Karen Wendling | College of Arts

Karen Wendling

Associate Professor
Philosophy
Email: 
wendling@uoguelph.ca
Phone number: 
519-824-4120 x53229
Office: 
MacKinnon 359

Education

BA Michigan State University

MA University of Toronto

PhD University of Toronto

Publications

"A Classification of Feminist Theories", Les Ateliers d'Ethique 3,2 (2008), pp. 8-22

"Education in a Pluralistic Society: Implications of Ross", in Responsibility for Children, ed. Samantha Brennan and Robert Noggle (Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier Press, 2007), pp. 139-156

"Equality and Merit" (with Evan Simpson), Educational Theory 55, 4 (2005), pp. 385-398

"Habits of Inequality: A Radical View of Institutions and Inequality", Journal of Philosophical Research 29 (2004), pp. 353-373

"Choosing the Given", Public Affairs Quarterly 17, 1 (2003), pp. 65-82

"Could a Feminist and a Game Theorist Co-Parent?" (with Paul Viminitz), Canadian Journal of Philosophy 28, 1 (1998), pp. 33-50

"Two Concepts of Rawls", A Question of Values, ed. Samantha Brennan, Tracy Isaacs and Michael Milde Amsterdam: Rodopi Press, 1997), pp. 135-153

"Unavoidable Inequalities: Some Implications for Participatory Democratic Theory", Social Theory and Practice 23, 2 (1997), pp. 161-179

"Is Science Unique?" (review essay of Higher Superstition: The Academic Left and Its Quarrels with Science by Paul R. Gross and Norman Levitt), Biology and Philosophy 11, 3 (1996), pp. 421-438

"Children, Mentally Handicapped People and Equality", Ethique et droits fondamentaux/ Ethics and Basic Rights, ed. Guy Lafrance (Ottawa: Presses de l'Universite de Ottawa, 1989), pp. 110-116

 

LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The University of Guelph resides on the land of the Between the Lakes Treaty No. 3, the territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit. This land is part of the Dish with One Spoon, a covenant between Indigenous nations to live peaceably on the territories of the Great Lakes region. We recognize that today this gathering place is home to many First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and acknowledging them reminds us of our collective responsibility to the land where we learn, live and work.