Undergraduate Courses Fall 2020

Welcome to the updated courses section of FARE.  Here you will find short course descriptions and information about how courses will be delivered in Fall 2020.  An underlined course code and title indicate that the course outline is available and can be accessed by clicking on the course code/title.  Course outlines may be subject to minor changes until the end of the first week of classes, i.e. September 12.

FARE*2700  Survey of N​atural Resource Economics (Instructor:  Qin Xu)

Course description:  This course examines how humans, within a society, allocate natural resources - e.g., water, land, forests, and fisheries. Economic concepts and methods provide the basis for discussing and understanding both the use and misuse of natural resources.
Course delivery:  Entirely online. 

FARE*3000  International Food Sector and Policy Analysis (Instructor:  Spencer Henson)
Course description:  This course explores the structure and functioning of the agri-food sector beyond the farm gate, including food processing, distribution and retailing, and the implications for the functioning of food markets in terms of the price, quality and safety of food. The focus of the course is on the agri-food sector in Canada and globally, such that it explores the structure and functioning of the agri-food sector in different geographical locations, at different levels of economic development, etc. By applying an applied industrial organisation perspective, the course examines the behaviour of actors within the food sector and the role of policies at the regional, national and international levels.
Course delivery:  This course will be taught entirely online in Fall 2020. Each week we will meet for two sessions. The first will be a short lecture which introduces the topic of the week and provides a summary of the main issues being covered. Recognizing that nobody can stay focused on an online lecture for very long, each session will be broken up into shorter sections, after which there will be an activity that applies the material. The second weekly session will be an open discussion of an issue related to the subject matter currently being studied, and an opportunity for anyone in the class to ask questions, raise issues, etc. These sessions will be interactive, so their success will depend on students coming to class having prepared. The assessed assignments for the course have also been adapted for remote learning. For example, students will record a weekly video that provides their thoughts and reflections on the most recent lecture, discussion and readings. Students will also work through case studies that apply the subject matter of the course and focus on what can be learned from the evolution of the food sector in different parts of the world. There is no final examination. 

FARE*3030  The Firm and Markets (Instructor:  Yu Na Lee)
Course description:  This course focuses on the application of microeconomic theory to managerial problems.  Lectures, readings, problem sets, lab sessions, case studies, and discussions integrate theory and applications. Topics include: regression analysis, demand analysis and demand function estimation, cost function estimation, market structure, pricing policy, contracting and information economics, risk analysis, and capital budgeting.
Course delivery:  Entirely online.

FARE*3250  Food And International Development (Instructor:  Sylvanus Kwaku Afesorgbor)
Course description:  This course provides students with an economic and political perspective on issues in international development and globalization related to food and agriculture. Different economic theories and approaches are used to understand various economic phenomena in the development context. Especially, we will focus on theories of international development in the introductory lectures. Students are encouraged to consider critically an economic and empirical approaches to the analysis of development issues related to food and agriculture, alongside the perspectives of other social science disciplines. Throughout the course, food and agriculture as development issues are considered primarily. It examines the causes and consequences of food crisis, food insecurity, poverty, and malnutrition from the perspectives of developing countries. It discusses the potential solutions to these problems and looks at the role of globalization in mitigating these problems.
Course delivery:   The course will be delivered online using the Zoom platform. The link to join the Zoom Meeting can be accessed through the CourseLink site. Zoom has been enabled as an add-on module in the CourseLink for the course. We will hold two 80-minute sessions weekly and each session will consist of two sub-sessions of 35 minutes each and 10 minutes break. Before a session, I will upload a self-explained (Latex-prepared) slides covering each topic in the course outline.  The mode of assessment will consist of one mid-term which will be an opened-book (take-home) exam for 1 hour with a weight of 20%. In addition, an individual written economic report with a weight of 30% will also be required. We will also have a group work consisting of about 4-5 students presenting an empirical paper related to the topics in the course of their choice from a reputable journal. The group will have a weight of 10% and this will be presented using Zoom by any member of the group. The final exam will have weight of 40% and this will be an opened-book (take-home) exam for 2 hours.

FARE*3310  Operations Management (Instructor:  Getu Hailu)
Course description:  The decision-making role of the operations manager in transforming inputs into desired outputs is the primary focus of this course. The major issues and problems of designing, scheduling, operating, and controlling the production system will be examined. Operations management involves the activities related to producing and delivering goods or services that a customer wants and is willing to pay for.  As you will see, producing a good or service includes many complex activities and involves different functions and many people. To become effective managers, students must be aware of the role that operations management plays in their job and in the performance of their organization.  This course will introduce the main concepts in operations and supply chain management.  It will provide insight into some of the key decisions and techniques used in providing a good or service.  It will focus on the key requirement for effective management of both internal and supply chain activities and the effective control of those activities. FARE*3310 is intensive and requires a fair amount of commitment from the student. It is essential to keep up with the materials covered. You are strongly encouraged to attend every class and spend enough time on your own to review the materials before attending the next class. Attendance and participation in class sessions is expected. Some exam questions may cover material discussed in class only.
Course delivery:  Entirely online. 

FARE*3320  Supply Chain Management (Instructor:  Michael von Massow)
Course description:  This course focuses on the coordination of decision-making along food industry supply chains and networks to achieve strategic and operational goals. Building on the concepts delivered in FARE*3310 Operations Management, it uses a combination of lectures and case-based teaching to instruct students in the principles of supply chain management and key concepts for the analysis of supply chain management issues.
Course delivery:  Entirely online. 

