Ottoman Empire, 1300-1923 (HIST*3840) | College of Arts

Ottoman Empire, 1300-1923 (HIST*3840)

Code and section: HIST*3840*01

Term: Fall 2021

Instructor: Evren Altinkas

Details

Method of Delivery:

Each week this course will have two synchronous lecture sessions, which may alternate between on-campus/in-person and remote-virtual formats.

Course Synopsis:

This course will examine the rise of the Ottoman Empire in the 14th century in its historical context, situated strategically in both Europe and the Middle East.  The evolution of this empire from its inception through its struggles and transformations in the course of 600 years as a world empire, until its demise in the 20th century, after the end of World War One will be traced. The periods of Ottoman State will be covered by some interactive methodologies and a comparative approach. 

Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. understand the impact of the Ottoman Empire on Europe and the Middle East;
  2. recognize the diverse structure of the Empire and the nations within it;
  3. develop skills in critical reading, writing, and thinking;
  4. develop skills in library research and critical evaluation of information.

Method of Evaluation and Weights:

Weekly Discussions & Activities    20%
Analytical Paper 30%
Take-Home Final Exam 30%
Presentation 20%

**Please note: This is a preliminary website description only. The department reserves the right to change without notice any information in this description. The final, binding course outline will be distributed in the first class of the semester.**
 

LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The University of Guelph resides on the land of the Between the Lakes Treaty No. 3, the territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit. This land is part of the Dish with One Spoon, a covenant between Indigenous nations to live peaceably on the territories of the Great Lakes region. We recognize that today this gathering place is home to many First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and acknowledging them reminds us of our collective responsibility to the land where we learn, live and work.