The Vikings (HIST*3520) | College of Arts

The Vikings (HIST*3520)

Code and section: HIST*3520*01

Term: Winter 2021

Instructor: James Fraser

Details

OFFICE HOURS: all consultations in W21 conducted virtually
Contact: all consultations in W21 conducted virtually

Method of Delivery

Two remote synchronous seminars per week (1.5 hours each)

Synopsis

In the ninth century northern Europe and the north Atlantic were transformed by the remarkable exertions of Scandinavian raiders, navigators, invaders and settlers and the political, religious and cultural forces that these ‘vikings’ unleashed. This course examines this fascinating epoch in medieval history by assessing the Scandinavian impact across northern Europe (including a detailed case study of Britain and Ireland) and the Scandinavian cultural background that gave rise to the viking phenomenon. Throughout the course there is an emphasis on reading and assessing the value of medieval sources.

Required Texts:

Somerville, A. A. and R. A. McDonald, The Vikings and their age (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2013)
Somerville, A. A. and R. A. McDonald, (eds.), The Viking Age: a reader, 2nd edition (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2014)

Method of Evaluation and weighting

Mike the Knight and the vikings - 10%
primary source analysis I - 10%
mid-term exam (remote) - 25%
primary source analysis II - 15%
seminar work - 15%
final exam (remote) - 25%

*PLEASE NOTE: This is a preliminary web course description only. The Department reserves the right to change without notice any information in this description. The final, binding course outline is distributed in the first class of the semester.
 

LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The University of Guelph resides on the land of the Between the Lakes Treaty No. 3, the territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit. This land is part of the Dish with One Spoon, a covenant between Indigenous nations to live peaceably on the territories of the Great Lakes region. We recognize that today this gathering place is home to many First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and acknowledging them reminds us of our collective responsibility to the land where we learn, live and work.