Literature and Arts II F18 (SPAN*3230) | College of Arts

Literature and Arts II F18 (SPAN*3230)

Code and section: SPAN*3230*01

Term: Fall 2018

Instructor: tba

Details

Course objectives:

The main objective of this course is to study a cross section of fictional, visual and performance works by Spanish American artists, filmmakers, playwrights, and writers who address processes of social formation and differences within regional cultures, concepts of national and universal identity, and individual and universal themes of belonging and engagement. We will examine common historical and cultural themes as well as regional and national specificity within Spanish America. We will address gender, sexual identity, race, religion, diaspora, and various theoretical approaches pertinent to the works to be studied in this course.

 

Learning outcomes:

Through consideration of different cultural modes of expression and different forms of art students will gain a broad interdisciplinary understanding, and through analysis they will develop their critical thinking. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to interpret, evaluate and criticize texts, visual and performance works by salient Spanish American writers and artists from the 20th and early 21st centuries.

 

Requirements:

SPAN*2990 or permission of instructor

 

Restrictions:

None

 

Textbooks:

TBA

 

Method of presentation:

Lectures, audio-visual presentations and collaborative class activities.

 

Evaluation method:

TBA

 

Please see Undergraduate Calendar for all Spanish courses offered by the School of Languages and Literatures

 

LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The University of Guelph resides on the land of the Between the Lakes Treaty No. 3, the territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit. This land is part of the Dish with One Spoon, a covenant between Indigenous nations to live peaceably on the territories of the Great Lakes region. We recognize that today this gathering place is home to many First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and acknowledging them reminds us of our collective responsibility to the land where we learn, live and work.