The Universe Within: From Quantum to Cosmos | College of Arts

The Universe Within: From Quantum to Cosmos

Posted on Wednesday, November 7th, 2012

turok posterLecture Series sponsored by the College of Arts and The Bookshelf

2012 Massey Lecturer Neil Turok 

Monday, November 26th, 2012 at 7:00pm
Lakeside Hope House, 75 Norfolk Street, Downtown Guelph (formerly Norfolk United Church)

with host Don Bruce, Dean, College of Arts, University of Guelph

Every technology we rely on today was created by the human mind, seeking to understand the universe around us. Scientific knowledge is our most precious possession, and our future will be shaped by the breakthroughs to come.

In this personal, visionary, and fascinating work, Neil Turok, Director of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, explores the transformative scientific discoveries of the past three centuries - from classical mechanics, to the nature of light, to the bizarre world of the quantum and the evolution of the cosmos. Each new discovery has, over time, yielded new technologies causing paradigm shifts in the organization of society. Now, he argues, we are on the cusp of another major transformation: the coming quantum revolution that will supplant our current digital age. Facing this brave new world, Turok calls for creatively re-inventing the way advanced knowledge is developed and shared, and opening access to the vast, untapped pools of intellectual talent in the developing world.

Elegantly written, deeply provocative and highly inspirational, The Universe Within is, above all, about the future -  of science, society and ourselves.

Advance tickets available from The Bookshelf or at the door - $8 General Admission - $6 Student

 

LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The University of Guelph resides on the land of the Between the Lakes Treaty No. 3, the territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit. This land is part of the Dish with One Spoon, a covenant between Indigenous nations to live peaceably on the territories of the Great Lakes region. We recognize that today this gathering place is home to many First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and acknowledging them reminds us of our collective responsibility to the land where we learn, live and work.