FARE*4210  World Agriculture, Food Security and Economic Development (Instructor:  Spencer Henson)
Course description:  This course examines the role of agriculture in determining food security in low and middle-income countries and in promoting overall processes of economic development. The course uses basic economic concepts to understand the inter-relationships between agriculture, the wider agri-food system and food security, including the supply of food and the livelihoods of those engaged in the agri-food system. Through analysis of policies and programs aimed at promoting food security in diverse contexts, the course reflects on progress and challenges in achieving food and nutrition security for all across the globe.
Course delivery:  This course will be taught entirely online in Fall 2020. Each week we will meet for two sessions. The first will be a short lecture which introduces the topic of the week and provides a summary of the main issues being covered. Recognizing that nobody can stay focused on an online lecture for very long, each session will be broken up into shorter sections, after which there will be an activity that applies the material. The second weekly session will be an open discussion of an issue related to the subject matter currently being studied, and an opportunity for anyone in the class to ask questions, raise issues, etc. These sessions will be interactive, so their success will depend on students coming to class having prepared. The assessed assignments for the course have also been adapted for remote learning. For example, students will record a weekly video that provides their thoughts and reflections on the most recent lecture, discussion and readings. Students will also work through case studies that apply the subject matter of the course and focus on what can be learned from efforts to promote food security in different parts of the world. There is no final examination.

FARE*4290  Land Economics    (Instructor:  Brady Deaton)
Course description:  This course examines the influence of land and property on the economy. Economic development, food production, and environmental quality are the primary topics of our general discussions. Students will learn to apply economic concepts and applied methods to better understand these issues.
Course delivery:   The course is delivered in a synchronized format. Students will attend the class online, or in the classroom, at the scheduled class time. All students enrolled in the class, even those enrolled in the in-class section, may choose to attend the class online. The class consists of presentations by the instructor, online facilitated discussions of key readings, questions and debate. Throughout the class, economic theory and econometric methods are emphasized.

*The capacity to support the in-class engagement will depend on the University’s ongoing assessment of the COVID-19 situation and may change throughout the semester. Importantly, all student’s enrolled in the face-to-face section will be able to attend classes online.

FARE*4370  Food & Agri-Marketing Management (Instructor:  Andreas Boecker)
Course description:  Marketing managers face a wide array of decisions. These range from major ones, e.g. on the features of a new complex product or the volume of an annual advertising budget, to minor decisions, such as the exact wording on new packaging or the position of the brand logo in an ad. Marketing managers proactively seek to influence the level, timing and composition of demand to meet their organization’s goals. The course focuses on formulating marketing strategy and developing marketing plans for food and agricultural businesses, including selecting market target(s) designing the marketing mix (product, price, communication, distribution).
Course delivery:  The course will be delivered entirely online in the flipped class room format. In addition to online reading material, Andreas will provide learning materials online (such as videos, animations, voice over slide decks, etc.) to explain key concepts and cases, provide examples and provide guidance for students’ own research and learning activities. These materials will be posted on their scheduled date in the course outline and can be accessed at any time. The class will be split into two sections to allow for more engaging interactions through smaller group sizes. For each section a live session will be held online once a week to discuss and apply the learned material to real world marketing management decisions. Students are expected to process the reading material and the learning materials provided online before the live sessions. There will also be a weekly 75-minute Q&A session for the entire class, addressing current issues in food and agri-marketing. Students will be assigned to groups of 3 or 4 early on and work on a marketing plan project (40% of final grade) with graded deliverables product/service idea proposal; documentation of planning and individuals' contributions, market analysis, customer analysis, written marketing plan, digital presentation. Individual assessments will be quizzes and midterm (30% of final grade) and digital assessments (30% of final grade), where students can choose among such formats as infographic, digital poster, podcast, video, blog, vlog, social media posts, voice-over slide deck, etc. There is no final exam. 

FARE*4500  Decision Science (Instructor:  Alfons Weersink)
Course description:  Quantitative techniques such as classical optimization, mathematical programming, simulation and input-output models are applied to firm, interregional, industry, and international problem situations in agricultural economics, including those dealing with resources and the environment. Time and risk and uncertainty dimensions are addressed.
Course delivery:  Face-to-face sessions will be live streamed and recorded. Off-campus students can virtually attend and engage in discussions.   

FARE*4550/60  Independent Studies I/II  (Instructor consent required)
Course description:  A project based independent study course for majors in Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics (Bachelor of Arts degree programs), Food and Agricultural Business (Bachelor of Commerce), and Environmental Economics and Policy (Bachelor of Science in Environmental Sciences).
Course delivery:  Flexible, but mostly online.   

UNIV*3140  Flexible Internship in Agri-Food  (Instructor: Jeanine Boulter-Bitzer)
Course description:  This course offers online and classroom components together with a forty (40) hour experiential learning opportunity (“Internship”) in the agri-food sector with government, industry or civil society organizations. Students will learn about the integrated nature of the agri-food industry in Canada and the many forces that shape this system, including their own food choices. Knowledge of current and future trends in the agri-food system, together with the development of certain career-readiness skills, will assist students who may have a career interest in the agri-food sector. The timing for the completion of the Internship is somewhat flexible. It can be completed during the semester in which course is taken or up until the end of the following semester. Successful completion of the Internship is mandatory to complete the course.
Course delivery:  Entirely online.