Canadian Social History (HIST*3660) | College of Arts

Canadian Social History (HIST*3660)

Code and section: HIST*3660*01

Term: Fall 2019

Instructor: Catharine Wilson

Details

Course Description:

This course examines new directions in social history that have emerged in the last decade and focuses on the 19th and 20th centuries.  The course is divided into three sections which focus on how HOME, WORK, and PLAY were historically understood and experienced by people in the past.  Special attention will be given to spatial context and gendered ideals and experiences.  Students will engage a wide variety of historical evidence, methods and approaches as they learn about evolving cultural ideals that characterized Canada in an age of immigration, industrialization, urbanization, and nation building.

Course Format:

Two lectures per week and bi-weekly seminars

Learning Outcomes:

By the successful completion of this course, an assiduous student will have learned to:

1)    Critically analyze primary sources by doing two document assignments
2)    Critically analyze scholarly articles in seminars
3)    Write concisely and persuasively
4)    Communicate knowledge about social history and its historiography
5)    Communicate effectively in a seminars
6)    Lead a seminar discussion with thought-provoking questions  
7)    Synthesize knowledge learned in lectures, seminars and course assignments into a meaningful whole on the final exam

Methods of Evaluation and Weights:

Seminars (participation and leadership)    30%
Document Analysis 1            20%
Document Analysis 2            20%
Final Exam                30%

Required Texts:

James Opp and John C. Walsh, eds.  Home, Work, and Play, 3rd edition (Oxford University Press, 2015)

Please note: This is a preliminary web course description only.  The department reserves the right to change without notice any information in this description.  The final, binding course outline will be distributed in the first class of the semester.

LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The University of Guelph resides on the land of the Between the Lakes Treaty No. 3, the territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit. This land is part of the Dish with One Spoon, a covenant between Indigenous nations to live peaceably on the territories of the Great Lakes region. We recognize that today this gathering place is home to many First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and acknowledging them reminds us of our collective responsibility to the land where we learn, live and work.