Natural Disasters in Global History (HIST*3460) | College of Arts

Natural Disasters in Global History (HIST*3460)

Code and section: HIST*3460*01

Term: Winter 2019

Instructor: Stuart McCook

Details

Course Synopsis:

The history of natural disasters offers insights into how the relationships between human societies and their natural environments have changed over time. Through a series of case studies, the course will trace the evolving history of natural disasters in global context from the late medieval period to the present. The course will address thematic issues including the construction of vulnerable landscapes and societies; the short-term impacts of disasters; changing patterns of disaster relief; and disasters and social change.

Learning Outcomes:

After successful completion of this course, an assiduous student will have learned to:

  1. understand natural disasters as outcomes of human and natural processes;
  2. understand the global processes that have shaped natural disasters over time;
  3. use key research resources to find primary and secondary sources for their project;
  4. critically evaluate primary and secondary sources at an appropriate level.

Method of Evaluation and Weights:

Midterm Exam    20%
Microthemes       25%
Research Paper  35%
Final Exam           20%
Total                   100%

Texts Required:

•    Course materials available on Courselink

Please note: This is a preliminary website description only. The department reserves the right to change without notice any information in this description. The final, binding course outline will be distributed in the first class of the semester.

 

LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The University of Guelph resides on the land of the Between the Lakes Treaty No. 3, the territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit. This land is part of the Dish with One Spoon, a covenant between Indigenous nations to live peaceably on the territories of the Great Lakes region. We recognize that today this gathering place is home to many First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and acknowledging them reminds us of our collective responsibility to the land where we learn, live and work.