's development of (mal)adaptive emotion skills and the role of these emotion skills in child psychopathology. I seek to translate this knowledge to the clinical care context as a means of gaining insight into how treatment approaches might be adapted to maximize therapeutic outcomes for youth.

Research Areas: Clinical Psychology: Applied Developmental Emphasis, emotion, parent-child relationships, research-practice