Women in the History of Philosophy (PHIL*3210) | College of Arts

Women in the History of Philosophy (PHIL*3210)

Code and section: PHIL*3210*01

Term: Fall 2021

Instructor: Karen Wendling

Details

Method of Delivery:

Face-to-face or hybrid. If hybrid, it will be split into two face-to-face sections, one Tuesday and the other Thursday, and the class also will be livestreamed and recorded for those not attending that day.

Course Synopsis:

This course will focus on women’s arguments for equality over the centuries. We will begin with a brief history of patriarchy and the reasons philosophers gave for the inequality of women and others. Then we will examine women’s arguments for equality, beginning in the 15th century and continuing to the first half of the 20th century. The earliest arguments focus on women’s equality. Roughly from the French Revolution on, however, many women also advocated the equality of other social groups. We will discuss reasons for the changes in the nature of the arguments, and we will evaluate them philosophically. By the end of the course, you should have a better understanding of women’s contributions to debates about equality.

Assignments & Means of Evaluation (tentative):

  • Participation: 10% (includes answers to assigned discussion questions)
  • Best 2 of 3 essays: 30% each
  • Final Essay: 30%

Required Textbooks:

Material will be on Courselink or on reserve at the library.

Please note: This is a preliminary web course outline only. The Philosophy Department reserves the right to change without notice any information in this description. The final, binding course outline will be distributed in the first class of the semester.

LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The University of Guelph resides on the land of the Between the Lakes Treaty No. 3, the territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit. This land is part of the Dish with One Spoon, a covenant between Indigenous nations to live peaceably on the territories of the Great Lakes region. We recognize that today this gathering place is home to many First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and acknowledging them reminds us of our collective responsibility to the land where we learn, live and work.