Canada Since 1945 (HIST*3180) | College of Arts

Canada Since 1945 (HIST*3180)

Code and section: HIST*3180*01

Term: Winter 2020

Instructor: Matthew Hayday

Details

Course Synopsis:

This course provides an in-depth examination of political, social, cultural, and economic changes in Canada since the Second World War. Particular attention will be paid to the increased diversity of the Canadian population, the development of Canadian institutions, and the changing role played by Canada in the world.  We will be examining the impact of both the baby boom and significant changes in immigration policy on Canadian institutions.  Significant attention will also be paid to Canadian foreign policy, and Canada’s changing interactions with its major allies.  The emergence of a new “Canadian” culture as a result of demographic changes, social movements, public policy and constitutional reform will also be discussed.

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this course, you should be able to:

  1. identify and explain key factors and forces that have shaped the development of Canadian society, culture, politics, economics and international relations from the Second World War to the present day.
  2. work with and interpret primary source materials in Canadian history.
  3. explain how the historiography of the post-1945 period in Canadian history is evolving and changing to take account of new types of sources and theoretical models.
  4. communicate your ideas orally in a more effective manner, and guide others in discussion of complex concepts, through experience gained by regular participation in class discussions.
  5. communicate your ideas more effectively in written form, and hone your analytical abilities, through skills developed by writing an essay proposal, a book review and an essay.

Methods of Evaluation and Weights:

1. Annotated Bibliography/Research Proposal – 10%  
2. Book Review – 15%
3. Research Essay – 35%
4. Class Discussions and Participation – 20%
5. Final Exam – 20%

Texts and/or Resources Required:

Anastakis, Dimitry. Re-Creation, Fragmentation, and Resilience: A Brief History of Canada since 1945. Toronto: Oxford University Press Canada, 2017.

Students will also have to purchase one additional book for the book review assignment.

*Please note:  This is a preliminary web course description only.  The department reserves the right to change without notice any information in this description.  The final, binding course outline will be distributed in the first class of the semester.

 

Syllabus

LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The University of Guelph resides on the land of the Between the Lakes Treaty No. 3, the territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit. This land is part of the Dish with One Spoon, a covenant between Indigenous nations to live peaceably on the territories of the Great Lakes region. We recognize that today this gathering place is home to many First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and acknowledging them reminds us of our collective responsibility to the land where we learn, live and work.