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SOLAL News

Prof. Joubert Satyre interviewed about late Haitian President Jovenel Moïse

School of Languages and Literatures professor Joubert Satyre was recently interviewed for La Razón, a daily newspaper in Spain. He was invited to share his comments on the tragic assassination of Haitian President Jovenel Moïse. The interview was conducted in Spanish - Satyre's third language - and can be found attached below. 

New book publication by Prof. Clive Thomson

Prof. Clive Thomson (French Studies) has published a new book with Editions Atlande, Paris. Entitled On croit comprendre le monde avec ça!: Entretiens mémoriels avec Henri Mitterrand, the book is a series of interviews with the renouned French professor and specialist of the works of Émile Zola, Henri Mitterrand, a friend, mentor and former professor of Dr. Thomson's.

Group picture in front of Philippeion at Olympia

Trip to Greece

In early May, Dr John Walsh traveled to Greece to visit historical monuments and locations with 30 students and alumni. The group visited Athens, Mycenae, Epidaurus, Corinth, Olympia, Delphi, and several Greek islands. Preparations are underway to visit again next year, and John plans to add Crete to the list of destinations.

Autobiographie et homosexualité en France au XIX siècle de Philippe Lejeune

New publication by Prof. Clive Thomson

Please join us in congratulating Prof. Clive Thomson for the publication of his book, Autobiographie et homosexualité en France au XIXe siècle de Philippe Lejeune. Paris, Éditions de la Sorbonne - Paris 1-Panthéon, 2017, Collection "Tirés à part", ISBN - 979-10-351-0039-1.

In this work, Prof. Clive Thomson shares his experience of reading Lejeune's famous 1987 essay

http://www.editions-sorbonne.fr/fr/livre/?GCOI=28405100331300

 

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LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The University of Guelph resides on the land of the Between the Lakes Treaty No. 3, the territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit. This land is part of the Dish with One Spoon, a covenant between Indigenous nations to live peaceably on the territories of the Great Lakes region. We recognize that today this gathering place is home to many First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and acknowledging them reminds us of our collective responsibility to the land where we learn, live and work.