The Modern World (HIST*1150) | College of Arts

The Modern World (HIST*1150)

Code and section: HIST*1150*02

Term: Winter 2021

Instructor: Jesse Palsetia

Details

Method of Delivery:

This course will be conducted in a remote synchronous format. Class will meet: On Mondays and Wednesday for 80 minutes of lecture and discussions on Zoom;

Course Synopsis:

The Modern World is a broad survey of the major events, issues and themes of that have shaped world history from the late nineteenth through the twentieth century. The Modern World aims to introduce students to the discipline of history, and specifically challenges students to think critically about the nature and development of global interrelatedness, culture contact, identity and difference, the impact of technology, the democratization of society, and mass communications in the modern world. 

Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, student will have learned to:

  1. Understand the major themes of world history in the twentieth century
  2. Identify specific events, individuals, and dates
  3. Appreciate the connections between societies in a global context
  4. Engage with the central issues, research approaches, and practices of history as a discipline;
  5. Develop skills in critical reading, writing, and thinking
  6. Develop skills in library research and critical evaluation of information.

Prerequisites:

None.

Method of Evaluation and Weights:

  • Two Assignments - 20%
  • Mid-term Test - 25%
  • Term Paper - 20%
  • Take-Home Final Exam - 35%

Required Texts:

James Overfield, Sources of Global History Since 1900, Second Edition (Boston: Wadsworth, 2012). ISBN-10: 1-111-83538-1

Carter Findley and John Rothney, Twentieth Century World, Seventh Edition (Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, 2011). ISBN 10: 0-547-21850-8.

*Please note: This is a preliminary website description only. The department reserves the right to change without notice any information in this description. The final, binding course outline will be distributed in the first class of the semester.
 

LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The University of Guelph resides on the land of the Between the Lakes Treaty No. 3, the territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit. This land is part of the Dish with One Spoon, a covenant between Indigenous nations to live peaceably on the territories of the Great Lakes region. We recognize that today this gathering place is home to many First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and acknowledging them reminds us of our collective responsibility to the land where we learn, live and work.