Terry Crowley | College of Arts

Terry Crowley

Photo of Terry Crowley
University Professor Emeritus
History
Email: 
tcrowley@uoguelph.ca
Phone number: 
(519) 824-4120 ex. 56529
Lab: 
2022 MacKinnon Extension

Education

Ph.D. Duke University, 1975
M.A. Duke University, 1970
M.A. Carleton University, 1968
B.A. Bishop's University, 1967
 

Professional

Chair, Department of History, 2003 - 2008
University of Guelph India Semester Co-ordinator, 2000-2003
Acting Director, University School of Continuing Education, 1988-89
Foreign Expert, Shenyang Architectural Engineering College, Shenyang City, People's Republic of China, 1987-88
Department of History, University of Guelph, 1971-
Assistant Historian, Fortress of Louisbourg
 

Research

Canadian history, especially rural, agricultural, and women's
 

Publications

 

 

   books

Marriage of Minds: Isabel and Oscar Skelton Reinventing Canada (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2003).

co-authored with Alexander Ross, The College on the Hill: A New History of the Ontario Agricultural College, 1874-1999 (Toronto and Oxford: Dundurn Press, 1999).

Louisbourg, Atlantic Fortress and Seaport (Ottawa: Canadian Historical Association, 1991).

Agnes Macphail and the Politics of Equality (Toronto: Lorimer and Co., 1990).

co-authored with C.A.V. Barker, One Voice: A History of the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association (Ottawa, 1989).

editor, Clio's Craft: A Primer of Historical Methods (Toronto: Copp Clark Pitman, 1988).

   selected articles and book chapters

“Britain and Canada," introductory essay to: Britain and the Americas: Culture, Politics, and History, eds. Will Kaufman and Heidi Macpherson, 3 Vols. (Santa Barbara, Denver, and Oxford: ABC Clio, 2005), 11-21.

co-authored with Justin Kastner, Douglas Powell and Karen Huff, “Scientific Conviction Amidst Scientific Controversy in the Transatlantic Livestock and Meat Trade,” Endeavour (London) 29, no. 2 (June 2005): 78-83.

"Writing for Whom? Isabel Murphy Skelton and Canadian History" and "History and Human Agency: The Case of Agnes Macphail, Canada's First Woman M.P." in Framing our Past: Constructing Canadian Women's History in the Twentieth Century, edited by Sharon Cook and Lorna McLean (Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2001).

"Experience and Representation: Southern Ontario Farm Women and Agricultural Change, 1870-1914," Agricultural History 73 (1999): 238-51.

"Isabel Skelton: Precursor to Canadian Cultural History," in Creating Historical Memory: Canadian Women and the Work of History, edited by A. Prentice and B. Boutilier (Vancouver: UBC Press, 1997), 174-201.

"J.J. Morrison and the Transition in Canadian Farm Movements in the Early Twentieth Century," Agricultural History 71 (1997): 330-56.

"Women, Religion and Freedom in New France," in Larry Eldridge ed., Women and Freedom in Colonial America (New York: New York University Press, 1997): 127-43

"Rural Labour," in Labouring Lives: Work and Workers in Nineteenth -Century Ontario, edited by Paul Craven (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996), 10-103.

"The French Regime to 1760," in A Concise History of Christianity in Canada, edited by Terence Murphy and Roberto Perrin (Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1995), 1-58.

"Understanding Canada's Aboriginal Peoples, A Regional Guide," Canadian Social Studies 27 (1993): 71-5.

"Agnes Macphail and Canadian Working Women," Labour/Le Travail 28 (1991): 129-48.

"The New Canada Movement: Agrarian Youth Protest," Ontario History 80, (1988): 311-325.

"Madonnas Before Magdalenes: Adelaide Hoodless and the Making of the Canadian Gibson Girl," Canadian Historical Review 67 (1986): 520-547.

"Parents in a Hurry: The Early Home and School/Parent-Teacher Movement in Ontario," Histoire Sociale/Social History 20 (1986): 323-342.

 
LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The University of Guelph resides on the land of the Between the Lakes Treaty No. 3, the territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit. This land is part of the Dish with One Spoon, a covenant between Indigenous nations to live peaceably on the territories of the Great Lakes region. We recognize that today this gathering place is home to many First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and acknowledging them reminds us of our collective responsibility to the land where we learn, live and work.