Intro to CWRC | College of Arts

Intro to CWRC

2021 Summer Workshops, college of arts, university of guelph

Getting Going with Scholarship Online:
An Introduction to CWRC

Instructors:

Mihaela Ilovan, University of Alberta
Susan Brown, University of Guelph
 

Description: 

The Canadian Writing Research Collaboratory / Le Collaboratoire scientifique des écrits du Canada (CWRC; "quirk"; https://cwrc.ca) is a free online platform that facilitates digital scholarship on writing and culture. CWRC provides an online space for creating collections containing bibliographical records, page scans and other images, audio, video, and born-digital texts. It supports thematic collections, biocritical scholarship such as that of the Orlando Project, critical editions, side-by-side editions of texts and pages images, anthologies and edited collections. To promote interoperability, CWRC leverages linked data to create relationships between people, places, texts and organizations across all collections. It provides a robust platform for Research Data Management, now mandated by SSHRC, with backup, export, and long-term preservation of data, and has been used successfully in pedagogical projects such as Her Story and Contextualizing COVID-19: An Archive for the Future.

The workshop will provide an overview of key principles associated with DH scholarship, from platform-independent data formats and metadata standards to text markup, preservation challenges, and semantic web principles, alongside guiding participants in the use of CWRC, and provide a glimpse into changes pending for CWRC 2.0.

Intended Audience:

The workshop is suitable for anyone interested in a practical introduction to text-oriented digital humanities or in exploring CWRC, as well as those wishing to start up a pedagogical or research project.

LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The University of Guelph resides on the land of the Between the Lakes Treaty No. 3, the territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit. This land is part of the Dish with One Spoon, a covenant between Indigenous nations to live peaceably on the territories of the Great Lakes region. We recognize that today this gathering place is home to many First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and acknowledging them reminds us of our collective responsibility to the land where we learn, live and work.