History and Culture of Mexico (HIST*3150) | College of Arts

History and Culture of Mexico (HIST*3150)

Code and section: HIST*3150*01

Term: Fall 2019

Instructor: Karen Racine

Details

Course Synopsis:

This course will cover the history and culture of Mexico from its pre-Columbian civilizations to the present. Topics include: Aztec and Mayan civilizations, Cortés and conquest, the Inquisition, rebel nuns, independence, the Mexican-American War and loss of Texas, the Alamo, the great Mexican Revolution, revolutionary artists like Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera, indigenismo, student revolts and the 1968 Olympics, and Zapatista movement in Chiapas. This year we pay particular attention to the history of the US border to gain a deeper understanding of current news. Students have free choice of topic for their major research essay.

Typical Methods of Evaluation and Weights (may change):

In-class writing assignment #1    15%
In-class writing assignment #2    15%
Participation/ discussion        10%
Research Essay            30%
Final Exam                 30%

Texts and/or Resources Required (may change):

W. Beezley, Mexico in World History (textbook)
G. Joseph & T. Henderson, eds, The Mexico Reader (documents)
Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, The Response/ La Respuesta
Kelly Hernández, Migra!  History of the US Border Patrol

Please note:  This is a preliminary web course description only.  The department reserves the right to change without notice any information in this description.  The final, binding course outline will be distributed in the first class of the semester.

LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The University of Guelph resides on the land of the Between the Lakes Treaty No. 3, the territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit. This land is part of the Dish with One Spoon, a covenant between Indigenous nations to live peaceably on the territories of the Great Lakes region. We recognize that today this gathering place is home to many First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and acknowledging them reminds us of our collective responsibility to the land where we learn, live and work.