Jade Ferguson | College of Arts

Jade Ferguson

Associate Professor & Graduate Program Coordinator
School of English and Theatre Studies
Email: 
jfergu05@uoguelph.ca
Phone number: 
x 56726 (email is the best way to contact me)
Office: 
MacKinnon 415

Education 

PhD English, Cornell University

MA English, Cornell University

BA English, University of British Columbia

Research and Teaching

My research interests include 19th to mid-20th century Canadian literature, Civil Rights Movement literature and photography, New Southern Studies, and Critical Race Theory. I am working on two monographs: the first is a cultural history of anti-black mob violence in Canada, Lynching in Canaan: Race, Violence, and Cultural Memory in Canada, and the second examines cultural representations of segregation and civil rights activism in Canada in literature, film, and photography, Jim Crow Canada: Segregation and Civil Rights in Canadian Literature and Art.

I teach undergraduate and graduate courses in early and contemporary Canadian literatures, including courses with community-engaged learning components (for example, https://blackpastinguelph.com). I work with and supervise MA and PhD students in the areas of Canadian and US literature, critical race theory, and environmental literary studies. I was awarded the College of Arts Faculty Teaching Excellence Award in 2017.  I am the Graduate Program Coordinator for the School of English & Theatre Studies.

Funded by the Learning Enhancement Fund, I created, organized, and led a pilot program called the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (https://sure.uoguelph.ca) in Summer 2019. SURE provides Students of Colour with the opportunity to develop their academic skills as researchers and fosters a sense of confidence as scholars. With its inclusive learning enivronment and community-engaged component, SURE provides a space for students to affirm their racial identities, experiences, and communities in their praxis-orineted research.

Refereed Journal Articles and Chapters (selected)

"'This is our Alabama': Racial Segregation, Discrimination, and Violence in Tamio Wakayama's Signs of Life." The Global South 9.1 (Spring 2015): 124-146. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/623199/pdf

"Discounting Slavery: The Currency Wars, Minstrelsy, and 'The White Nigger' in Thomas Chandler Haliburton's The Clockmaker." Parallel Encounters: Culture at the Canada-US Border. Editors Gillian Roberts and David Stirrup. Wilfrid Laurier UP, 2014. https://www.wlupress.wlu.ca/Books/P/Parallel-Encounters2