Research Areas by Faculty

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Our department houses some of the top researchers in the their field. There are many opportunities for students to get involved in research. Use the Search below to browse research areas by Faculty

I use behavioural measures, eye tracking, EEG/ERP and fMRI to study visual attention, perception, and memory. If you are interested in joining the lab, or want to learn more about the research I do, please see the website for my research lab (linked above).

Prospecitve graduate students: We are looking for bright, enthusiastic graduate students to join the lab in Fall 2018. If you are interested, you should apply to the NACS graduate program offered by our department.

Prospective undergraduate students: Please see instructions on my lab website about how to "Join the Lab", and options for completing experiential learning opportunities.

Research Areas: attention, learning and memory, Neuroscience and Applied Cognitive Sciences, perception, vision
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

Mark Fenske, PhD, is a cognitive-neuroscientist and Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Guelph. His research combines neuroimaging techniques with studies of human behaviour to examine factors that are critical for healthy cognitive and emotional functioning. His writing, teaching, and public speaking are likewise aimed at helping others understand that learning a bit about the brain can be helpful in enhancing performance and well-being. Dr. Fenske's efforts to translate scientific findings and make them accessible to the public at large includes the bestselling book, 'The Winner's Brain: 8 Strategies Great Minds Use to Achieve Success' and his popular 'Better Brain' column, which regularly appeared in the Globe & Mail.

Cognition-emotion interactions, attention, memory, visual cognition, neuroimaging

 

 

Research Areas: attention, emotion, learning and memory, motivation, Neuroscience and Applied Cognitive Sciences
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

Francesco Leri is a full Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Guelph.

His general area of expertise is Behavioural Pharmacology and Neuroscience.  Dr. Leri investigates psychological and neuropharmacological mechanisms involved in the development, persistence and recurrence of behaviours reinforced by chemical (cocaine, heroin, oxycodone) and natural (monosaccharaides and disaccharides) rewards.  Through psychological (i.e., conditioning), pharmacological and neurobiological experimentations in laboratory animals, his studies have been providing basic scientific knowledge critical to the understanding of hedonic processes, reinforcement monarchisms, as well as addictions and their long-term treatments.

FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

The laboratory of Dr. Leri typically offers 1 research position x term  for undergraduate students completing NEUR, PSYC or BIOM research internship courses.  There are no positions for volunteers.

These course-based research positions are quite competitive. That is, selected students tend to display a high record of academic performance (> 85% overall average), appropriate academic background (courses in Neuroscience, Neuropharmacology, Learning and Statistics), as well as a strong desire to pursue post-graduate degrees in Neuroscience, Psychology, Medicine or associated disciplines. 

To be considered for one of these courses in upcoming terms, e-mail statement of interest and unofficial copy of  transcripts. 

Research Areas: addiction, behavioral pharmacology, learning and memory, Neuroscience and Applied Cognitive Sciences, neuroscience of behavior
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

Professor and Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Behavioural Neuroscience

Psychopharmacology, Taste aversion learning, Behavioural Neuroscience, Addiction, Cannabinoids

Our program of research cuts across the traditional boundaries of psychology, pharmacology, and neurobiology to understand processes of learning, emotion, sickness and addiction. The research is leading to a better understanding of basic neural processes involved in the modulation of the pharmacological properties of drugs, with specific applications to controlling nausea and vomiting in humans. We are currently investigating chemicals found naturally in the human body that mimic those in marijuana. These "endogenous cannabinoids," discovered in the 1990s, play a role not only in controlling nausea and vomiting, but also in learning, memory, protection against stroke and cancer, appetite, reward and addiction.

Research Areas: Neuroscience and Applied Cognitive Sciences
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

My research centres on the study of attention and working memory and how attention and memory operations change as individuals progress from childhood to old age. I do basic research on attention but I also do applied research on driving and collision risk using a driving simulator.

Visual Attention lab

VMI 204 lab
(519) 824-4120 ext. 53474

DRIVE lab (University of Guelph Driving Simulator lab)
1311 Thornborough Building
(519) 824-4120 ext. 53474

Research Areas: Neuroscience and Applied Cognitive Sciences
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

My group investigates the neurobiology of cognition, with an emphasis on learning and memory. Topics of interest include memory acquisition, consolidation, and reconsolidation in rats and mice, as well as cognitive testing in rodent models of human disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia.

Research Areas: animal, behavioral pharmacology, learning and memory, Neuroscience and Applied Cognitive Sciences, neuroscience of behavior
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes

My research program is centered on understanding basic cognitive processes in humans that allow us to encode new information and later retrieve this information from memory. It is now well-known that these processes are not infallible, and are prone to error.  I am particularly interested in the processes that lead to such errors, and how they relate to the monitoring, assessment, and regulation of learning.

Research Areas: attention, emotion, learning and memory, Neuroscience and Applied Cognitive Sciences
Accepting New Experiential Learning Students: Yes