Collaborative Specialization in International Development Studies (IDS)

The Department of Food, Agricultural & Resource Economics


Master's Collaborative Specialization in International Development [MSC.FARE.IDEV] or [MFARE.FARE.IDEV:I]

The Department of Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics participates in the Collaborative Specialization in International Development.  This collaborative specialization provides a focal point for graduate teaching and research in the area of international development.  The program combines training in a particular discipline with exposure to a broad range of social-science perspectives.  Faculty expertise encompasses various aspects of development in Asia, Africa, Eastern and Western Europe and the Americas.

Admission Requirements 
All students entering the Master of Science or Master in Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics program must have achieved the University required minimum 70% (B-) average or equivalent. Students wishing to pursue an MSc or MFARE in FARE with the designation "Collaborative Specialization" apply through the Department of Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics.  Students wishing to pursue this degree will typically have a degree in food, agricultural or resource economics (or economics) and an interest in broadening their education to include an understanding of international development issues.  Students maintain their focus on food, agricultural or resource economics as a discipline.  In addition to meeting the admission criteria of the Department of Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics, students must also meet those of  the  International Development Studies  as posted on their website (www.ids.uoguelph.ca/).  

General Course Requirements
The general core requirements for the Collaborative Specialization in International Development and additional courses designated by departments are listed at the IDS website (www.ids.uoguelph.ca/). 

Students following the Collaborative Specialization within the Department of Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics either through the MSc (thesis-based) or the MFARE (course-based) program.  Requirements within the Department of Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics are listed below. 

Thesis-Based MSc:

  • Applied Microeconomics for Agricultural Economists (FARE*6380)
  • Applied Policy Analysis I (FARE*6910)
  • Applied Quantitative Methods for Agricultural Economists (FARE*6970)
  • The Methodologies of Economics (FARE*6100)
  • Seminar in Agricultural Economics (FARE*6800)
  • Agricultural in Economic Development (FARE*6600) 
  • One additional course
  • Thesis

Course-Based MFARE:

  • Applied Microeconomics for Agricultural Economists (FARE*6380)
  • Applied Policy Analysis I (FARE*6910)
  • Applied Quantitative Methods for Agricultural Economists (FARE*6970)
  • The Methodologies of Economics (FARE*6100)
  • Seminar in Agricultural Economics (FARE*6800)
  • Agricultural in Economic Development (FARE*6600)
  • Advanced Topics in Agricultural Economics (FARE*6400)
  • One additional course
  • Research Project (FARE*6140)

Master's Thesis

Students following the thesis-based Collaborative Specialization in International Development  in the Department of Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics are required to complete a thesis in the same manner as students following the MSc in Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics. See sections on MSc student supervision and Master's thesis.

To provide guidance to students, previous thesis topics of Master's students in the Department are available on the Departmental website:

http://www.uoguelph.ca/fare/publications/theses

For further information, please check the IDS Program Website.

[top]


 

PhD Collaborative Specialization in International Development [PHD.FARE.IDEV]

 

The Department of Food, Agricultural & Resource Economics participates in the Collaborative Specialization in International Development.   The PhD Collaborative Specialization in International Development provides an opportunity for advanced students to engage with interdisciplinary development theories and to conduct research on international development issues based on approaches of selected academic disciplines. The Collaborative Specialization is undertaken jointly with a discipline-based degree and students enter the Collaborative Specialization through a collaborating department with a PhD program.  

Based on the experience of faculty advisors in key collaborating departments, the program focuses on issues such as international political economy, food security, environmental dynamics and governance, gender inequality, rural development, long-term economic change, and other interdisciplinary cutting-edge topics in international development.
 

Admission Requirements

All students entering the  Doctoral of Philosophy Collaborative Specialization in International Development  must have achieved the University requirements for a Doctoral program which include 1) having completed a Bachelor’s and a Master’s degree in a relevant discipline or related interdisciplinary field from a recognized post-secondary institution and 2) must have achieved a minimum B average in their Master’s program.  Applicants must also have demonstrated strong potential for research.

Students wishing to pursue the PhD degree with the designation “Collaborative Specialization in International Development” must enter through a participating department.  Students must first meet the admission requirements of the department of their choice and demonstrate familiarity with conceptual frameworks employed in social sciences. 

In addition to the specific departmental admission requirements, applicants are expected to have a strong background in the social sciences a demonstrable track record of experience in the course-based study of development issues, development research and/or development practice and a stated research interest relating to international development.

Students are admitted to the collaborative  specialization in International Development PhD program in the fall of each year and must meet the specific departmental admission requirements.  Students entering this program are expected to have satisfied the requirements, or their equivalents, of the department’s PhD degree in Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics.
 

Degree Requirements

Students complete requirements for the departmental degree as well as the IDS components which consist of two courses, including an interdisciplinary course on theories and debates (IDEV*6800) and a course to enable students to link their particular disciplinary or multidisciplinary research to the wider fields of development studies and development practice (IDEV*6850). 

While the students have to successfully complete these courses to remain in the collaborative IDS program, they do not have to pass a separate qualifying examination in addition to the departmental qualifying exam. Furthermore, the expectation is that the IDS students’ PhD research will bridge two or more disciplines in a way that relates to the field of IDS.   Students are therefore advised to seek information from their selected department.
 

General Course Requirements

The general requirements for the IDS program are as follows: 

·         IDEV*6800: Theories and Debates in Development

·         IDEV*6850: Development Research and Practice

In addition, students following the IDS program within the Department of Food, Agricultural & Resource Economics are required to complete the following courses: 

Microeconomic Theory:

·         ECON*6000: Microeconomic Theory I

·         ECON*6010: Microeconomic Theory II

Economic Research Methods:

·         ECON*6140: Econometrics I

·         ECON*6016: Econometrics II

·         FARE*6970 Applied Quantitative Methods for Agricultural Economics

·         FARE*6100 The Methodologies of Economics

Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics:

·         FARE*6920: Applied Policy Analysis II

·         FARE*6400: Advanced Topics in Agricultural Economics

• Plus ONE from:

     • FARE*6940 Food Firms, Consumers and Markets II 

     • FARE*6960 Natural Resource Economics II 

Plus, ONE other graduate course (which can be one of the two IDS core courses) approved by the student's advisory committee

Second IDS core course
 

Qualifying Exam  

Students in the IDS PhD program in the Department of Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics must satisfy the Department’s Qualification Examination in the same manner as PhD students in Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics.

There are no IDS qualifying exam separate from the departmental one. However, students will have to pass the taught PhD-level IDEV courses, and in particular the research paper presentation as part of IDEV*6850, in order to remain in, and complete, the collaborative program. The IDS core courses are designated in a way that they can contribute to the students' preparation for the departmental qualifying exam (for instance, the term papers may be related to one or two fields covered in the departmental qualifying exam).
 

Doctoral Research

IDS students are expected to bridge two or more disciplines in their PhD research in a way that relates to the field of international development. IDEV*6850 ensures both the interdisciplinary orientation and the development relevance of the doctoral research.


[top]