Pablo Ramirez | College of Arts

Pablo Ramirez

Associate Professor
School of English and Theatre Studies
Email: 
pramirez@uoguelph.ca
Phone number: 
x 53262
Office: 
MacKinnon 434
Summary: 

Areas of Specialization: Nineteenth-Century American Literature, Law and Literature, Latinx Literature and Cultural Production, Memory Studies, Nineteenth-Century Literature of the Supernatural and the Occult, Creative Writing.

Description

Pablo A. Ramirez received his PhD from the University of Michigan and BA from Yale University. He is an associate professor in the School of English and Theatre Studies. He teaches nineteenth-century American literature and Latinx Studies. He has published (or forthcoming) peer-reviewed essays in Nineteenth-Century Literature (2020), J19: The Journal of Nineteenth-Century Americanists (2020), Arizona Quarterly (2014), ESQ: Journal of the American Renaissance (2011), Aztlán: Journal of Chicano Studies (2010), and Canadian Review of American Studies (2009). He also has chapters in Re-Imagining Community and Civil Society in Latin America and the Caribbean (2016) and New Essays on Latina/o Canadian Theatre (2014). 

Dr. Ramirez is currently working on a project titled, “Consent of the Conquered: Californio Romances and Contractual Freedom in Nineteenth-Century America.” This project examines how nineteenth-century Californian women writers engaged the language of contract in their cross-cultural romances in order to historicize, justify, or critique the shifting overlap between an American republic that idealized contractual unions and an American empire based on the abridgement of consent. Dr. Ramirez’s other main area of research is contemporary Latinx literature. His book project, titled "Collective Memory in the Borderlands," explores how Latinx writers engage both historical and collective memories in their fiction to overcome the gaps and omissions of nationalist archives and histories.

 He advises graduate students in both the School of English and Theatre Studies and the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program. He also holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Miami and frequently serves as a second reader for the Creative Writing MFA program. 

 

REARCH AND TEACHING INTERESTS

Nineteenth-Century American Literature

Law and Literature

Latinx Literature and Cultural Production

Memory Studies

Nineteenth-Century Literature of the Supernatural and the Occult

 

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

“The Woman of Tomorrow: Gertrude Atherton and the Latina Foremother of the Californian New Woman.” Nineteenth-Century Literature forthcoming (March 2020).

“Inherited Obligations: Conquest, Californio Promises, and Native American Land in Helen Hunt Jackson’s Ramona.” J19: The Journal of Nineteenth-Century Americanists forthcoming (Spring 2020): 147-169.

“Reframing the Archive and Expanding Collective Memory in order to Bridge the Divide between Community and Civil Society in Yxta Maya Murray's The Conquest.” In Gordana Yovanovich and Roberta Rics (Eds.), Re-imagining Community and Civil Society in Latin America and the Caribbean (pp. 63-75). London and New York:  Routledge, 2016.

"Conquest’s Child: Gold, Contract and American Imperialism in Ruiz De Burton’s Who Would Have Thought It?" Arizona Quarterly: A Journal of American Literature, Culture, and Theory 70.4 (Winter 2014): 143-165.

“Remembering, Restaging and Reframing: Trauma and Borderlands Collective Memory in Guillermo Verdecchia's Fronteras Americanas.” In Natalie Alvarez (Ed.), New Essays on Latina/o Canadian Theatre (pp. 200-222). Toronto:  Playwrights Canada Press, 2014

"American Imperialism in the Age of Contract: Herbert Spencer and Failed Contractual Capitalism in Ruiz de Burton’s The Squatter and the Don." ESQ: Journal of the American Renaissance 57.4 (2011): 427-455.

"Toward a Borderlands Ethics: The Undocumented Migrant and Haunted Communities in Contemporary Chicana/o Fiction." Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies 35.1 (Spring 2010): 49-67.

"Collective Memory and the Borderlands in Guillermo Verdecchia’s Fronteras Americanas." Latin American Identities After 1980. Ed. Gordana Yovanovich and Amy Hurtas. Kitchener, ON: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2010.

"Resignifying Preservation: A Borderlands Response to American Eugenics in Jovita Gonzalez and Eve Raleigh’s Caballero." Canadian Review of American Studies 39.1 (2009): 21-39.

 

 

 

 

LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The University of Guelph resides on the land of the Between the Lakes Treaty No. 3, the territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit. This land is part of the Dish with One Spoon, a covenant between Indigenous nations to live peaceably on the territories of the Great Lakes region. We recognize that today this gathering place is home to many First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and acknowledging them reminds us of our collective responsibility to the land where we learn, live and work.