Current Graduate Students | College of Arts

Current Graduate Students

Masters Students

Kathryn Comper is a second-year MA student. She is currently a book review editor for the International Review of Scottish Studies .

Scott Jennings is a second-year MA student from Edmonton, AB.  He received his BA in History from MacEwan University.  Scott's research interests focus on urban crime and sexuality in late medieval and early modern Scotland.

Persephone Seale is a second-year MA student. She is currently a book review editor for the International Review of Scottish Studies.

Doctoral Students

Lisa Baer-Tsarfati is a fourth-year PhD student in History and Scottish studies at the University of Guelph. She received a Bachelor’s of Science (Psychology) from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and her MScR (Scottish History), with distinction, from the University of Edinburgh where she studied the gradation of cultural behaviour within elite society in sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century Perthshire. Her doctoral research examines the gendering and construction of ambition in early modern Scotland and its relationship to existing structures of power and control. Lisa currently works in the Centre for Scottish Studies Office and is an assistant editor of the International Review of Scottish Studies.

Chelsea Hartlen is a sixth-year PhD candidate originally from Halifax, NS. She received her BA (Hons) in History and her MA in History from Dalhousie University. Her MA thesis examined female felons in High Court of Justiciary records (1524–1542) and the social management of criminal women in sixteenth-century Scotland. Her doctoral research examines homicide, the administration of justice, and masculinity in late medieval Scotland. Chelsea served the Centre for Scottish Studies as an office administrator and assistant editor of the IRSS from 2017-19. She recently published a chapter on arson and gender entitled 'Catching Fire: Arson, Rough Justice and Gender in Scotland, 1493–1542' in Crossing Borders: Boundaries and Margins in Late Medieval and Early Modern Britain. Essays in Honour of Cynthia J. Neville, edited by Sara M. Butler and Krista J. Kesserling, pp. 153–173 (Leiden: Brill, 2018).

Mariah Hudec is a fifth-year PhD student in literature and Scottish studies at the University of Guelph. She received a BA (Hons) in History from Cape Breton University, and an MScR in Scottish History from the University of Edinburgh, where her research focused on fairy belief in the context of the Scottish witch-hunts. Her current research is focused on how two nineteenth-century popular print forms - collections of Scottish "superstitions" or folk beliefs and Scottish children's literature - have participated in discourses of authenticity and national identity. Mariah currently works in the Centre for Scottish Studies Office and is an assistant editor of the International Review of Scottish Studies

Pictured: Chelsea Hartlen © Chelsea Hartlen, 2016

Chelsea Hartlen

 

 

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The University of Guelph resides on the land of the Between the Lakes Treaty No. 3, the territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit. This land is part of the Dish with One Spoon, a covenant between Indigenous nations to live peaceably on the territories of the Great Lakes region. We recognize that today this gathering place is home to many First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and acknowledging them reminds us of our collective responsibility to the land where we learn, live and work.